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    Would I have a chance to do Medicine with these A Levels:
    Chemistry
    Biology
    German
    French
    I could do Maths AS Level( predicted grade at GCSE is A*). Would this increase my chances of getting into medicine? Is AS Maths hard? (exam board: Edexcel)
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    Personally I found maths hard but one of the reasons why is probably because i did mechanics in my first year in college.
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    i think you should also do either maths or physics to make you a stronger candidate.
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    AS Maths will increase your chances in getting in, even though it's not a requirement.

    Edexcel AS Maths is piss. Do it.
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    (Original post by AuroraU)
    Would I have a chance to do Medicine with these A Levels:
    Chemistry
    Biology
    German
    French
    I could do Maths AS Level( predicted grade at GCSE is A*). Would this increase my chances of getting into medicine? Is AS Maths hard? (exam board: Edexcel)
    Those are absolutely fine choices - you don't need maths or physics to get in, they won't increase your chances. Only do them if you want to. And ignore the two users I have quoted below, they don't know what they're talking about.


    (Original post by mishmoshmogo)
    i think you should also do either maths or physics to make you a stronger candidate.
    (Original post by RMNDK)
    AS Maths will increase your chances in getting in, even though it's not a requirement.

    Edexcel AS Maths is piss. Do it.
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    Your current combination is fine. Doing Maths would also be fine.

    Difficulty is very subjective - it depends what your personal strengths are.
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    Ignore the two users I have quoted below, they don't know what they're talking about.
    Maths is a desirable A-Level, and not just for Medicine, for many, if not nearly all science-based degrees. You do stand a slightly stronger position, given that you actually do attain a good grade in it of course.

    And I did Edexcel Maths and have been doing so for years. It really is easy, so I do know what I'm talking about.
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    (Original post by RMNDK)
    Maths is a desirable A-Level, and not just for Medicine, for many, if not nearly all science-based degrees. You do stand a slightly stronger position, given that you actually do attain a good grade in it of course.
    I got into medical school, so my advice outranks yours in this particular thread. What you're saying is simply not correct - doing maths A level will make no difference, otherwise the medical schools would say so. Now, please stop posting misleading advice here.

    And I did Edexcel Maths and have been doing so for years. It really is easy, so I do know what I'm talking about.
    If I ever find myself caring about exam boards again, rest assured you'll be the first person I send a message to.
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    I got into medical school, so my advice outranks yours in this particular thread. What you're saying is simply not correct - doing maths A level will make no difference, otherwise the medical schools would say so. Now, please stop posting misleading advice here.



    If I ever find myself caring about exam boards again, rest assured you'll be the first person I send a message to.
    I also got into medical school and a few of the medical schools that I looked at, as well as ones that I applied to commented that students doing three science subjects (bio, chem, phys, maths) are stronger candidates. Some even wanted chemistry and TWO other sciences at AS. In these cases not doing maths or physics would not only put you at a disadvantage but rule out the school COMPLETELY!!

    To the OP, look at schools first before you decide, there are a few styles of medicine course and you need to decide which suits you, look at the uni's that offer that type and then their requirements before deciding. I would recommend doing either physics or maths to keep your options open, equally doing a contrasting subject can be beneficial, UCL for example needs this and it's something good to talk about at any interviews you might have. Good luck with your application!!


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    (Original post by Democracy)
    I got into medical school, so my advice outranks yours in this particular thread.
    The medical schools do say so. At least that's what admissions officers and several grads tell me, and many other people, and who knows how many more. If I'm misleading, then there are hundreds of other people who've now been misled. It's statistically in your favour to do Maths A Level, it helps in so many degrees, including Medicine where recently grads failed to show even basic numeracy skills (which is potentially life-threatening)

    I'm sure, however, that you won't be needing to care for exam boards for now.
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    (Original post by Treeniebop)
    I also got into medical school and a few of the medical schools that I looked at, as well as ones that I applied to commented that students doing three science subjects (bio, chem, phys, maths) are stronger candidates. Some even wanted chemistry and TWO other sciences at AS. In these cases not doing maths or physics would not only put you at a disadvantage but rule out the school COMPLETELY!!
    Which medical schools were these?

    (Original post by RMNDK)
    The medical schools do say so. At least that's what admissions officers and several grads tell me, and many other people, and who knows how many more. If I'm misleading, then there are hundreds of other people who've now been misled. It's statistically in your favour to do Maths A Level, it helps in so many degrees, including Medicine where recently grads failed to show even basic numeracy skills (which is potentially life-threatening)

    I'm sure, however, that you won't be needing to care for exam boards for now.
    Seriously, do you have any sources whatsoever to back your claims up?

    "statistically in your favour" - eh? Presumably you have these stats then?

    Maths A level doesn't demonstrate that one has basic numeracy skills - you don't need anywhere near that level of mathematical knowledge to be able to do well as a doctor. Though again, where's your source for that final bit about graduates failing to show basic numeracy skills?
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    Which medical schools were these?



    Seriously, do you have any sources whatsoever to back your claims up?

    "statistically in your favour" - eh? Presumably you have these stats then?

    Maths A level doesn't demonstrate that one has basic numeracy skills - you don't need anywhere near that level of mathematical knowledge to be able to do well as a doctor. Though again, where's your source for that final bit about graduates failing to show basic numeracy skills?
    I never really took a transcript of my conversations with them. But they told me, and unfortunately many others, that while they don't reference maths as being a necessary requirement to Medicine since they'd much rather have Chemistry, and sometimes Biology, they do value AS Mathematics. (Keele told me A2 as well) They phrased it as if you're not disadvantaged if you didn't take it, it's just, you're more likable, which doesn't really add up. Of course I haven't scoured every single med school in the country to make a solid conclusion, but I've talked to all the Unis and enough people to get the gist.

    Of course I don't have any stats. But it really does make sense to take Maths to A Level since GCSE's don't go far enough. Even the House of Lords was suggesting it to be compulsory some years ago. Science employers don't really demand it cos the demand isn't high enough, they really value maths, but people are put off by it.

    Just check it, there are several stories in the news of some shocking results of grad students and even doctors who've been working for some time that failed basic numeracy. There was this doctor back in Scotland that gave the wrong amount of drugs because he couldn't multiply factors and divide the day up into intervals. Thankfully the overdose wasn't lethal. I went to a Keele Med Talk on this and they again highlighted that numeracy was dwindling in medicine.
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    (Original post by RMNDK)
    I never really took a transcript of my conversations with them. But they told me, and unfortunately many others, that while they don't reference maths as being a necessary requirement to Medicine since they'd much rather have Chemistry, and sometimes Biology, they do value AS Mathematics. (Keele told me A2 as well) They phrased it as if you're not disadvantaged if you didn't take it, it's just, you're more likable, which doesn't really add up. Of course I haven't scoured every single med school in the country to make a solid conclusion, but I've talked to all the Unis and enough people to get the gist.

    Of course I don't have any stats. But it really does make sense to take Maths to A Level since GCSE's don't go far enough. Even the House of Lords was suggesting it to be compulsory some years ago. Science employers don't really demand it cos the demand isn't high enough, they really value maths, but people are put off by it.

    Just check it, there are several stories in the news of some shocking results of grad students and even doctors who've been working for some time that failed basic numeracy. There was this doctor back in Scotland that gave the wrong amount of drugs because he couldn't multiply factors and divide the day up into intervals. Thankfully the overdose wasn't lethal. I went to a Keele Med Talk on this and they again highlighted that numeracy was dwindling in medicine.
    Yeah, this all sounds really wishy washy - loads of anecdotes and waffle but no substance. If medicine is anything, it should be evidence based - I haven't ever seen any evidence to suggest that doing maths A level makes you a "stronger" candidate. And even if this was the case, why would the medical schools be so keen on keeping it a secret and not making it a part of the entry requirements?

    GCSEs don't go far enough? What exactly is it that you think we learn in medical school that we'd require advanced maths skills to be able to cope with it? Do you think patients give a monkey's about whether or not we know how to do calculus or differentiation? :confused:

    Medicine isn't a "science degree" and the NHS is not a "science employer", just fyi.
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    I apologise, now that the number of AS levels has been reduced to 3 by the government 3 science AS are no longer needed. However in my cycle they were. I know for Sheffield, Oxford and UCL when I applied for them I needed three science AS. Other medical schools that I looked at, including Cardiff and Bristol, also encouraged it at open days although it wasn't a requirement.

    OP: The only thing I would say is that if you are doing 4 then taking maths/physics might help because if you only need A level chemistry and one other science then it gives you more room for mistakes at AS as you wouldn't need to carry both on.


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    Here is a link to Med School A level requirements:

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/cont...el-requirement

    There is absolutely no need to take Maths or Physics at A level unless you want to, or are applying to Imperial or Cambridge. In fact, many other Med Schools state that a contrasting subject is looked upon favourably. Most Med Schools are open and transparent about their selection criteria and do not have time to sift through those taking Maths versus those not taking Maths giving the former some secret hidden extra ranking points. Take a 3rd A2 that you enjoy and think you will get good results in
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    Yeah, this all sounds really wishy washy - loads of anecdotes and waffle but no substance. If medicine is anything, it should be evidence based - I haven't ever seen any evidence to suggest that doing maths A level makes you a "stronger" candidate.

    GCSEs don't go far enough? What exactly is it that you think we learn in medical school that we'd require advanced maths skills to be able to cope with it? Do you think patients give a monkey's about whether or not we know how to do calculus or differentiation? :confused:

    Medicine isn't a "science degree" and the NHS is not a "science employer", just fyi.
    I don't see how much more "substance" you require. The anecdotes detail exactly what the med schools say. I'm a customer of the Uni, and I've learnt of the entry requirements directly from the consumer. Evidence based is as far as it goes. If you're looking for more like, x% of people get in with Maths A level compared to the y% that got in without it, then no I have not offered that. But clearly they don't. They've qualitatively described that it makes you a stronger candidate.

    It's not the concepts that you learn in AS, althogh, if I were a patient, I'd love to listen to any ramble on u-sub and euler hehe, oh the joys. It'd be a bit out of the blue for some GP to suddenly revisit his/her high school eras but I'd share that moment. Anyways, it's the thought processes and the advancement in the level of critical thinking you have. From simply loci, to some beastly integral, AS and A2 challenges you with a level of analysis that would benefit medical students.
    I never said the NHS was a science employer, I only said science employer. So it was a general term. And medicine is an applied science degree, or not. more I think of it, the more I think my thinking is like Schrodinger's kittycat. Or Pauli.
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    Be aware that Physics will be somewhat difficult without doing maths
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    (Original post by RMNDK)
    I don't see how much more "substance" you require. The anecdotes detail exactly what the med schools say. I'm a customer of the Uni, and I've learnt of the entry requirements directly from the consumer. Evidence based is as far as it goes. If you're looking for more like, x% of people get in with Maths A level compared to the y% that got in without it, then no I have not offered that. But clearly they don't. They've qualitatively described that it makes you a stronger candidate.
    Yes, and the stated entry requirements don't say anywhere that doing maths will increase your chances of getting in. Go back and read them again, then tell me some more about that "qualitative description" :rolleyes:

    It's not the concepts that you learn in AS, althogh, if I were a patient, I'd love to listen to any ramble on u-sub and euler hehe, oh the joys. It'd be a bit out of the blue for some GP to suddenly revisit his/her high school eras but I'd share that moment. Anyways, it's the thought processes and the advancement in the level of critical thinking you have. From simply loci, to some beastly integral, AS and A2 challenges you with a level of analysis that would benefit medical students.
    I never said the NHS was a science employer, I only said science employer. So it was a general term. And medicine is an applied science degree, or not. more I think of it, the more I think my thinking is like Schrodinger's kittycat. Or Pauli.
    This is true for any rigorous subject though, so again, no particular advantage will be gained by doing maths.

    You like maths. Fair enough, we get it. But stop posting rubbish advice. And for the record "I talked to an admissions tutor on open day who told me blah blah" is only a step up from "well my uncle knew a guy who got into med school with no A levels whatsoever" - that's not how we give advice on here.
 
 
 
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