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    I understand that it must be a jump from GCSE Physics, therefore will require more time and effort but how hard is it to get an A grade in?
    I really want to become a mechanical engineer and understand that Physics is basically essential, so I really need some answers!
    My brother has recently started his A levels and one of which is Physics. He told me that his first lesson was extremely difficult and that it was supposed to be "The Basics of Physics". This shocked me a bit as he is really good at most subjects in general and had an A in GCSE Science and additional science.

    [I had a B in GCSE Physics]

    So is A-level Physics really difficult? and is expecting an A grade from it a bit too high?
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    It certainly isn't a walk in the park, some of the content can be tricky and the mark schemes are very specific. But it can be enjoyable once you get your head round the theory and start applying it in practice questions. In the end it all depends on how much effort you're wiling to put in.
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    (Original post by Stoicism)
    It certainly isn't a walk in the park, some of the content can be tricky and the mark schemes are very specific. But it can be enjoyable once you get your head round the theory and start applying it in practice questions. In the end it all depends on how much effort you're wiling to put in.
    Thanks for the reply!
    That really helps because I find that I can learn the methods etc. quite easy but struggle applying it all in the exams/questions. So I guess I will go for it and see how it turns out.
    Thanks again!
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    What exam board would you be doing?

    I did edexcel and for someone who was never naturally good at physics it took me a while to grasp concepts and apply them logically to questions but you get there in the end. It took me both years as I achieved a B at AS and then an A* at A2 so it's all down to practice and the time you can put in but it's definitely doable. Helps if you're strong at maths as well. Hope this helps
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    (Original post by cleverclogs_)
    I understand that it must be a jump from GCSE Physics, therefore will require more time and effort but how hard is it to get an A grade in?
    I really want to become a mechanical engineer and understand that Physics is basically essential, so I really need some answers!
    My brother has recently started his A levels and one of which is Physics. He told me that his first lesson was extremely difficult and that it was supposed to be "The Basics of Physics". This shocked me a bit as he is really good at most subjects in general and had an A in GCSE Science and additional science.

    [I had a B in GCSE Physics]

    So is A-level Physics really difficult? and is expecting an A grade from it a bit too high?
    The concepts are definitely a jump from GCSE, and you need to be a lot better at maths than in GCSE. However, I think it's definitely do-able!
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    Exam questions are more about applying something in the exams, GCSE was like: explain or what is. In AQA you should get a sheet of equations though some won't be on there, you will be expected a lot of the time to apply equations but rearranged.
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    (Original post by iceangel8)
    What exam board would you be doing?

    I did edexcel and for someone who was never naturally good at physics it took me a while to grasp concepts and apply them logically to questions but you get there in the end. It took me both years as I achieved a B at AS and then an A* at A2 so it's all down to practice and the time you can put in but it's definitely doable. Helps if you're strong at maths as well. Hope this helps
    Thanks so much!
    Im not quite sure but I think it might be Edexcel as well. I really want to do it and I think I can if I put the time and effort in. I don't think I'm that bad at maths but I really do need to put more effort in now as this is my last GCSE year.
    Again, thank you!!


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    (Original post by halfhearted)
    The concepts are definitely a jump from GCSE, and you need to be a lot better at maths than in GCSE. However, I think it's definitely do-able!
    Hopefully! I think I will go for it as I'm not that bad at maths, I will just have to put in a lot more effort!


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    (Original post by Vikingninja)
    Exam questions are more about applying something in the exams, GCSE was like: explain or what is. In AQA you should get a sheet of equations though some won't be on there, you will be expected a lot of the time to apply equations but rearranged.
    Thanks for answering!
    That really helps me now as I know what to expect! I think I prefer to rearrange equations as I have practiced some in previous Physics lessons but I do understand that it is going to be a big jump.
    Thanks!


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    (Original post by cleverclogs_)
    I understand that it must be a jump from GCSE Physics, therefore will require more time and effort but how hard is it to get an A grade in?
    I really want to become a mechanical engineer and understand that Physics is basically essential, so I really need some answers!
    My brother has recently started his A levels and one of which is Physics. He told me that his first lesson was extremely difficult and that it was supposed to be "The Basics of Physics". This shocked me a bit as he is really good at most subjects in general and had an A in GCSE Science and additional science.

    [I had a B in GCSE Physics]

    So is A-level Physics really difficult? and is expecting an A grade from it a bit too high?
    I did OCR A Physics and I managed to get an A at AS. One of the modules was really maths based so I didn't find it too bad - depends how strong you are in maths. The other half was really quite difficult. It was all about electrons and waves. Strangely, I did better in that exam. Overall though, I really enjoyed it, and I didn't take triple science. It is a jump from GCSE to AS, and even harder from AS to A2, but definitely worth it! If I were you, I'd do it. Hope this helps.
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    (Original post by iceangel8)
    What exam board would you be doing?

    I did edexcel and for someone who was never naturally good at physics it took me a while to grasp concepts and apply them logically to questions but you get there in the end. It took me both years as I achieved a B at AS and then an A* at A2 so it's all down to practice and the time you can put in but it's definitely doable. Helps if you're strong at maths as well. Hope this helps
    I also got a B at AS physics but not sure whether to stick with it for A2. Seeing your story gives me hope, all I need is an A minimum. Should I stick with it?
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    If you really enjoy Physics, it's not that difficult really. Would strongly recommend taking Mathematics if you are taking Physics. The two subjects slot very nicely into each other, and doing Maths makes the maths involved in Physics a walk in the park, so you can devote more time to studying the principles, information and skills you'll need to learn.

    Though if you want to get into engineering, you'll probably know already how essential Maths is as well as Physics :P
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    (Original post by sez0603)
    I did OCR A Physics and I managed to get an A at AS. One of the modules was really maths based so I didn't find it too bad - depends how strong you are in maths. The other half was really quite difficult. It was all about electrons and waves. Strangely, I did better in that exam. Overall though, I really enjoyed it, and I didn't take triple science. It is a jump from GCSE to AS, and even harder from AS to A2, but definitely worth it! If I were you, I'd do it. Hope this helps.
    Thanks you so much!!
    I think I am going to go for it as I'm not that bad at maths, so I think it is possible for me to get a good outcome from it. Hopefully I'll do well!
    Thanks again
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    (Original post by SheLikeTheMango)
    I also got a B at AS physics but not sure whether to stick with it for A2. Seeing your story gives me hope, all I need is an A minimum. Should I stick with it?
    I think you should just go for it!
    After reading all these replies, I've found that the hardest parts are easy to overcome if you just put in the effort and time.
    If you're quite good at mathsit should hopefully be slightly easier for you.
    Wish you all the best!
    Good luck!!
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    (Original post by cleverclogs_)
    I understand that it must be a jump from GCSE Physics, therefore will require more time and effort but how hard is it to get an A grade in?
    I really want to become a mechanical engineer and understand that Physics is basically essential, so I really need some answers!
    My brother has recently started his A levels and one of which is Physics. He told me that his first lesson was extremely difficult and that it was supposed to be "The Basics of Physics". This shocked me a bit as he is really good at most subjects in general and had an A in GCSE Science and additional science.

    [I had a B in GCSE Physics]

    So is A-level Physics really difficult? and is expecting an A grade from it a bit too high?
    I found the initial gap from GCSE the smallest out of all of my subjects. There are some difficult concepts at the end of AS. A2 has some more difficult concepts still but on the whole it's not too difficult. One of my easier A-levels.
    The maths involved is often very simple compared with A-level maths.
    Do lots of practice questions.

    Your brother may have found the first lesson very difficult because he only took double science. A lot of the concepts covered in the first few lessons will have been covered in triple science at a much slower pace, however they are new to him because he took double. Within a few lessons, the headstart will be much smaller and the lessons should be easier for him.

    I got an A* at GCSE and just missed the A* at A-level(practical assessments).
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    (Original post by Guthix)
    If you really enjoy Physics, it's not that difficult really. Would strongly recommend taking Mathematics if you are taking Physics. The two subjects slot very nicely into each other, and doing Maths makes the maths involved in Physics a walk in the park, so you can devote more time to studying the principles, information and skills you'll need to learn.

    Though if you want to get into engineering, you'll probably know already how essential Maths is as well as Physics :P
    Thanks so much!
    I was planning on taking Maths alongside it as I read that it was an essential part. Great advice though!!
    Hopefully now I can start to apply myself more and achieve what I want!
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    (Original post by morgan8002)
    I found the initial gap from GCSE the smallest out of all of my subjects. There are some difficult concepts at the end of AS. A2 has some more difficult concepts still but on the whole it's not too difficult. One of my easier A-levels.
    The maths involved is often very simple compared with A-level maths.
    Do lots of practice questions.

    Your brother may have found the first lesson very difficult because he only took double science. A lot of the concepts covered in the first few lessons will have been covered in triple science at a much slower pace, however they are new to him because he took double. Within a few lessons, the headstart will be much smaller and the lessons should be easier for him.

    I got an A* at GCSE and just missed the A* at A-level(practical assessments).
    Some great advice, thanks so much!
    I think I am going to take Physics as an A level alongside Maths.
    Also, what you said makes complete sense with my brother! Thanks you so much for explaining it!
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    (Original post by cleverclogs_)
    Some great advice, thanks so much!
    I think I am going to take Physics as an A level alongside Maths.
    Also, what you said makes complete sense with my brother! Thanks you so much for explaining it!
    Also consider further maths. It'll help with your structural engineering application and will cover some of the maths you'll need when you get there, but is not usually required.
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    (Original post by morgan8002)
    Also consider further maths. It'll help with your structural engineering application and will cover some of the maths you'll need when you get there, but is not usually required.
    My school only allow us to take 3 A levels plus Welsh Baccularate, so I was wondering what A-levels would you recommend me taking?
    I could always ask for extra tutoring for further maths and then pay to be entered into the exam, that way I can still take three options and gain an extra fourth.
    But I was wondering, do you know what the preferred options are for a mechanical engineer?
    Again thanks for the great advice!!
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    (Original post by cleverclogs_)
    My school only allow us to take 3 A levels plus Welsh Baccularate, so I was wondering what A-levels would you recommend me taking?
    I could always ask for extra tutoring for further maths and then pay to be entered into the exam, that way I can still take three options and gain an extra fourth.
    But I was wondering, do you know what the preferred options are for a mechanical engineer?
    Again thanks for the great advice!!
    Sorry, I read structural.
    Same through. Maths and physics are required or recommended if only one is required. Further maths is recommended.

    You should take maths and physics. You should think about whether to take further maths and/or whatever other subject(s) you want to study for the sake of themselves.
    What other subjects are you thinking of?
 
 
 
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