Mike Ross232
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I am a year 13 currently studying As levels in Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Business studies. My GCSEs where pretty poor with 2A*s, 5As and 3Bs, two of the Bs being in English Language and Literature. I am wondering what are the entry requirements to study veterinary medicine in terms of GCSE grades, As level grades, A level grades, work experience, voluntary work and if there is an admissions test or interview to get in to any vetinary schools? I am also considering dropping the physics AS level and I am wondering will that have a significant difference in my chances of getting in which, now are already probably very slim? All feedback and advice is very much appreciated
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Little Tail Chaser
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Look in the sticky 'Veterinary Medicine RESOURCES THREAD' at the top of the forum. That has links to the GCSE and A Level requirements for D100 at all UK vet schools, as well as many other web pages that you may find helpful in your research. Long story short though those GCSEs are perfectly fine (and I'm not sure on which planet they'd classify as 'poor', they're great!). A Level requirements are between A*A*A and AAB.

Work experience requirements vary. Cambridge have no formal requirements, while Liverpool ask for 10 weeks. Realistically you want 15-20+ weeks of varied experience (e.g. small and large animal vets, stables, kennels/catteries, farms, lambing, labs, abattoirs, zoos, pet shops etc) to compete with other applicants. Consider that many people apply after taking a gap year, so will have more work experience. I'd suggest giving the 'Big And Shiny Work Experience Bible' (also at the top of the forum) a read.

Cambridge and the Royal Veterinary College ask applicants to sit the Bio-Medical Admissions Test (BMAT) exam. This is sat in November and has sections based on puzzle solving, science and maths, and an essay. Plenty of information and past papers available online.

All veterinary schools interview. Interviews are held between November and March. Universities are increasingly using the MMI format. You'll be asked to reflect on work experience, discuss opportunities within the veterinary career and possibly carry out numeracy and practical tasks. You'll also be asked questions based on your personal statement and work experience questionnaires.

Dropping physics will have no affect on your chances, other than at Cambridge as they ask for a third science. Other vet schools don't mind what your third subject is, the grade you get is what matters.

I'll be honest, if you're only asking these questions now then it's very unlikely that you're going to be ready to apply for 2016 entry. If you're serious about this then a gap year is probably the way forward.
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Mike Ross232
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(Original post by Little Tail Chaser)
Look in the sticky 'Veterinary Medicine RESOURCES THREAD' at the top of the forum. That has links to the GCSE and A Level requirements for D100 at all UK vet schools, as well as many other web pages that you may find helpful in your research. Long story short though those GCSEs are perfectly fine (and I'm not sure on which planet they'd classify as 'poor', they're great!). A Level requirements are between A*A*A and AAB.

Work experience requirements vary. Cambridge have no formal requirements, while Liverpool ask for 10 weeks. Realistically you want 15-20+ weeks of varied experience (e.g. small and large animal vets, stables, kennels/catteries, farms, lambing, labs, abattoirs, zoos, pet shops etc) to compete with other applicants. Consider that many people apply after taking a gap year, so will have more work experience. I'd suggest giving the 'Big And Shiny Work Experience Bible' (also at the top of the forum) a read.

Cambridge and the Royal Veterinary College ask applicants to sit the Bio-Medical Admissions Test (BMAT) exam. This is sat in November and has sections based on puzzle solving, science and maths, and an essay. Plenty of information and past papers available online.

All veterinary schools interview. Interviews are held between November and March. Universities are increasingly using the MMI format. You'll be asked to reflect on work experience, discuss opportunities within the veterinary career and possibly carry out numeracy and practical tasks. You'll also be asked questions based on your personal statement and work experience questionnaires.

Dropping physics will have no affect on your chances, other than at Cambridge as they ask for a third science. Other vet schools don't mind what your third subject is, the grade you get is what matters.

I'll be honest, if you're only asking these questions now then it's very unlikely that you're going to be ready to apply for 2016 entry. If you're serious about this then a gap year is probably the way forward.
I'm in 6th year in Northern Ireland, I'm only after getting my GCSE results in August, cheers for the reply. In regards to work experience, I live on one of my grandfather's farms and have been working with animals such as sheep and horses all my life, but this has only been with my father and grandfather, can i use this as work experience or will they expect me to go out to some other farmer who's not related to me for a placement? I can also get work experience with a family friend who breaks in horses and i think i can get a few weeks work experience with large and small animal vets, but will i need 15 to 20 weeks work experience on various farms, kennels etc even though I have grown up on a farm and been in contact with animals since i was a child?
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Little Tail Chaser
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(Original post by Mike Ross232)
I'm in 6th year in Northern Ireland, I'm only after getting my GCSE results in August, cheers for the reply. In regards to work experience, I live on one of my grandfather's farms and have been working with animals such as sheep and horses all my life, but this has only been with my father and grandfather, can i use this as work experience or will they expect me to go out to some other farmer who's not related to me for a placement? I can also get work experience with a family friend who breaks in horses and i think i can get a few weeks work experience with large and small animal vets, but will i need 15 to 20 weeks work experience on various farms, kennels etc even though I have grown up on a farm and been in contact with animals since i was a child?
They expect you to work on places outside of your home environment, so no, you can't count work on your grandfather's farm. It wouldn't be fair on people who aren't so fortunate if they did count it. You're still at an advantage, though . I imagine that you have plenty of contacts (other farms, large animal vets), plus you already know how to do a lot of the things that other people learn on these placements, so you have a bit of a head start there.
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