Easier way to remember formula for ions? OCR Chemistry A

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KingAuthor
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#1
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#1
I have to learn 32 different formulae for different ions and I've created flash cards to revise them all from. However, I generally find that it doesn't help me remember the formulae. I have a test on the different formulae for ions soon. Is there any other way I can revise them?
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alow
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(Original post by KingAuthor)
I have to learn 32 different formulae for different ions and I've created flash cards to revise them all from. However, I generally find that it doesn't help me remember the formulae. I have a test on the different formulae for ions soon. Is there any other way I can revise them?
Are you sure about that? Is that including obvious **** like \text{Na}^{+},\: \text{Ca}^{2+}, \dddot \:?
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KingAuthor
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(Original post by alow)
Are you sure about that? Is that including obvious **** like \text{Na}^{+},\: \text{Ca}^{2+}, \dddot \:?
Yes, but learning 32 different strings of numbers and letters is numbing my mind a little. It does include those but it also includes some more complicated (to me). Not to be rude, I'm not asking to be criticised for the way I'm not recalling the formula like you are. I just want alternate revision techniques for small chunks of information.
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Plagioclase
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(Original post by KingAuthor)
Yes, but learning 32 different strings of numbers and letters is numbing my mind a little. It does include those but it also includes some more complicated (to me). Not to be rude, I'm not asking to be criticised for the way I'm not recalling the formula like you are. I just want alternate revision techniques for small chunks of information.
If you're trying to rote-learn them (which probably is the best technique for complicated ions), have you tried online flashcard websites like Memrise? It might not instantly get them into your head but it repeats them over time and identifies which ones you find particularly hard and puts an emphasis on those.

However, it shouldn't purely be rote-learning for you. You're not memorising random numbers and letter, you're memorising symbols of elements (which you should be familiar with, at least by name) and the associated ion they form. If you're a visual learner for instance, then you might find it easier to remember that Lithium (Li), Potassium (K) and Rubidium (Rb) are all on the leftmost column of the periodic table (period 1) and everything in period 1 forms 1+ ions and similarly, everything in period 2 forms 2+ ions, etc. Obviously this isn't going to help you with more complicated ions but it should help you with the basics.

It is also about practice though. I never specifically sat down to memorise the ions but by the time I was in Year 12, I had used these ions so many times that I just knew (most of) them.
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KingAuthor
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(Original post by Plagioclase)
If you're trying to rote-learn them (which probably is the best technique for complicated ions), have you tried online flashcard websites like Memrise? It might not instantly get them into your head but it repeats them over time and identifies which ones you find particularly hard and puts an emphasis on those.

However, it shouldn't purely be rote-learning for you. You're not memorising random numbers and letter, you're memorising symbols of elements (which you should be familiar with, at least by name) and the associated ion they form. If you're a visual learner for instance, then you might find it easier to remember that Lithium (Li), Potassium (K) and Rubidium (Rb) are all on the leftmost column of the periodic table (period 1) and everything in period 1 forms 1+ ions and similarly, everything in period 2 forms 2+ ions, etc. Obviously this isn't going to help you with more complicated ions but it should help you with the basics.

It is also about practice though. I never specifically sat down to memorise the ions but by the time I was in Year 12, I had used these ions so many times that I just knew (most of) them.
Thanks

I've realised earlier today that you can see how the ions are formed by the periodic table. I'm just afraid of using the periodic table in the exam since OCR are changing it so it'll be harder and I'm not sure how it will change. I also realise that the best way to learn them is by understanding how they are made which will also help me in the exam. My teacher also said that we'll be using them so many times that they'll be like parasites on our brains. Thanks for the information Really useful!
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Plagioclase
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(Original post by KingAuthor)
Thanks

I've realised earlier today that you can see how the ions are formed by the periodic table. I'm just afraid of using the periodic table in the exam since OCR are changing it so it'll be harder and I'm not sure how it will change. I also realise that the best way to learn them is by understanding how they are made which will also help me in the exam. My teacher also said that we'll be using them so many times that they'll be like parasites on our brains. Thanks for the information Really useful!
The position of the elements definitely are not going to change! But yes, certainly for the elemental ions, you will undoubtedly end up remembering them whether you like it or not. It is worth memorising the more complicated ions but there aren't that many of them that you're meant to know. Good luck!
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KingAuthor
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(Original post by Plagioclase)
The position of the elements definitely are not going to change! But yes, certainly for the elemental ions, you will undoubtedly end up remembering them whether you like it or not. It is worth memorising the more complicated ions but there aren't that many of them that you're meant to know. Good luck!
I'm trying to remember them quickly as I already feel like I'm falling behind even though I've finished all my work. The people in my chemistry class can literally recall everything they learned in triple science, I only did double so I feel as if I've missed a big part of the chemistry course.

However, I am trying and so far I feel like I am exceeding expectation! (I think, I'll probably get target grades of Ds and Es like GCSE)
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Plagioclase
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(Original post by KingAuthor)
I'm trying to remember them quickly as I already feel like I'm falling behind even though I've finished all my work. The people in my chemistry class can literally recall everything they learned in triple science, I only did double so I feel as if I've missed a big part of the chemistry course.

However, I am trying and so far I feel like I am exceeding expectation! (I think, I'll probably get target grades of Ds and Es like GCSE)
I honestly think that AS Chemistry is one of the subjects that has the least connection with its GCSE counterpart because there's such a massive leap in conceptual difficulty. GCSE Chemistry is memorisation-driven whereas AS Chemistry is understanding-driven. The important thing is that you're taking in the new content that you're leaning and making sure that you're asking for help when you need it rather than just hoping that you understand things later.

If it helps, I still have to think back to the formula of nitric acid to remember what charge NO3- has :P
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Pigster
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You'll still get a periodic table with the new OCR A exam.

Also, the spec. states which complex ions you'll be expected to remember.
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Feraligatr
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Considering you're doing AS Chemistry, you won't be expected to learn more complicated ions. I don't think you even look at complicated ions at AS for the new specification.
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youreanutter
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(Original post by Pigster)
You'll still get a periodic table with the new OCR A exam.

Also, the spec. states which complex ions you'll be expected to remember.
which comlex ions do we need to no?
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Pigster
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Errrm, they're all on the spec.

Teacher pro tip: if you have to research them yourself, you're more likely to remember them.

Short-hand for "I can't be bothered to look."
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