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Something needs to be done about people's motorway driving. watch

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    I've come back from driving a few thousand miles on the continent, and it's never been clearer that UK motorway driving etiquette is appalling. Granted we're not the worst at motorway driving, but look at Germany, Switzerland, the Netherlands - good motorway driving is certainly possible, and should be something we aim for.

    In this country, it's not unusual for me to make a (what should be a) 3 hour trip, only for it to end up taking over 5 hours. Motorway traffic is virtually inevitable. A lot of people claim the problem lies with the motorway network: that it needs expanding; that 3 lanes aren't enough. I disagree. Motorway expansion would help, but it's not the limiting factor. The main cause for traffic is people's (lack of) driving etiquette.

    In short, drivers tend to be inconsiderate. Selfish. They don't bother to consider the flow of the motorway as a whole. You get people sat in the middle lane, going slower than those in lane 1. For anyone wanting to drive quicker, the motorway is reduced to one lane. Worse still, even get people sat in the outside lane at 70, because 'that's the speed limit and no-one should drive any faster'. All that does is clog up the motorway, and mean that a couple of miles back, you end up getting tailbacks.

    You also get people seeing a lorry driving in the left lane about 2 miles ahead, and decide it's necessary to move over 2 minutes in advance. Again, that's inconsiderate. You could stay left for a bit longer, and allow others to overtake during that time. And people who brake check should be given 3 points on the spot. And a fine. That's flat out dangerous behaviour. All it results in is angering other drivers, and encouraging undertaking.

    So why do people not follow the simple system of left lane = default, middle =overtaking, right = overtaking overtaking lane? And why do people's egos get so massively bruised if someone wants to overtake? If people want to overtake it's because they want to drive quicker than you, why's that such a big deal? Why speed up? And why does motorway driving not form part of the driving test? Surely this would be an easy way to ensure better driving on motorways?

    Welcome any thoughts on any of this. Even though I realise most of it is just me ranting. But I've got to the point where I avoid motorways unless absolutely necessary nowadays - I can't remember the last time I managed to do 70mph for more than about 30 seconds.
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    Driver education is a big problem in this country. Motorways cannot be touched by learner drivers, so most instructors don't bother teaching it, even though very similar roads (70mph dual carriageways) exist.
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    TSR Group Staff
    Self-driving cars can't come soon enough.
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    I thought fines were supposed to come into place for lane 'hoggers'?
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    (Original post by EloiseStar)
    I thought fines were supposed to come into place for lane 'hoggers'?
    They've always been in place, but there's never a police officer around when you need one...
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    (Original post by Advisor)
    They've always been in place, but there's never a police officer around when you need one...
    I thought it was to do with the cameras maybe cameras should be used to tackle it.

    I never see police on the motorway... If I see them its always on the A roads when I'm travelling through Wales.
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    (Original post by EloiseStar)
    I thought it was to do with the cameras maybe cameras should be used to tackle it.
    Cameras don't capture enough length of road (and all the surrounding circumstances) to make a prosecution watertight enough. A single car on camera in the middle lane could be there for a valid reason; perhaps planning to overtake a slow moving vehicle just out of shot, or perhaps avoiding a lane closure just out of shot.

    The recent publicised case relied on a police officer following the offender for a considerable time and distance over many miles of the M62 to show that the drivers speed was both unduly slow for the whole time, and that opportunities to pull over into lane 1 were there the whole time. Evidence was gathered of the effect on other vehicles over a considerable length of motorway. Unfortunately, a single high-up camera cannot capture all those effects.
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    I think the fact that is that there's absolutely no requirement to be motorway trained in the UK is what's causing most of this problem, coupled with quite vicious speed camera-ing. Perhaps the driving test should be a 2 phase one: phase 1, do current driving test; phase 2, complete and pass a motorway 'module'.
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    (Original post by hothedgehog)
    I think the fact that is that there's absolutely no requirement to be motorway trained in the UK is what's causing most of this problem, coupled with quite vicious speed camera-ing. Perhaps the driving test should be a 2 phase one: phase 1, do current driving test; phase 2, complete and pass a motorway 'module'.
    Exactly that's the point! :borat:
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    (Original post by Nice.Guy)
    I've come back from driving a few thousand miles on the continent, and it's never been clearer that UK motorway driving etiquette is appalling. Granted we're not the worst at motorway driving, but look at Germany, Switzerland, the Netherlands - good motorway driving is certainly possible, and should be something we aim for.

    In this country, it's not unusual for me to make a (what should be a) 3 hour trip, only for it to end up taking over 5 hours. Motorway traffic is virtually inevitable. A lot of people claim the problem lies with the motorway network: that it needs expanding; that 3 lanes aren't enough. I disagree. Motorway expansion would help, but it's not the limiting factor. The main cause for traffic is people's (lack of) driving etiquette.

    In short, drivers tend to be inconsiderate. Selfish. They don't bother to consider the flow of the motorway as a whole. You get people sat in the middle lane, going slower than those in lane 1. For anyone wanting to drive quicker, the motorway is reduced to one lane. Worse still, even get people sat in the outside lane at 70, because 'that's the speed limit and no-one should drive any faster'. All that does is clog up the motorway, and mean that a couple of miles back, you end up getting tailbacks.

    You also get people seeing a lorry driving in the left lane about 2 miles ahead, and decide it's necessary to move over 2 minutes in advance. Again, that's inconsiderate. You could stay left for a bit longer, and allow others to overtake during that time. And people who brake check should be given 3 points on the spot. And a fine. That's flat out dangerous behaviour. All it results in is angering other drivers, and encouraging undertaking.

    So why do people not follow the simple system of left lane = default, middle =overtaking, right = overtaking overtaking lane? And why do people's egos get so massively bruised if someone wants to overtake? If people want to overtake it's because they want to drive quicker than you, why's that such a big deal? Why speed up? And why does motorway driving not form part of the driving test? Surely this would be an easy way to ensure better driving on motorways?

    Welcome any thoughts on any of this. Even though I realise most of it is just me ranting. But I've got to the point where I avoid motorways unless absolutely necessary nowadays - I can't remember the last time I managed to do 70mph for more than about 30 seconds.
    I think driving schools should include motorway driving as separate training module. Like for the first step, lets say it module 1 will have initiation to driving like starting a car, shifting the gears, parking, hill stops and reversing. The module 2 will have city driving in it. The last module will be purely motorway driving. At least if not in driving test but it will help yourself build a good etiquette and sense of understanding how motorway system works efficiently no matter how wide or narrow the roads are so that we all can save some time of our lives
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    I agree, undertaking is a serious problem a long with people moving across all lanes in one swoop, which is just stupid.

    Most people seem to be in their own little bubble, I've only been driving just over 2 years now and I've had three near misses at roundabouts alone because of people not looking right and almost going into the side of my car.
    Mistakes happen but when it happens almost regularly, you know there's a problem. :|
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    (Original post by Azhar Rana)
    I think driving schools should include motorway driving as separate training module. Like for the first step, lets say it module 1 will have initiation to driving like starting a car, shifting the gears, parking, hill stops and reversing. The module 2 will have city driving in it. The last module will be purely motorway driving. At least if not in driving test but it will help yourself build a good etiquette and sense of understanding how motorway system works efficiently no matter how wide or narrow the roads are so that we all can save some time of our lives
    Think you're onto something here - perhaps a 'Level 1' licence where you drive anywhere except motorways, then a Level 2 licence allowing permission to drive on motorways, only once you've had lessons with an instructor on the motorway. There would have to be a minimum amount of time between receiving each licence. That would mean only people who've passed the first licence (and are relatively competent drivers) are allowed on the motorway.
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    (Original post by Nice.Guy)
    I've come back from driving a few thousand miles on the continent, and it's never been clearer that UK motorway driving etiquette is appalling. Granted we're not the worst at motorway driving, but look at Germany, Switzerland, the Netherlands - good motorway driving is certainly possible, and should be something we aim for.

    In this country, it's not unusual for me to make a (what should be a) 3 hour trip, only for it to end up taking over 5 hours. Motorway traffic is virtually inevitable. A lot of people claim the problem lies with the motorway network: that it needs expanding; that 3 lanes aren't enough. I disagree. Motorway expansion would help, but it's not the limiting factor. The main cause for traffic is people's (lack of) driving etiquette.

    In short, drivers tend to be inconsiderate. Selfish. They don't bother to consider the flow of the motorway as a whole. You get people sat in the middle lane, going slower than those in lane 1. For anyone wanting to drive quicker, the motorway is reduced to one lane. Worse still, even get people sat in the outside lane at 70, because 'that's the speed limit and no-one should drive any faster'. All that does is clog up the motorway, and mean that a couple of miles back, you end up getting tailbacks.

    You also get people seeing a lorry driving in the left lane about 2 miles ahead, and decide it's necessary to move over 2 minutes in advance. Again, that's inconsiderate. You could stay left for a bit longer, and allow others to overtake during that time. And people who brake check should be given 3 points on the spot. And a fine. That's flat out dangerous behaviour. All it results in is angering other drivers, and encouraging undertaking.

    So why do people not follow the simple system of left lane = default, middle =overtaking, right = overtaking overtaking lane? And why do people's egos get so massively bruised if someone wants to overtake? If people want to overtake it's because they want to drive quicker than you, why's that such a big deal? Why speed up? And why does motorway driving not form part of the driving test? Surely this would be an easy way to ensure better driving on motorways?

    Welcome any thoughts on any of this. Even though I realise most of it is just me ranting. But I've got to the point where I avoid motorways unless absolutely necessary nowadays - I can't remember the last time I managed to do 70mph for more than about 30 seconds.
    Completely agree with you. I was on holiday recently and the driving is just so much better on European motorways. It's only after coming back that I realise how bad it is here.
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    Everyone in the UK thinks they're a ****ing vigilante.

    Oh look, a driver going at 75mph down this clear, dry motorway. How dangerous! I'd better slam my brakes on in front of him to teach him a lesson. If only he was a safe and considerate driver like me.

    Brake-testing a tail-gater should be an automatic loss of licence. its deliberately dangerous.
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    Etiquette is one thing, safety is more important.

    UK roads are amongst the safest in the world. Clearly we're doing something right.
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    (Original post by CandyKoRn)
    I agree, undertaking is a serious problem a long with people moving across all lanes in one swoop, which is just stupid.

    Most people seem to be in their own little bubble, I've only been driving just over 2 years now and I've had three near misses at roundabouts alone because of people not looking right and almost going into the side of my car.
    Mistakes happen but when it happens almost regularly, you know there's a problem. :|
    If people didn't lane hog, no one would have an opportunity to undertake, or a need to swoop across all the lanes
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    Etiquette is one thing, safety is more important.

    UK roads are amongst the safest in the world. Clearly we're doing something right.
    The two things go inextricably hand in hand. A considerate driver is a safe driver. Our road system is a wonder of reciprocity and cooperation. If one person decides to stop cooperating, the whole thing goes to **** very quickly.
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    (Original post by cole-slaw)
    The two things go inextricably hand in hand. A considerate driver is a safe driver. Our road system is a wonder of reciprocity and cooperation. If one person decides to stop cooperating, the whole thing goes to **** very quickly.
    True enough, but using your logic, the fact that we have some of the safest roads therefore also means we have some of the politest.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    True enough, but using your logic, the fact that we have some of the safest roads therefore also means we have some of the politest.
    and we do - have you ever driven in France or Italy? Its ****ing mental. When I went to Rome, people don't queue at traffic lights in single file like in this country, they all try and squeeze past the car at the front and then cut in in front of him so that they're at the front of the queue. You end up with about 5 cars all trying to cram into one lane.


    We are in general the politest nation on earth, and its no coincidence we have some of the safest roads.

    In the UK the bad drivers are generally bad drivers because they're selfish ********s. Elsewhere, they're just bad drivers because everyone is a bad driver and no-one knows any better.
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    (Original post by cole-slaw)
    and we do - have you ever driven in France or Italy? Its ****ing mental.
    Many times over many years, but most of my driving there has been in the mountains during winter where they're generally a lot more sensible.
 
 
 
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