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Help with TSR teaching idea [not sure if it already exists] watch

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    If it exists already and I just can't find it; I apologise

    So I understand that a lot of people are taught how to differentiate and integrate, but they don't truly understand what the process entails [I'm not gonna lie, I don't fully understand it -- but it makes more sense to me than to most people at AS\2]. At least with Edexcel, we're taught the rule for differentiating and integrating ax^n with respect to x, but we're not taught why or how it is why it is; mostly because we're not taught to understand it from first principles. This is the case for a lot of maths and physics atm and I want to help people see what it really is.

    So to explain it from scratch, I thought of compiling a load of explanations that aren't often covered in the syllabus that would really help people when it comes to intuitive understanding. Like a little wikipedia that explains some stuff at an A level student's level, and if you don't understand it or have an idea for an improvement, post a comment in the thread and changes can be made to it at any time to better the explanation and improve it; all on TSR.

    I've looked at the study resources, but none enable you to type LaTex formulae in (from what I've seen)

    Problem is:
    1) IDK if this is already a thing on TSR
    2) Would TSR be a good place to start it (if it isn't a thing on TSR already)
    3) Would people appreciate if I posted stuff like this?

    If it is a thing, I'll try to delete the thread or something and I'm sorry for wasting your time , but please tell me how I can find it!
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    (Original post by Callum Scott)
    ...
    It's a thing already : the TSR wiki. That page needs updating : a lot those topics should have links.

    E.g. Differentiation from 1st principles.

    But feel free to edit this page and others. I'm not sure if they get much editing anymore.

    I should remember to link to articles from the wiki when someone has a problem that needs a long explanation.

    Edit : The wiki really should be publicised better (maybe as a sticky?) so that more people can use it as well as edit it.
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    (Original post by Callum Scott)
    If it exists already and I just can't find it; I apologise

    So I understand that a lot of people are taught how to differentiate and integrate, but they don't truly understand what the process entails [I'm not gonna lie, I don't fully understand it -- but it makes more sense to me than to most people at AS\2]. At least with Edexcel, we're taught the rule for differentiating and integrating ax^n with respect to x, but we're not taught why or how it is why it is; mostly because we're not taught to understand it from first principles. This is the case for a lot of maths and physics atm and I want to help people see what it really is.

    So to explain it from scratch, I thought of compiling a load of explanations that aren't often covered in the syllabus that would really help people when it comes to intuitive understanding. Like a little wikipedia that explains some stuff at an A level student's level, and if you don't understand it or have an idea for an improvement, post a comment in the thread and changes can be made to it at any time to better the explanation and improve it; all on TSR.

    I've looked at the study resources, but none enable you to type LaTex formulae in (from what I've seen)

    Problem is:
    1) IDK if this is already a thing on TSR
    2) Would TSR be a good place to start it (if it isn't a thing on TSR already)
    3) Would people appreciate if I posted stuff like this?

    If it is a thing, I'll try to delete the thread or something and I'm sorry for wasting your time , but please tell me how I can find it!
    Tbh I'd suggest googling things like "differentiation from first principles" first and seeing what comes up.

    Your idea is laudable, but I suspect you'd just be re-typing something that already exists (e.g. via a Wikipedia article or other academic site) so unless you just want the Latex practice you'd be making a lot of work for yourself.

    People do ask questions about this sort of thing periodically on TSR so there will be some threads already on here that cover what your're suggesting, but admittedly not in an easily-searchable state!

    I don't think it would cause any offence to anyone on here if you did what you're suggesting, but sometimes it's more efficient to track down an existing helpful article that does what you want and posting a link to it

    EDIT: Thanks to notnek for posting too - I didn't even know about the TSR wiki articles
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    (Original post by Callum Scott)
    If it exists already and I just can't find it; I apologise

    So I understand that a lot of people are taught how to differentiate and integrate, but they don't truly understand what the process entails [I'm not gonna lie, I don't fully understand it -- but it makes more sense to me than to most people at AS\2]. At least with Edexcel, we're taught the rule for differentiating and integrating ax^n with respect to x, but we're not taught why or how it is why it is; mostly because we're not taught to understand it from first principles. This is the case for a lot of maths and physics atm and I want to help people see what it really is.

    So to explain it from scratch, I thought of compiling a load of explanations that aren't often covered in the syllabus that would really help people when it comes to intuitive understanding. Like a little wikipedia that explains some stuff at an A level student's level, and if you don't understand it or have an idea for an improvement, post a comment in the thread and changes can be made to it at any time to better the explanation and improve it; all on TSR.

    I've looked at the study resources, but none enable you to type LaTex formulae in (from what I've seen)

    Problem is:
    1) IDK if this is already a thing on TSR
    2) Would TSR be a good place to start it (if it isn't a thing on TSR already)
    3) Would people appreciate if I posted stuff like this?

    If it is a thing, I'll try to delete the thread or something and I'm sorry for wasting your time , but please tell me how I can find it!
    You're assuming that most teachers don't explain differentiation from first principles; this is just not true.

    We teach what it is important and the syllabus is part of that

    I'm sure there are other more useful things to do.
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    (Original post by davros)
    I didn't even know about the TSR wiki articles
    Most people don't - that's the main problem with them
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    (Original post by Muttley79)
    You're assuming that most teachers don't explain differentiation from first principles; this is just not true.

    We teach what it is important and the syllabus is part of that

    I'm sure there are other more useful things to do.
    I could be completely wrong but my guess would be that most (i.e. 50% +) A-Level teachers don't teach differentiation from first principles.

    Of course a good teacher always will teach it but experience at "bad" schools has shown me that plenty don't.
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    (Original post by notnek)
    It's a thing already : the TSR wiki. That page needs updating : a lot those topics should have links.

    E.g. Differentiation from 1st principles.

    But feel free to edit this page and others. I'm not sure if they get much editing anymore.

    I should remember to link to articles from the wiki when someone has a problem that needs a long explanation.

    Edit : The wiki really should be publicised better (maybe as a sticky?) so that more people can use it as well as edit it.
    I knew I'd seen something like this, I just couldn't find it anywhere! I thank you very much :P

    Edit: How do I access it other than through the link you've provided?!
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    (Original post by notnek)
    I could be completely wrong but my guess would be that most (i.e. 50% +) A-Level teachers don't teach differentiation from first principles.

    Of course a good teacher always will teach it but experience at "bad" schools has shown me that plenty don't.
    In every school I know of it is taught ...
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    (Original post by davros)
    Tbh I'd suggest googling things like "differentiation from first principles" first and seeing what comes up.

    Your idea is laudable, but I suspect you'd just be re-typing something that already exists (e.g. via a Wikipedia article or other academic site) so unless you just want the Latex practice you'd be making a lot of work for yourself.

    People do ask questions about this sort of thing periodically on TSR so there will be some threads already on here that cover what your're suggesting, but admittedly not in an easily-searchable state!

    I don't think it would cause any offence to anyone on here if you did what you're suggesting, but sometimes it's more efficient to track down an existing helpful article that does what you want and posting a link to it

    EDIT: Thanks to notnek for posting too - I didn't even know about the TSR wiki articles
    I never planned on doing it for everything, just little tips and stuff I'd discovered along the way that aren't necessarily always taught in the syllabus; like differentiation from first principles & that suvats can be derived from calculus; but also derivations of things like e^{i\theta} = \cos(\theta) + i\sin(\theta), centripetal acceleration and stuff like that: just little things I've enjoyed finding out.

    I learn best from teaching others; + I'm in love with LaTex atm
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    (Original post by Muttley79)
    In every school I know of it is taught ...
    Add mine to your "not taught" list then lol, it wasn't mentioned to other students until after the exams! what use is that?!
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    (Original post by Muttley79)
    In every school I know of it is taught ...
    To give you an example, at one school that I worked 1st principles was part of the scheme of work but the head of maths didn't teach it because he thought his students would find it too hard. I've seen a similar attitude from other teachers.

    Back when I was at school even the further maths class weren't taught it.

    It's entirely possible that the overall picture is different to my experiences.
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    (Original post by notnek)
    It's a thing already : the TSR wiki. That page needs updating : a lot those topics should have links.

    E.g. Differentiation from 1st principles.

    But feel free to edit this page and others. I'm not sure if they get much editing anymore.
    OK so having visited the wiki, looking at the first page that I came across; noticing that all 3 of Newton's laws lacked detail and precision; I've edited them, but I still feel as though I can't speak maths; when it's a physics/maths page!

    I feel bad for adding the (\because) symbol! Let alone if I'd have said something like: F \equiv \frac{dP}{dt}... is there a way I can still go into mathematical detail without scaring people on the wiki?
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    (Original post by Callum Scott)
    So I understand that a lot of people are taught how to differentiate and integrate...
    I love this idea! I've always liked teaching. If you do go through with it, let me know, I'd love to help!

    Also if you love teaching so much, I recommend asking the teacher so you could run a support session for maths (if you have the time) in school. That's what I will be doing, and I'll use this session to also talk about those things that aren't usually taught, like the derivations for differentiation and definite integration.
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    (Original post by gagafacea1)
    I love this idea! I've always liked teaching. If you do go through with it, let me know, I'd love to help!

    Also if you love teaching so much, I recommend asking the teacher so you could run a support session for maths (if you have the time) in school. That's what I will be doing, and I'll use this session to also talk about those things that aren't usually taught, like the derivations for differentiation and definite integration.
    There was a chance to volunteer and help out in my college's maths student support area, but apparently 2 people already jumped at the opportunity :T

    There's no point doing i now, since there's already a wiki. The best thing I can do I to probably edit the wiki, make it a bit better, make some new, helpful pages and beg that more people start using it lol
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    (Original post by Callum Scott)
    There was a chance to volunteer and help out in my college's maths student support area, but apparently 2 people already jumped at the opportunity :T

    There's no point doing i now, since there's already a wiki. The best thing I can do I to probably edit the wiki, make it a bit better, make some new, helpful pages and beg that more people start using it lol
    How when they can barely find it? lol Everytime I try to look for the wiki I struggle until I give up and go to google to look for it from there.
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    (Original post by Callum Scott)
    There was a chance to volunteer and help out in my college's maths student support area, but apparently 2 people already jumped at the opportunity :T

    There's no point doing i now, since there's already a wiki. The best thing I can do I to probably edit the wiki, make it a bit better, make some new, helpful pages and beg that more people start using it lol
    Keep your eye on the maths and maths exams forum and link to the wiki when it can enable a user to learn how to answer a question.
    Awareness will then spread.


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    That's why it's an actual topic with WJEC C1.

    You have to differentiate from first principles in the question.

    It also comes up in FP1 with more algebra heavy functions.
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    (Original post by notnek)
    To give you an example, at one school that I worked 1st principles was part of the scheme of work but the head of maths didn't teach it because he thought his students would find it too hard. I've seen a similar attitude from other teachers.

    Back when I was at school even the further maths class weren't taught it.

    It's entirely possible that the overall picture is different to my experiences.
    I find it strange that differentiation from first principles is taught and tested on OCR additional maths (taken with GCSE's), but not at A-level...
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    A problem with teaching differentiation from 1st principles as an introduction to differentation is that C1 students have never studied limits (and most of them never will).

    C1 should include a small section on limits - that would make 1st principles lessons easier for students as well as teachers.
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    I'd advise anyone who is thinking about taking STEP or anyone who wants to learn calculus without compromising on the detail to look up a book called James Stewart's Early Transcendentals.
 
 
 
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