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    Ok!
    I am currently doing my A levels in the UK. I am doing 4 A-levels:
    a) Biology
    b) Psychology
    c) Politics and Government
    d) History

    My predicted grades are: A* in Bio, A* Politics and Govt., A in History and a B in Psychology.

    I do not have any GCSEs due to the fact I lived in the Ukraine at the time. I was accepted to the sixth form college based on the grade transcript from my ex school in the Ukraine.

    My ambition is to study law. I have always had an interest in the legal systems (esp in the british one). I chose Politics and Govt. so I could be "equipped" with the basic knowledge of the political system in the UK

    I did some mock LNAT past papers and got good scores. The only question I have might be a little bit weird. Is Psychology considered a "Mickey Mouse" subject? I know law schools look for rigorous academic subjects and I am just wondering if Psychology was a bad choice.
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    (Original post by alexandercrowth)
    Ok!
    I am currently doing my A levels in the UK. I am doing 4 A-levels:
    a) Biology
    b) Psychology
    c) Politics and Government
    d) History

    My predicted grades are: A* in Bio, A* Politics and Govt., A in History and a B in Psychology.

    I do not have any GCSEs due to the fact I lived in the Ukraine at the time. I was accepted to the sixth form college based on the grade transcript from my ex school in the Ukraine.

    My ambition is to study law. I have always had an interest in the legal systems (esp in the british one). I chose Politics and Govt. so I could be "equipped" with the basic knowledge of the political system in the UK

    I did some mock LNAT past papers and got good scores. The only question I have might be a little bit weird. Is Psychology considered a "Mickey Mouse" subject? I know law schools look for rigorous academic subjects and I am just wondering if Psychology was a bad choice.
    Nope - psychology is an academic subject so it's perfectly okay. It's the non academic and more practical subjects like art and design which might raise questions.


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    (Original post by alexandercrowth)
    Ok!
    I am currently doing my A levels in the UK. I am doing 4 A-levels:
    a) Biology
    b) Psychology
    c) Politics and Government
    d) History

    My predicted grades are: A* in Bio, A* Politics and Govt., A in History and a B in Psychology.

    I do not have any GCSEs due to the fact I lived in the Ukraine at the time. I was accepted to the sixth form college based on the grade transcript from my ex school in the Ukraine.

    My ambition is to study law. I have always had an interest in the legal systems (esp in the british one). I chose Politics and Govt. so I could be "equipped" with the basic knowledge of the political system in the UK

    I did some mock LNAT past papers and got good scores. The only question I have might be a little bit weird. Is Psychology considered a "Mickey Mouse" subject? I know law schools look for rigorous academic subjects and I am just wondering if Psychology was a bad choice.
    I can't answer your question, but do be aware that if you were planning on studying at a UK university to get student finance you would need indefinite leave to remain or be a UK national and have lived in the UK 3 years.
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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    I can't answer your question, but do be aware that if you were planning on studying at a UK university to get student finance you would need indefinite leave to remain or be a UK national and have lived in the UK 3 years.
    I am a UK national...but I have only lived in the UK for 1 year :O But I have a british passport
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    (Original post by alexandercrowth)
    I am a UK national...but I have only lived in the UK for 1 year :O But I have a british passport
    Having a passport on its own is not sufficient, you/your family need to be paying taxes here to qualify- you need to have lived here for 3 years for reasons other than getting an education e.g. you came to work or your parents came to work here.If you can prove your absence was temporary and you moved back for reasons other than to get an education then you'll be fine, otherwise some unis will classify you as an international student and student finance won't be able to give you a penny until you've lived here for 3 years for reasons other than for education.
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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    Having a passport on its own is not sufficient, you/your family need to be paying taxes here to qualify- you need to have lived here for 3 years for reasons other than getting an education e.g. you came to work or your parents came to work here.If you can prove your absence was temporary and you moved back for reasons other than to get an education then you'll be fine, otherwise some unis will classify you as an international student and student finance won't be able to give you a penny until you've lived here for 3 years for reasons other than for education.
    what about student loan?
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    (Original post by alexandercrowth)
    what about student loan?
    student finance are the people who provide student loans. Take a gap year and as long as you came back here because of your parents work then you'll be fine.
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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    student finance are the people who provide student loans. Take a gap year and as long as you came back here because of your parents work then you'll be fine.
    I now calculated the total time I lived here. It hasn't been 2 years even -_-
    It is so degrading how the UK govt. treats expats. We are british citizens with british passports but yet we are treated as citizens from a third world country.

    What about Scotland, Ireland (Republic) ? I hear there are no fees there or that the fees are much lower than in England. I have dual citizenship (Slovenia and the UK)
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    (Original post by alexandercrowth)
    I now calculated the total time I lived here. It hasn't been 2 years even -_-
    It is so degrading how the UK govt. treats expats. We are british citizens with british passports but yet we are treated as citizens from a third world country.

    What about Scotland, Ireland (Republic) ? I hear there are no fees there or that the fees are much lower than in England. I have dual citizenship (Slovenia and the UK)
    It's fair because it rewards those who either have themselves or their parents have paid their taxes in this country.
    As with Scotland its residence not nationality that counts, you'd need to live in Scotland or mainland EU for 3 years to get free tuition. As it stands if the university classified you as a home student you'd pay £9,000 a year, otherwise it would be the international rate- at Edinburgh this starts at £15,000, less prestigious universities may charge less. And the course is 4 years not 3.

    To get your tuition fees paid for in ROI you would need to have lived in the EU for 3 years before you start the course and you are only eligible for maintainance support if you live in Ireland already. If the uni classifies you as an international student you'd be paying 17,000 euros at Trinity Dublin as an example, whilst if you were classified as a home student you would pay 5,000 euros.

    Also on top of that remember that law is different in different countries, even within the UK, unless you study English/Welsh law you'd have to convert before you could embark on the baristers or soliitors qualifying courses.

    If your absence wasn't temporary then your best bet by far is taking two years out, work and save up and you'll be in a much better position than most when you start uni anyway.
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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    It's fair because it rewards those who either have themselves or their parents have paid their taxes in this country.
    As with Scotland its residence not nationality that counts, you'd need to live in Scotland or mainland EU for 3 years to get free tuition. As it stands if the university classified you as a home student you'd pay £9,000 a year, otherwise it would be the international rate- at Edinburgh this starts at £15,000, less prestigious universities may charge less. And the course is 4 years not 3.

    To get your tuition fees paid for in ROI you would need to have lived in the EU for 3 years before you start the course and you are only eligible for maintainance support if you live in Ireland already. If the uni classifies you as an international student you'd be paying 17,000 euros at Trinity Dublin as an example, whilst if you were classified as a home student you would pay 5,000 euros.

    Also on top of that remember that law is different in different countries, even within the UK, unless you study English/Welsh law you'd have to convert before you could embark on the baristers or soliitors qualifying courses.

    If your absence wasn't temporary then your best bet by far is taking two years out, work and save up and you'll be in a much better position than most when you start uni anyway.
    Well I am a EU (Slovenian + British citizen) and have lived in Slovenia for the past 3 and a half years...so I am eligible for free tuition in Scotland. Well Expats have to pay taxes aswell! If you are a citizen of a country....you should have the same rights regardless of residence. The countries duty is to take care of their own first. Not beeing discriminatory here. This is the case in Austria and Germany.The UK had this kind of system till the Iron lady came into power and destroyed the UK for good )

    Anyways thanks for your help! I really appreciate it!
    Take care
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    (Original post by alexandercrowth)
    Well I am a EU (Slovenian + British citizen) and have lived in Slovenia for the past 3 and a half years...so I am eligible for free tuition in Scotland. Well Expats have to pay taxes aswell! If you are a citizen of a country....you should have the same rights regardless of residence. The countries duty is to take care of their own first. Not beeing discriminatory here. This is the case in Austria and Germany.The UK had this kind of system till the Iron lady came into power and destroyed the UK for good )

    Anyways thanks for your help! I really appreciate it!
    Take care
    *Lived in Slovenia (EU soil) for 3 and a half years!
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    I guess the best option for me atm is the Republic of Ireland. I am looking at UCC Law too. As I lived in the EU (in different EU countries) for the past 5 years....and the uni fees are much lower.

    Thanks for your help!
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    I've achieved 10 GCSE's from A* to B's. I was uncertain of the university degree that I was going to take during AS-level so I therefore chose to study History (A), Sociology (A), Media Studies (A) and English language (B). Now I wish to pursue a law degree. I made the decision to drop English language as many universities specifically ask for 3 A-levels and do not 4. I am expecting to achieves A's and I am hoping to take the LNAT soon.

    Are my A-levels suitable to study law at university? (Are these A-levels/grades acceptable? Are they 'normal' for a student who wants to apply to study law? I am aware that media studies can be considered a non-traditional subject)
    Should I take the EPQ? (Extended Project Qualification) or is that not necessary if I am taking LNAT?
    Any suggestions of good universities in London that would accept my A-levels?

    Thanks guys!
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    (Original post by alexandercrowth)
    Well I am a EU (Slovenian + British citizen) and have lived in Slovenia for the past 3 and a half years...so I am eligible for free tuition in Scotland. Well Expats have to pay taxes aswell! If you are a citizen of a country....you should have the same rights regardless of residence. The countries duty is to take care of their own first. Not beeing discriminatory here. This is the case in Austria and Germany.The UK had this kind of system till the Iron lady came into power and destroyed the UK for good )

    Anyways thanks for your help! I really appreciate it!
    Take care
    It has to be have been the last 3 years before you started your course, not any 3 years.
 
 
 

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