pros and cons of becoming vegan?

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Justmoll28
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i currently eat meat and vegetables but i am also lactose intolerance so i am used to having soya milk and other dairy substitutes, do you think i should try being vegan to help me become more healthy? at the minutes i am a couple of stone overweight and i just feel like i need a lifestyle change.

however, i dont know how i can survive without meat?! any advice or pros/cons on trying veganism?
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Flozzie543
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It's a pretty joyless and expensive lifestyle as it is very hard to get all the nutrition you need living off nothing but salad and nuts.
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saeed97
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Pros: none
Cons: no meat
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shawn_o1
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You can change your lifestyle just by going out more often and/or eating slightly less every day
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Maker
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I am a megan, I only eat meat.
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earthworm
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Pros; you can tell people you are vegen and pretend to be superior.

Cons; Most people will think you are wierd.
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ChrisHarris1
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(Original post by Justmoll28)
i currently eat meat and vegetables but i am also lactose intolerance so i am used to having soya milk and other dairy substitutes, do you think i should try being vegan to help me become more healthy? at the minutes i am a couple of stone overweight and i just feel like i need a lifestyle change.

however, i dont know how i can survive without meat?! any advice or pros/cons on trying veganism?
ok serious answer.

being a vegan isn't healthier

giving up milk and soy is beneficial

if your purpose is to become healthier just clean up your diet and exercise more rather than make a drastic change such as veganism
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Angry cucumber
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If you're lactose intolerant, dropping dairy is wise. However health benefit points are not clearely defined at all, I cba arguing with it

If you eat a high red meat diet, then veganism will probably reduce your heart disease risk, however other than that, veganisms health benefits are somewhat sketchy in terms of causation and not correlation.

If you're sole goal is to be healthy, I agree with ChrisHarris in that eating more veggies, more lean white meat and exercise more would be easier and more sustainable than drastically changing to veganism
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Justmoll28
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(Original post by Angry cucumber)
If you're lactose intolerant, dropping dairy is wise. However health benefit points are not clearely defined at all, I cba arguing with it

If you eat a high red meat diet, then veganism will probably reduce your heart disease risk, however other than that, veganisms health benefits are somewhat sketchy in terms of causation and not correlation.

If you're sole goal is to be healthy, I agree with ChrisHarris in that eating more veggies, more lean white meat and exercise more would be easier and more sustainable than drastically changing to veganism
i dont like any red meat at all so i dont eat that either, my diet literally consists of fish, chicken and veggies and soy milk/yoghurt
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AlesanaWill
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I'm a vegan and I believe the benefits of veganism certainly outweigh the costs. I went vegan for the animals and the environment rather than for my health, though I know lots of people do it for health reasons.

Pros:
-It cuts out a lot of unhealthy foods (takeaways, burgers, pizza, etc.) that are high in fat & calories, so a vegan diet may help you lose weight and improve your health. There have been quite a few studies suggesting a vegan diet is beneficial, though I don't think there's definitive evidence. There are certainly less overweight vegans / vegetarians than in the general population (though that may not be a direct consequence of diet).
-No animal cruelty.
-Much better for the environment than a meat-based diet: producing vegan foods emits much less carbon dioxide, requires less land and less water.

Cons:
-Fewer food choices, especially when out and about. Though I don't find this a problem - supermarkets are really good now at stocking vegan foods, and there are lots of organic / health food shops with vegan stuff.
-You have to do a bit of research on nutrition to make sure you're getting everything you need. A vegan diet misses out on B12, but this is added to most plant based milks and isn't a problem for me. Same with calcium.

Neutral:
-You'll probably have to learn to cook, as there aren't many vegan ready meals (at least they're not cheap). This has been a pro for me as I've discovered I really enjoy cooking and trying new things. Veganism means you have to be a bit experimental and creative, which is fun, especially in baking.
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ChrisHarris1
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(Original post by Angry cucumber)

.
The issue is:

Health isn't binary so nothing is either healthy or unhealthy

Everything has an effect

& too many factors involved (lifestyle, genetics, etc)

However OP - avoid soy

Soy raises estrogen levels , making it harder to lose fat

Just cut out milk and milk substitutes

The ills of meat are no worse than processed food
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abc:)
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(Original post by Justmoll28)
i currently eat meat and vegetables but i am also lactose intolerance so i am used to having soya milk and other dairy substitutes, do you think i should try being vegan to help me become more healthy? at the minutes i am a couple of stone overweight and i just feel like i need a lifestyle change.

however, i dont know how i can survive without meat?! any advice or pros/cons on trying veganism?
If you don't know how you can survive without meat, you may struggle. I am a meat eater but don't rely on it, I can go for days without eating it and not really notice. However I went vegan for a fortnight and really struggled.

I know some people who are vegan and feel extremely healthy. If you want a middle ground, you could eat fish and eggs, but cut out other meats and dairy. My sister does this and is incredibly healthy.

To be completely vegan though, I think you need to have access to a lot of high quality foods. This means both money and having stores near you that sell vegan alternatives and a wide range of veg, pulses, etc. My problem was that as a student I relied on cheap, easy and unhealthy foods like ready salted crisps, chips, basically a lot of high carb food to satisfy my cravings. If I could have afforded a load of fancy vegan foods I might have found it easier and felt healthier.

So in short, if you're considering it I'd go halfway first - cut out meat, but keep everything else. Or cut out meat and dairy. Something like that. And just make sure you have some nice, healthy foods to eat so you don't end up feeling groggy like I did
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Angry cucumber
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(Original post by ChrisHarris1)
The issue is:

Health isn't binary so nothing is either healthy or unhealthy

Everything has an effect

& too many factors involved (lifestyle, genetics, etc)

However OP - avoid soy

Soy raises estrogen levels , making it harder to lose fat

Just cut out milk and milk substitutes

The ills of meat are no worse than processed food
I agree with all, but I'm reasonably sure the soy point has been refuted in a few studies. If it does raise it, if it's still in the normal physiological range, it matters nought, much like test levels
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Angry cucumber
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Problem for meat eaters eliminating meat is that if you grow up with it, people tend to crave it. Hence why a lot of people fail because of bacon or whatever.
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ChrisHarris1
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(Original post by Angry cucumber)
I agree with all, but I'm reasonably sure the soy point has been refuted in few studies. If it does raise it, if it's still in the normal physiological range, it matters nought, much like test levels
It does actually

Even if it's within normal range

The point is, it makes it harder to diet

& if you want to use the test analogy

Simply that, those who have higher natural test tend to grow muscle more easy

Ergo: avoid stuff that can inhibit fat loss
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Danval
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I think that being a vegan is a bit extreme for any organism, because it´s not good for a person to completely cut out certain food from the body. Each person would have to eat a moderate dose of carbohydrates, fats, and vitamins and other ingredients on a daily basis. It is normal that a person does not correspond to a certain food for the body, for which is good to be removed from the diet, but it does not apply to an entire category of products and food like in vegan cases, because it can have a negative effect for long term on the human body.
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Veggiechic6
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I was vegan for 2 1/2 years before going back to veggie. It's definitely doable and a great healthy diet if you do it properly. The main issue I found was whenever I wanted to eat somewhere that wasn't my own home. Restaurants, going abroad, other peoples' houses. That's when you'll find you're very limited and it can be quite frustrating. Especially when you tell people you're vegan and they immediately ask 'well what do you eat then?' as though you're obviously a skeleton who eats nothing or you're supposed to sit there and reel off a list.

I enjoyed eating vegan alternative to meat products. You can pretty much get meat/dairy free of anything. Some vegans don't like that kind of thing though as it doesn't seem natural e.g. 'facon' not bacon and 'cheezley' instead of cheese. They're also harder to find and more expensive.

Good luck! Maybe instead of going full vegan, you could just have vegan weekends or something. Then it's less extreme and could still benefit your health.
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RF_PineMarten
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Going vegan is not inherently more healthy. The health benefits don't come from cutting out meat, but because vegetarian and vegan diets force you yo eat more fruits and vegetables and cut out unhealthy stuff like burgers. You can easily do that on a diet that still includes meat.
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BKS
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CBA reading whole thread


On soy: it seems some people are sensitive to soy, they seem to be a fairly small minority and it seems to be that they need to eat a hell of a lot of it to get a reaction. There's no real evidence it does anything to the estrogen of the vast majority of people, I believe it was just a few case studies that caused a fuss
look up 'Jack Norris RD' for sources, he's good of vegan nutrition generally cause he's evidence based and wants to give vegans good info rather than promote veganism



I'm vegan, I don't think being vegan is healthier. My sister is vegan , she's hugely fat and has a terrible diet, still vegan. But there's also plenty entirely healthy vegans. The perception of being healthier is created by folk cutting out all junk food at first but there's more than enough vegan junk. I don't think anyone should become vegan for health reasons because its not logical.

I think the only real pro of being vegan is ethical, to me it is about trying to live in a way the minimise the amount of harm caused, since we don't need animal products to be happy and healthy I don't see why you'd choose to cause harm to animals- environmental arguments too on causing more harm than you need to. That's very aligned to my sense of right and wrong so it's a big pro for me.


Cons:
you need to be more organised, you can't expect to get food everywhere and anywhere
it's a learning curve, it's hard work at first whilst you work out what to eat
people assume you are a crazy hippy or start arguments with you then call you preachy or ask you why you don't want a food then make out like you always go on about being vegan, hell is other people really
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Justmoll28
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(Original post by BKS)
CBA reading whole thread

I'm vegan, I don't think being vegan is healthier. My sister is vegan , she's hugely fat and has a terrible diet, still vegan. But there's also plenty entirely healthy vegans. The perception of being healthier is created by folk cutting out all junk food at first but there's more than enough vegan junk. I don't think anyone should become vegan for health reasons because its not logical.
I understand your answer but man, thats your sister youre talking about..
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