Minnie16
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tflanjee
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If you want to do astrophysics at Oxford or Cambridge (and most other places) you have to start by doing a degree in Physics and then specialise. To do a Physics degree you NEED Further Maths, especially at those prestigious places. My advice would be drop chemistry (although it may be useful in astrochemistry) or drop Product Design. Relax on your own time
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Mario Di Maria
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Drop product design even if you're good at it, I see you got the A* at gcse, but it's pointless carrying that to A-Levels coz of what you wanna do at uni. Further Maths is "strongly" preferred by all russel group uni, well most of them, so a combination of Further maths, maths, chemistry and physics will definitely take you where you wanna go.
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Minnie16
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(Original post by tflanjee)
If you want to do astrophysics at Oxford or Cambridge (and most other places) you have to start by doing a degree in Physics and then specialise. To do a Physics degree you NEED Further Maths, especially at those prestigious places. My advice would be drop chemistry (although it may be useful in astrochemistry) or drop Product Design. Relax on your own time
Thanks for the advice, but what scares me is that A level maths seems incresibly hard and Further math scares me lot....i dont know if i have it in me to get a A in further maths
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Minnie16
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(Original post by Mario Di Maria)
Drop product design even if you're good at it, I see you got the A* at gcse, but it's pointless carrying that to A-Levels coz of what you wanna do at uni. Further Maths is "strongly" preferred by all russel group uni, well most of them, so a combination of Further maths, maths, chemistry and physics will definitely take you where you wanna go.
Thank you but im also worried if the unis want someone that cab do things other than science?
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Mario Di Maria
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I see what you mean, like many unis would like a broad range of academic subjects, but then again that dipends like for law you must have a broad range of subjects and especially essay based a levels, in your situation, further maths, maths and physics is a must, your fourth option is purely your choice, chemistry is a really good idea, honestly i dont see product design as valuable as other subjects since it's one of those subjects that lead to only one pathway which is not even the pathway you wanna follow.
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gagafacea1
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(Original post by Jas1947)
Thanks for the advice, but what scares me is that A level maths seems incresibly hard and Further math scares me lot....i dont know if i have it in me to get a A in further maths
How about instead of keeping it seeming difficult, you start looking at the specification and find out what it entails and see if you actually find it difficult. Also if you can't do further maths, then I really don't recommend looking at Oxbridge as an option, as they require high amounts of work and dedication for the subject. And physics and maths are like newly wedded couple, you can't have one without the other.

And about product design, by your description, you're taking only three A levels since only three of your A levels stress you out and require work from you. But Oxbridge students are probably asked to handle the stress of about 10 (exaggeration, maybe) A levels per year (in university). So again, if you can't handle four, that's a bad sign. I'm not saying quit product design, but it looks like it's more of a hobby for you, and hobbies don't belong to school.

Also I apologize if I seem rude. I'm just trying to be honest, telling you what opinion is, we're talking about your future after all. Sugar coating should not be an option when discussing these things.
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Plagioclase
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(Original post by gagafacea1)
How about instead of keeping it seeming difficult, you start looking at the specification and find out what it entails and see if you actually find it difficult. Also if you can't do further maths, then I really don't recommend looking at Oxbridge as an option, as they require high amounts of work and dedication for the subject. And physics and maths are like newly wedded couple, you can't have one without the other.

And about product design, by your description, you're taking only three A levels since only three of your A levels stress you out and require work from you. But Oxbridge students are probably asked to handle the stress of about 10 A levels per year (in university). So again, if you can't handle four, that's a bad sign. I'm not saying quit product design, but it looks like it's more of a hobby for you, and hobbies don't belong to school.
To be fair, I don't really see how you'd be able to work out whether you'd find FP3 difficult or not in two years time when you've just started AS Maths. All of the A2 units are going to look incredibly hard when you've just started Year 12, it's a very difficult thing to gauge. It is true though that Physics at Oxford might not be the best idea if you can't cope with Further Maths though.
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gagafacea1
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(Original post by Plagioclase)
To be fair, I don't really see how you'd be able to work out whether you'd find FP3 difficult or not in two years time when you've just started AS Maths. All of the A2 units are going to look incredibly hard when you've just started Year 12, it's a very difficult thing to gauge. It is true though that Physics at Oxford might not be the best idea if you can't cope with Further Maths though.
Oh no I'm not talking about FP3, but if FP1 is hard for them, then FP2 is definitely not an option. However if they find that FP1 is very doable with a bit of hard work then FP2 is too! Also an AS in Further is better no Further.
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Plagioclase
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(Original post by gagafacea1)
Oh no I'm not talking about FP3, but if FP1 is hard for them, then FP2 is definitely not an option. However if they find that FP1 is very doable with a bit of hard work then FP2 is too! Also an AS in Further is better no Further.
I thought FP1 was actually quite difficult! I personally found it the hardest AS unit...
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gagafacea1
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(Original post by Plagioclase)
I thought FP1 was actually quite difficult! I personally found it the hardest AS unit...
Really? I've had many people say to me that FP1 is very easy, easier than C2.
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Plagioclase
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(Original post by gagafacea1)
Really? I've had many people say to me that FP1 is very easy, easier than C2.
I've heard some people say that too but I have absolutely no idea what they're talking about... I guess everyone finds different things easy but I thought FP1 was way harder than C2.
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Muttley79
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(Original post by Jas1947)
Thanks for the advice, but what scares me is that A level maths seems incresibly hard and Further math scares me lot....i dont know if i have it in me to get a A in further maths
Don't drop Product Design, especially as you enjoy it, drop Chemistry - some students find the design very useful in Engineering.
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rxns_00
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(Original post by tflanjee)
If you want to do astrophysics at Oxford or Cambridge (and most other places) you have to start by doing a degree in Physics and then specialise. To do a Physics degree you NEED Further Maths, especially at those prestigious places. My advice would be drop chemistry (although it may be useful in astrochemistry) or drop Product Design. Relax on your own time
Not quite right... Physical Nat Sci at Cambridge does not require FM
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Minnie16
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(Original post by gagafacea1)
How about instead of keeping it seeming difficult, you start looking at the specification and find out what it entails and see if you actually find it difficult. Also if you can't do further maths, then I really don't recommend looking at Oxbridge as an option, as they require high amounts of work and dedication for the subject. And physics and maths are like newly wedded couple, you can't have one without the other.

And about product design, by your description, you're taking only three A levels since only three of your A levels stress you out and require work from you. But Oxbridge students are probably asked to handle the stress of about 10 (exaggeration, maybe) A levels per year (in university). So again, if you can't handle four, that's a bad sign. I'm not saying quit product design, but it looks like it's more of a hobby for you, and hobbies don't belong to school.

Also I apologize if I seem rude. I'm just trying to be honest, telling you what opinion is, we're talking about your future after all. Sugar coating should not be an option when discussing these things.
Thank you for your honesty, I prefer it when people tell the truth instead of white lies to spare feelings. Thanks
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gagafacea1
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(Original post by Jas1947)
Thank you for your honesty, I prefer it when people tell the truth instead of white lies to spare feelings. Thanks
You're welcome. I've been lied to before (sometimes unintentionally), and it gave me much more trouble than benefitted me. So I learned to never do it to anyone.

Btw How much did you study (revise) for the Maths GCSE, especially during the exams period?
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superconductor
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While it says you don't need further maths in reality without further maths your chance of getting an offer is much lower. A top uni wants to see very strong aptitude in maths and further maths shows that. I study physics at Imperial and I did FM as did most people here. Only 1 or 2 people get in without FM. I recommend maths,FM,physics and chemistry and definitely drop product design, as it weakens your application while chemistry just strengthens it showing you have a strong background in science if you do well. Also by FM I mean A2 because in FP2 and FP3 you learn lots of important maths used in a physics degree.
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Minnie16
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(Original post by superconductor)
While it says you don't need further maths in reality without further maths your chance of getting an offer is much lower. A top uni wants to see very strong aptitude in maths and further maths shows that. I study physics at Imperial and I did FM as did most people here. Only 1 or 2 people get in without FM. I recommend maths,FM,physics and chemistry and definitely drop product design, as it weakens your application while chemistry just strengthens it showing you have a strong background in science if you do well. Also by FM I mean A2 because in FP2 and FP3 you learn lots of important maths used in a physics degree.
Thank you very much, I am going to drop product design as soon as I can. Do you have any tips for achieving an A in maths and further maths?
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Minnie16
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(Original post by gagafacea1)
You're welcome. I've been lied to before (sometimes unintentionally), and it gave me much more trouble than benefitted me. So I learned to never do it to anyone.

Btw How much did you study (revise) for the Maths GCSE, especially during the exams period?
I going to also be honest here...,GCSE will be stressful and you might even lose "friends". I cant remember exactly how many hours i spent revising for maths gcse but i spent 8 hours (with breaks) revising on sunday before the calculator exam. I got rid of ALL social media accounts about 6/8 weeks before the exams. And i basically revised so much that i never had time to reply to social texts and as a result I lost friends. My best advice would just be to get rid of social media accounts, create a timetable when coming close to your exams and make sure you do LOADS of past math papers. Luckily i had a brilliant maths teacher who created a timetable weeks before the exam so i managed to do every single past math paper. But remember that people learn in different ways. Im a bit weird so i relax by studying. But you might relax by watching a film so dont worry if you havent done a 1000 hrs of revison, what matters is if you understand the topic. I hope this helped
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Muttley79
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(Original post by Jas1947)
Thank you very much, I am going to drop product design as soon as I can. Do you have any tips for achieving an A in maths and further maths?
Product Design is good for engineering - drop Chemistry.
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