Turn on thread page Beta

Where should I go for my MSc? watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Hi everyone,

    I’ve just graduated with a first class for my BSc economics (~73%) from university ranked about 20th in the UK. I got firsts in all of my final year modules, and mid 80s in the core modules in 2nd year. I’m wondering how likely it is that after taking a year out to gain some relevant work experience - I’m currently interning in Shanghai - that I can get into the likes of UCL/LSE/Warwick etc for an MSc Economics starting in 2016?

    The two things putting me off are that in 2nd year I only achieved a mid 2:2 in my Mathematical Economics module (put this down to complacency!) and that I was rejected by LSE and UCL for 2015 entry (but I think this was down to a rushed personal statement).

    Please if anyone on here can give me some advice or help it would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!
    • TSR Support Team
    • Very Important Poster
    • PS Reviewer
    Online

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Very Important Poster
    PS Reviewer
    Did LSE and UCL give you reasons for rejection? I would think relevant work experience would really help your application. Also bear in mind that a PS at postgrad level is looked at in more detail that it is at undergrad level.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by alleycat393)
    Did LSE and UCL give you reasons for rejection? I would think relevant work experience would really help your application. Also bear in mind that a PS at postgrad level is looked at in more detail that it is at undergrad level.
    Thanks for the reply! Sadly they didn't give a reason but I'm certain that is their policy for all applicants. Thank you, I'm working as a financial analyst intern up until autumn and currently looking at off-cycle internships and the like.

    I agree with you about personal statements - at the time I wanted to get my applications in quickly - something I realise now was foolish.

    Do you think my maths will count against me? Or since I have strong grades across all other modules they will overlook this?

    Thank you!
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Another aspect to consider would be your academic references. Mediocre performance during your undergrad degree might have been mentioned by your referees. Double-check that you picked the right people - for top-end unis like LSE and UCL, academic references will need to be unequivocal.

    An underworked PS and lukewarm references could be a fatal combo. References alone could sink you, even with a reworked and improved PS.
    • TSR Support Team
    • Very Important Poster
    • PS Reviewer
    Online

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Very Important Poster
    PS Reviewer
    Depends on how big of a component maths is of the masters course. Was there a reason why you didn't do so well in math that you referee could comment on maybe? You could show or talk about what you've done to improve your math knowledge and skills, in your PS, but make sure that you keep it positive and don't dwell too much on it so as to draw specific attention to it or make excuses.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Klix88)
    Another aspect to consider would be your academic references. Mediocre performance during your undergrad degree might have been mentioned by your referees. Double-check that you picked the right people - for top-end unis like LSE and UCL, academic references will need to be unequivocal.

    An underworked PS and lukewarm references could be a fatal combo. References alone could sink you, even with a reworked and improved PS.
    Thanks for the response! Both my referees would have said good things about me I'm pretty sure but perhaps not exactly what UCL/LSE were looking for! I wouldn't say my performance was mediocre - but it certainly will look better this time around than last year.

    3rd year: 72% - firsts in every module.
    2nd year: 73% - top of my year for some modules, couple of 2:1s and a 2:2 in Mathematical Economics.

    On a side note, would a decent GMAT score drastically improve my chances? I know for sure I'm far better at quantitative things than my 2:2 in that module suggests.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by alleycat393)
    Depends on how big of a component maths is of the masters course. Was there a reason why you didn't do so well in math that you referee could comment on maybe? You could show or talk about what you've done to improve your math knowledge and skills, in your PS, but make sure that you keep it positive and don't dwell too much on it so as to draw specific attention to it or make excuses.
    Just plain complacency sadly. I could always take the GMAT to prove how capable I am? But that is a relatively long process and I believe my application could be ok without it?

    A close friend of mine was accepted to UCL with marginally worse grades but a far better researched PS...!
    • TSR Support Team
    • Very Important Poster
    • PS Reviewer
    Online

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Very Important Poster
    PS Reviewer
    Depends on how the GMAT is viewed by admissions tutors. Maybe contact the uni and see what they think.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Did you apply to the one year MSc or two-year MSc at the LSE?
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    You should have asked for feedback. My friend was rejected by Imperial, he asked and they told him why.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by WokSz)
    Did you apply to the one year MSc or two-year MSc at the LSE?
    The one year program
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by EconomistJack)
    The one year program
    I would look at the two-year course. You will need to do the GRE, if I remember correctly but if you really want to do Economics, LSE is definitely one of the best places in the world to study it. I've also heard great things about UCL's course, but that was from my tutor and she was slightly biased.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by WokSz)
    I would look at the two-year course. You will need to do the GRE, if I remember correctly but if you really want to do Economics, LSE is definitely one of the best places in the world to study it. I've also heard great things about UCL's course, but that was from my tutor and she was slightly biased.
    Ok I'll take a look. I already have a BSc Economics though, surely that means I am ineligible as it's mainly for students without undergraduate experience of economics?
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by EconomistJack)
    Ok I'll take a look. I already have a BSc Economics though, surely that means I am ineligible as it's mainly for students without undergraduate experience of economics?
    It's funny you mention that because someone back when I was an undergraduate actually did his BSc in Economics but was accepted to the the two-year course simply because his level of Maths was not on par with other people on the course. I'm not sure if this is a special case but that's what happened to him. Maybe you can inquire directly with the LSE but it's just what I assumed. Sorry, my knowledge of Economics is very limited.
 
 
 
Poll
Cats or dogs?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.