Speech and Language or Nursing (LD)

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jd2093
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#1
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#1
I'm 22 years old and have worked in the area of childcare and disabilities since I was 16 so it's definitely something I want to do however feeling very frustrated in my support worker job at the minute.

I have taken a year out after getting my BA and finally need to make this decision but there are so many pro and cons!

So just looking for any information from people who are studying either of these or work in this area to give me any insight and if you're enjoying it or not? if you feel it's worth it etc

any help at all is appreciated !!!
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JordanC55
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#2
Report 6 years ago
#2
(Original post by jd2093)
I'm 22 years old and have worked in the area of childcare and disabilities since I was 16 so it's definitely something I want to do however feeling very frustrated in my support worker job at the minute.

I have taken a year out after getting my BA and finally need to make this decision but there are so many pro and cons!

So just looking for any information from people who are studying either of these or work in this area to give me any insight and if you're enjoying it or not? if you feel it's worth it etc

any help at all is appreciated !!!
What sort of help do you want? Tbh, both jobs are going to be rewarding and good careers but they'll also have long hours and stressful work loads.

I'd say do research into both and draw a conclusion from that, don't base it entirely on someone else's advice cause their experience may be completely different to yours.
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evantej
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#3
Report 6 years ago
#3
(Original post by jd2093)
I'm 22 years old and have worked in the area of childcare and disabilities since I was 16 so it's definitely something I want to do however feeling very frustrated in my support worker job at the minute.

I have taken a year out after getting my BA and finally need to make this decision but there are so many pro and cons!

So just looking for any information from people who are studying either of these or work in this area to give me any insight and if you're enjoying it or not? if you feel it's worth it etc

any help at all is appreciated !!!
In all honesty both professions work with almost exactly the same people. The first speech and language therapist I met in person actually worked in a secure unit for people with learning disabilities and oversaw a LD nurse who 'specialised' in speech. (I am studying SLT now and have a research interest in offenders where LD is very prevalent as you can imagine).

The main difference I guess is that SLTs will probably work with a wider spectrum of LD people than nurses (e.g. children in schools). Also SLT is a clinical position so you would take a lead role in diagnosis while the nurse would support (really depends on the context I guess). When you train you would also have to do a lot - if you knew you definitely wanted to work in LD - of things which you would probably think are a waste of time (e.g. a lot of the anatomy, most of the speech and voice disorders stuff, most of the linguistics and phonetics, all the stroke/motor speech disorder stuff). I suppose this is the main benefit of nursing that you can specialize from day one so to speak whereas SLTs have to receive training in lots of different subjects in order to work in different areas.

I think the best thing for you to do is to talk to a LD nurse and observe them working if possible. (I am less knowledgeable about what kind of places LD nurses work in). The obvious benefit to choosing the nursing path is that you will probably not have to worry about securing a job.
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jd2093
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#4
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#4
(Original post by JordanC55)
What sort of help do you want? Tbh, both jobs are going to be rewarding and good careers but they'll also have long hours and stressful work loads.

I'd say do research into both and draw a conclusion from that, don't base it entirely on someone else's advice cause their experience may be completely different to yours.
I was looking for others experiences and info on the course itself, just because I've been researching myself and studying and working in similar environments for about 5/6 years but there is only so much websites can tell you on the courses and job itself. So just looking for some honest and direct experiences.
But yeah overall I would make the decision for myself

Yeah I seem to have found that Nurses have worse hours and SLT have a lot of paperwork depending on where they are working of course.

Thanks for your help though!
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jd2093
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#5
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#5
(Original post by evantej)
In all honesty both professions work with almost exactly the same people. The first speech and language therapist I met in person actually worked in a secure unit for people with learning disabilities and oversaw a LD nurse who 'specialised' in speech. (I am studying SLT now and have a research interest in offenders where LD is very prevalent as you can imagine).

The main difference I guess is that SLTs will probably work with a wider spectrum of LD people than nurses (e.g. children in schools). Also SLT is a clinical position so you would take a lead role in diagnosis while the nurse would support (really depends on the context I guess). When you train you would also have to do a lot - if you knew you definitely wanted to work in LD - of things which you would probably think are a waste of time (e.g. a lot of the anatomy, most of the speech and voice disorders stuff, most of the linguistics and phonetics, all the stroke/motor speech disorder stuff). I suppose this is the main benefit of nursing that you can specialize from day one so to speak whereas SLTs have to receive training in lots of different subjects in order to work in different areas.

I think the best thing for you to do is to talk to a LD nurse and observe them working if possible. (I am less knowledgeable about what kind of places LD nurses work in). The obvious benefit to choosing the nursing path is that you will probably not have to worry about securing a job.
Thanks so much for your info it's really helpful! and Yeah the classes in anatomy and things actually do interest me, it's just the worry that it would be to challenging! but guess I wouldn't know unless I tried.
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evantej
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#6
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#6
(Original post by jd2093)
Thanks so much for your info it's really helpful! and Yeah the classes in anatomy and things actually do interest me, it's just the worry that it would be to challenging! but guess I wouldn't know unless I tried.
You will have to learn some anatomy and physiology no matter what you choose to study, but it will be more with SLT (which comes as a shock to many). If that is not a problem for you then by all means consider SLT. I study at Newcastle and because we have a medical school here we get taught by those people and the difficulty seems higher than on other courses.

I was fine with physiology as it is just an extension of what you have already learned in some cases (e.g. cardiovascular, respiratory, nervous systems). You simply learned more detail or new systems (e.g. muscles, hearing, vision). Anatomy was something else entirely. The people who did well on my course had a knack for remembering facts (e.g. muscle X is attached to bone Y and when it contracts it elevates Z). If you could not do that you basically just had to learn strategies to pass the exams rather than learning everything as there was far too much detail. In summary, be careful which course you go for if you pick SLT!
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jd2093
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#7
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#7
Ahh I never really thought about the differences between uni's but that's a fair point! Yeah I'm not great with stuff like that so I would have to just memorise and things haha!
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evantej
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#8
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#8
(Original post by jd2093)
Ahh I never really thought about the differences between uni's but that's a fair point! Yeah I'm not great with stuff like that so I would have to just memorise and things haha!
There will definitely be fewer differences between universities for nursing because you spend so much time on placement it kind of limits them to what they can cover anyway. But with SLT universities even have different course lengths (three, three and a half and four years) so there is more variation in what they teach you.

If I can help you any further just let me know.
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