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Do students who commute tend to do worse? watch

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    I will be studying Law in my local University from Monday and I was wondering about how well students who commute tend to do. On one thread someone stated that local students tend to be more hardworking and serious however on another thread somebody stated that most drop outs tended to be commuters. This has started to make me worry now.

    Does the distance you live from the University affect this as I am guessing that the students who live far away and commute would be more stressed and likely to drop out. I don't live far from my University, It only takes me 10 minutes by car to get there and 30 minutes by bus. I also have my own office at home so I can revise in peace without distractions.

    Any advice and experience would be appreciated.
    Thanks
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    This is utter tosh. The people who do worse at uni are the people who don't put the effort in. Simple as that.

    I've seen friends who commute (failed the year), and friends who have came out with the 1st's. It's just about how much effort you're willing to put in.
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    I commute and I've been consistently on track for a first since first year. There is no generalisation that can be made about the hardworking nature of someone based on whether they commute or live at uni. The best thing about commuting is that you have the choice to go and join in with all the uni things or you can come home and take yourself away from all of the distractions. I got a lot more work done than my friends in halls did because even though they weren't always hanging out, there was always noise that I just didn't have at home.
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    I commute for 3 hours a day and I'm 7th out of 170 people on my course.
    I would not say that we tend to do worse lol.
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    I did and got a 2:1.
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    (Original post by Speak444)
    This is utter tosh. The people who do worse at uni are the people who don't put the effort in. Simple as that.

    I've seen friends who commute (failed the year), and friends who have came out with the 1st's. It's just about how much effort you're willing to put in.
    Best response! I commute and I'm getting a high 2:1
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    A friend on my course commuted and got a first. It's definitley possible but as others have said how well you do depends on effort not where you live.
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    Commuting can have an affect on a person's performance in my opinion. I was doing a foundation degree 6 months ago. I'd leave my Uni at 5-6 pm, and I'd arrive at home at around 8 pm (with a large load of work to do overnight + tiredness), had to wake up the next day at around 5 am to go back to uni. However, I did make a few mistakes back then, and I do believe that with effort and a proper travel routine, the work can be done.
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    (Original post by Trev97)
    I will be studying Law in my local University from Monday and I was wondering about how well students who commute tend to do. On one thread someone stated that local students tend to be more hardworking and serious however on another thread somebody stated that most drop outs tended to be commuters. This has started to make me worry now.

    Does the distance you live from the University affect this as I am guessing that the students who live far away and commute would be more stressed and likely to drop out. I don't live far from my University, It only takes me 10 minutes by car to get there and 30 minutes by bus. I also have my own office at home so I can revise in peace without distractions.

    Any advice and experience would be appreciated.
    Thanks
    t really depends on the student and how good the transport links are long commutes are killer Most people on here will tell you not to commute and I will too. In intensive courses like engineering and I hear law living at uni is such better.Public transport is subject to delays and if you drive traffic conditions can make you late some lecturers won't let you in even if your a minute late although for the most part it 15 minutes if you or the lecturer is late by more than that you miss the lecture but yeah commuters suffer delays which is why they tend to get worse results and because it's harder for them to socialise they tend to have less friends which means they are less happy thus have less motivation and as i said get worse results.that said your commute isn't too bad but yeah your more likely to do badly if you commute and with law you need to be there really because of how often you'll need the library probably better to look at halls. Oxbridge insists on students living in halls for the above reasons precisely.
    I should mention though that it does work out for some people and this is just what I think i have never commuted so i would take that in to consideration
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    (Original post by jonathanemptage)
    t really depends on the student and how good the transport links are long commutes are killer Most people on here will tell you not to commute and I will too. In intensive courses like engineering and I hear law living at uni is such better.Public transport is subject to delays and if you drive traffic conditions can make you late some lecturers won't let you in even if your a minute late although for the most part it 15 minutes if you or the lecturer is late by more than that you miss the lecture but yeah commuters suffer delays which is why they tend to get worse results and because it's harder for them to socialise they tend to have less friends which means they are less happy thus have less motivation and as i said get worse results.that said your commute isn't too bad but yeah your more likely to do badly if you commute and with law you need to be there really because of how often you'll need the library probably better to look at halls. Oxbridge insists on students living in halls for the above reasons precisely.
    I should mention though that it does work out for some people and this is just what I think i have never commuted so i would take that in to consideration
    I have to say I completely disagree.

    Being late to lectures because of bad traffic only happens in extreme circumstances/when the person hasn't left enough time to actually get there and factor in any delays.
    I commute, my uni is a 20 minute drive away and I always leave an hour before I should be there, to factor in any delays that may occur. I do this with everything though, not just uni. Most adults factor in extra time for things they have to do so that they are on time. This isn't a new concept. Rolling out of bed 10 minutes before a lecture might be great to some people, but good luck becoming accustomed to the real world when you graduate and have to wake up in decent time.

    I have never found it difficult to socialise or make friends due to my living situation. I have a wider group of friends than my friends who stayed in halls because they tended to stick with their flatmates and not bother making relationships with anyone else. I, on the other hand, didn't have the forced friendships that come with halls and was then required to make relationships with as many people as I wanted to, if I wanted to make friends.

    My motivation to do work has never come from the amount of friends I have or where I live. My motivation to do work is that I want to learn and get a good degree. The amount of friends I have isn't a direct link to my happiness either. More friends doesn't mean you are happier. I am much happier with a small, close group of friends than I am when I'm trying to be friends with absolutely everyone at the same time.

    Commuting doesn't prevent anyone from going to the library either. Nor is the library the only place a student can study. Law students primarily use cases and statutes which are mostly available online - no need to be on campus for those. Course reading can be purchased or borrowed from the library - only requires you to be on campus at the time of borrowing and returning, which could be days that you'll be there anyway.


    OP: don't listen to anyone who tries to tell you that commuting will make you less likely to succeed, especially if that person has no experience in going to uni whilst commuting anyway!
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    No.... I don't think it's related.


    I commute and one of the good things about commuting is that once you get to uni, you're likely to want to stay there for the day. Say for example if you've got a lecture at 10, and then one at 2 or 3, you could spend the time in between going to the library and getting some work done. Whereas those who live 5 mins away are all too tempted to go home and have a sneaky nap.
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    Lol , everyone commutes
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    (Original post by jonathanemptage)
    t really depends on the student and how good the transport links are long commutes are killer Most people on here will tell you not to commute and I will too. In intensive courses like engineering and I hear law living at uni is such better.Public transport is subject to delays and if you drive traffic conditions can make you late some lecturers won't let you in even if your a minute late although for the most part it 15 minutes if you or the lecturer is late by more than that you miss the lecture but yeah commuters suffer delays which is why they tend to get worse results and because it's harder for them to socialise they tend to have less friends which means they are less happy thus have less motivation and as i said get worse results.that said your commute isn't too bad but yeah your more likely to do badly if you commute and with law you need to be there really because of how often you'll need the library probably better to look at halls. Oxbridge insists on students living in halls for the above reasons precisely.
    I should mention though that it does work out for some people and this is just what I think i have never commuted so i would take that in to consideration

    This response was hilarious.

    You do worse because you have no friends :rofl:

    You do worse because your bus is late. :rofl:


    Back up your statement that commuters tend to do worse with statistics please.
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    (Original post by Tishy)
    No.... I don't think it's related.


    I commute and one of the good things about commuting is that once you get to uni, you're likely to want to stay there for the day. Say for example if you've got a lecture at 10, and then one at 2 or 3, you could spend the time in between going to the library and getting some work done. Whereas those who live 5 mins away are all too tempted to go home and have a sneaky nap.
    This is so true! I have so many friends who lived close to uni in first and second year and they would always nap in between lectures. They would often also skip the afternoon class because by the time they'd gone home and had a nap, they couldn't be bothered to come back. Hardly a recipe for success.
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    (Original post by Naveed-7)
    Commuting can have an affect on a person's performance in my opinion. I was doing a foundation degree 6 months ago. I'd leave my Uni at 5-6 pm, and I'd arrive at home at around 8 pm (with a large load of work to do overnight + tiredness), had to wake up the next day at around 5 am to go back to uni. However, I did make a few mistakes back then, and I do believe that with effort and a proper travel routine, the work can be done.
    The guy is only a 30 minute bus ride away. A lot of my friends who moved away from uni had a 40 minute away back to their flats. Please tell me how that is any different.
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    (Original post by Tishy)
    The guy is only a 30 minute bus ride away. A lot of my friends who moved away from uni had a 40 minute away back to their flats. Please tell me how that is any different.
    It isn't.
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    You'll do well on the basis of how you perform and how much effort you put in.

    A lot of people commute to my university. On my course, I have several people who have 40 min+ commutes. Some put more effort in and get 1sts, some don't put that much effort in and get 2:2s.

    (Original post by rayquaza17)
    I commute for 3 hours a day and I'm 7th out of 170 people on my course.
    I would not say that we tend to do worse lol.
    Off topic, but I've never understood how or why people rank out of their colleagues on courses?
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    The ones who I knew commuted all got Firsts in their degrees.

    I actually think commuting is better. When I finished my lectures (I lived on campus) all I wanted to do was to fall into bed or go to the pub as opposed to studying. Whereas commuting makes you make the most of the day and the resources at the university.
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    I commuted to college 90 minutes each way and I got AABC in my alevels, but I was always tired and didn't get out much during the week
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    (Original post by GoingToBurst)
    I have to say I completely disagree.

    Being late to lectures because of bad traffic only happens in extreme circumstances/when the person hasn't left enough time to actually get there and factor in any delays.
    I commute, my uni is a 20 minute drive away and I always leave an hour before I should be there, to factor in any delays that may occur. I do this with everything though, not just uni. Most adults factor in extra time for things they have to do so that they are on time. This isn't a new concept. Rolling out of bed 10 minutes before a lecture might be great to some people, but good luck becoming accustomed to the real world when you graduate and have to wake up in decent time.

    I have never found it difficult to socialise or make friends due to my living situation. I have a wider group of friends than my friends who stayed in halls because they tended to stick with their flatmates and not bother making relationships with anyone else. I, on the other hand, didn't have the forced friendships that come with halls and was then required to make relationships with as many people as I wanted to, if I wanted to make friends.

    My motivation to do work has never come from the amount of friends I have or where I live. My motivation to do work is that I want to learn and get a good degree. The amount of friends I have isn't a direct link to my happiness either. More friends doesn't mean you are happier. I am much happier with a small, close group of friends than I am when I'm trying to be friends with absolutely everyone at the same time.

    Commuting doesn't prevent anyone from going to the library either. Nor is the library the only place a student can study. Law students primarily use cases and statutes which are mostly available online - no need to be on campus for those. Course reading can be purchased or borrowed from the library - only requires you to be on campus at the time of borrowing and returning, which could be days that you'll be there anyway.


    OP: don't listen to anyone who tries to tell you that commuting will make you less likely to succeed, especially if that person has no experience in going to uni whilst commuting anyway!
    As I said this is only my experience I had only about 5 people on my course one guy took 4 years to complete what was a 2 year course one guy just plain stopped turning up it's just my experience another couple of local students in Portsmouth i never saw them apart from on the first day i'm not saying it's everyone it's just what I have seen.

    the whole friends thing have you seen how many people say "I've made no friends" and it turns out they lived at home I answered about 9 or 10 threads just like that last year.

    Exactly I didn't commute but i hope you can see why it think it might.
 
 
 

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