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Do you think companies should provide a simplified Ts&Cs for consumers? watch

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    Every organisation, company and website that requires you to become a member has you sign a contract or accept terms and conditions however, very few people if any read the wordy document. This is a good way to get caught into a bad trap. Organisations know this however and yet have made little attempt to cater to the consumer.

    It is because of this that I think companies should create two sets of terms and conditions: the traditional wordy document and a second concise document composed of no more than (let's say) five paragraphs the tell you in as few words as the main points to consider before joining.
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    Terms and Conditions are essentially contracts and therefore need to be written in concise language so that they cannot be misconstrued.
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    (Original post by DiddyDec)
    Terms and Conditions are essentially contracts and therefore need to be written in concise language so that they cannot be misconstrued.
    Unfortunately if we read every privacy policy we agreed to, we'd spend 76 working days every year doing just that. And that's just privacy policies!

    Providing concise bullet points of the key sentences in T's & C's (common sense required) would surely be better than what people do at the moment, i.e.nothing at all?
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    (Original post by Viva Emptiness)
    Unfortunately if we read every privacy policy we agreed to, we'd spend 76 working days every year doing just that. And that's just privacy policies!

    Providing concise bullet points of the key sentences in T's & C's (common sense required) would surely be better than what people do at the moment, i.e.nothing at all?
    Exactly. It does feel that at times it's companies taking advantage of people. Even if people did read it all what are the odds that they would understand it all? Not to mention how much would actually sink in?
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    (Original post by TheWorldEndsWithYou)
    Exactly. It does feel that at times it's companies taking advantage of people. Even if people did read it all what are the odds that they would understand it all? Not to mention how much would actually sink in?
    Terms of a contract have to be certain thus you can't have a legally binding contract where people are only shown some of the terms


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    T&Cs are just information overload. If we have documents people routinely don't read, I almost wonder what the point in them is. And we're made to sign up to them all the time.

    Yes, they need to be concise and all that but at some point you have to also wonder why they're never written for the audience intended.

    So, yes. It'd help them more as well because it's not an open and shut case when someone complains about something in a contract. The company can no longer say 'you should have read the fine print' when it's common knowledge it'd take up an unrealistic amount of time to both read and understand.
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    (Original post by chickenonsteroids)
    T&Cs are just information overload. If we have documents people routinely don't read, I almost wonder what the point in them is. And we're made to sign up to them all the time.

    Yes, they need to be concise and all that but at some point you have to also wonder why they're never written for the audience intended.

    So, yes. It'd help them more as well because it's not an open and shut case when someone complains about something in a contract. The company can no longer say 'you should have read the fine print' when it's common knowledge it'd take up an unrealistic amount of time to both read and understand.
    They're written to cover the companies arse, they need to make sure they contain everything


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    (Original post by Underscore__)
    They're written to cover the companies arse, they need to make sure they contain everything


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    I appreciate that but as I said, most people don't read it so it's more difficult to just say 'read the fine print next time'. For example this article says:

    If a company rejects your insurance claim and points to the small print, there's every chance that the Financial Ombudsman Service will take your side if you appeal. By and large, the burden is still on companies to show that they did everything they could to flag the main snags and catches with their product at the time it was bought. Burying traps in the small print is – rightly – not considered by the ombudsman to be treating your customer fairly.
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    (Original post by chickenonsteroids)
    I appreciate that but as I said, most people don't read it so it's more difficult to just say 'read the fine print next time'. For example this article says:
    I acknowledge that, it's called the red hand rule (the harsher the term the more notice you have to give). The financial ombudsman won't be on your side if you've just been lazy and not read the terms


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    (Original post by Underscore__)
    I acknowledge that, it's called the red hand rule (the harsher the term the more notice you have to give). The financial ombudsman won't be on your side if you've just been lazy and not read the terms


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    Fair. That makes good sense.

    So what do you think should be done about the problem (given there is one)?
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    (Original post by chickenonsteroids)
    Fair. That makes good sense.

    So what do you think should be done about the problem (given there is one)?
    I think there should be some regulation in consumer terms where money or personal information is given. Companies can just repeat information or fill large spaces with nonsense to make people apprehensive about reading terms because the document looks so long.


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