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    My University allows students to learn a language free alongside their regular degree. This interests me not only because it will help me with a job in international law, but it has always been on my bucket list to learn a language, specifically German.

    I would really appreciate if anyone who has learnt a language from scratch could answer me these questions:
    1. How hard is German (or any language to learn)?
    2. Will it take anything away from my Law degree?
    3. How fluent are you after say, a year of tuition?
    4. Is it worth learning, when I speak the most popular international language anyway?

    Thank you!
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    (Original post by Markg125)
    My University allows students to learn a language free alongside their regular degree. This interests me not only because it will help me with a job in international law, but it has always been on my bucket list to learn a language, specifically German.

    I would really appreciate if anyone who has learnt a language from scratch could answer me these questions:
    1. How hard is German (or any language to learn)?
    2. Will it take anything away from my Law degree?
    3. How fluent are you after say, a year of tuition?
    4. Is it worth learning, when I speak the most popular international language anyway?

    Thank you!
    I can't comment on the law side of things, but I did this myself during my degree (studied German alongside).

    German isn't an easy language, though again it's not as hard as for example I'd perceive Russian or Korean to be.

    If you're studying from scratch then it won't be easy. Despite this for some people languages come naturally, so you might find that when you start. Have you done any GCSEs in languages at all?

    Finally don't expect to be fluent unless you go and live in the country itself or have years of tuition but yes, it is definitely worth it- languages are a great skill to have in any situation!
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    (Original post by Markg125)
    My University allows students to learn a language free alongside their regular degree. This interests me not only because it will help me with a job in international law, but it has always been on my bucket list to learn a language, specifically German.

    I would really appreciate if anyone who has learnt a language from scratch could answer me these questions:
    1. How hard is German (or any language to learn)?
    2. Will it take anything away from my Law degree?
    3. How fluent are you after say, a year of tuition?
    4. Is it worth learning, when I speak the most popular international language anyway?

    Thank you!
    German is definitely one of the more difficult languages to learn, but once you've got to grips with all the rules there are very few exceptions! It would be useful to learn if you have the opportunity because it is a reasonably popular language.
    Fluency would most definitely depend on how quickly you pick up the grammar etc, I've always found it helpful (I study Spanish) to read fictional books in other languages (especially ones you know well in English) to help me continue to expose myself to the language, and there are online bookstores like Wordery with free delivery and a lot of choices of books where you can get books in different languages, and that might help you learn German more quickly!

    Hope this helps
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    I was forced to do German GCSE, so although I can offer some advice, it's a different situation as I didn't want to learn the language.

    It's always handy to know another language and in hindsight I really wish I tried, but I didn't. I found it really hard and the lessons were definitely my least favourite, but like I said this is probably down to me not wanting to learn. As someone else has said being fluent isn't really that achievable without living in the country, this is what my German teacher always told us anyway. Right now if someone offered me free German lessons I would snap them up! I'm not a law student so can't answer that but I'd say knowing another language is very rewarding and is something else to add to your CV.
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    German has its ups-and-downs difficulty-wise. Vocabulary and pronunciation isn't too different from English, which is a plus... but the Grammar system is um .. a pain in the ass. It's generally considered an easy..ish... language to learn (but not as easy as French for example) but the grammar will require excellent dedication haha.

    With regards to "should you bother (essentially)" - yes. Another language will still open doors for you and is impressive for employers, needless to mention the fact that it can even improve your brainpower: http://www.livescience.com/48721-bil...ybuilders.html.
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    I'd say German is one of the easiest languages to learn (out of the ones that were available to me at GCSE and what not, anyway.)

    A lot of vocabulary similar to English.
    Easy to conjugate the different tenses (if you have a knack for it.)
    Easy to conjugate passive voice.
    I suppose cases can be annoying, but you just gotta learn those (and the intricacies.)
    Vocabs a *****, but that's like any language, I would presume. I just found a really good way to tackle vocab though.

    All of the patterns link, if that makes sense.
    You just need to approach it in the right way.

    It'll be far easier to be taught it, as opposed to teaching it to yourself (self-teaching.)(I would think so anyway, but I don't have much experience on that matter.)

    Providing you identify patterns, and the similarities w/ English, you should be fine learning it (I don't see many people doing this anyway.)

    If you do start, and if you need help, ask me (although I won't be 100% correct, I've had 100% in the essay parts of my test before. My strongpoint is grammar. However, if I was to do French on the other hand, I'd get an awful grade/mark. Any innate ability seems to be very much tailored to a specific language.)
 
 
 
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