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    Hello, I am currently in my first year in sixth form studying biology and chemistry,

    I want to achieve the highest possible grade,

    so to the people who obtained an A/A* in AS or A2, could you give me some tips and advice?

    Please feel free to give useful websites/books and animations!
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    I'm in the same boat too, specifically edexcel board for science but i'm taking physics too
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    Bump!* I want answers as well!

    Posted from TSR Mobile
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    Yes. Tell me all the secrets.
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    :bump:
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    The key is just making sure you find an effective way to revise which you've probably been told thousands of times already. It took me nearly 2 years to realise what I was doing was ineffective and almost paid the consequences.

    Doing loads and loads of past papers will also help but can only take you so far. In order to get an A* you really need to challenge yourself and complete those 'stretch' questions or look for material beyond your syllabus which will undoubtedly help solidify your knowledge.

    Essentially, you really do need to love your subject in order to get 90% and above at A2.
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    I managed to get A*s in Chemistry and Physics with full ums in both (maths and f maths also).

    The key is to start your revision really early, ideally now and keep up constant hard work throughout the year, cramming close to exams just does not work for the top grades. You should do all the questions in the textbook straight after you learn a new topic, if you have any problems with anything ask your teacher for help, even if it sounds stupid. This means that you have an understanding of the subject before practising exam technique. Ask your teacher for more questions all the time. You should do as many past papers as possible, I went back to 1999 for mine, often they recycle questions. Take mock exams really seriously, you should get the grade in the mock that you want for real. Make sure you work in all your free periods.

    Hope this helps
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    These are tips for biology and chemistry.
    Biology
    Make notes, learn, do questions, use questions to rewrite notes so you're learning the correct stuff. (P.S. Do all the questions you can, to include anything possibly relevant, better the earlier, so you're learning the correct stuff the earliest. With application of knowledge, you don't need to necessarily learn it, unless you think you definitely won't all of get it in the exam.)

    After you've learnt something,make sure to revisit it; I mean it. I'll tell you this story from experience, I got an A at BIO1 past paper in January, so I presumed I'd remember it, so I revisited it really late. I never revisited it earlier, because I never realised I forgot so much stuff. Luckily short-term memory can be a blessing.

    Do past paper questions for biology; honestly, they cover everything the best.
    So write your final notes off the past papers, golden rule.
    Make sure you also confer with your teachers about what you need to know.

    Chemistry
    Luckily most things in chemistry complement each other.
    Some things, you'll learn, just take a while to fully comprehend.
    I'd say chemistry is far easier than biology in terms of workload.

    Ionisation energies, they require some time to fully comprehend, like when you learn later about a thing called electronegativities (don't be daunted, very easy) you solidify your understanding of ionisation energies more. You get a better understanding for how the size of the atom relates, for example.
    With mass spectrometry, I'd say to just see a mark scheme answer on it, as although it's long, it's very logical, but this includes all the info needed. (I might upload my own notes for you.)

    Chemical calculations can be summarised up into about 5 calculations, very basic algebra is needed here.
    Do you know how to use triangles for equations with 3 variables?

    So imagine the equation n = m/M
    Name:  mole equals mass over molar mass triangle.png
Views: 461
Size:  2.6 KB

    Now, this triangle can work for so many equations (all equations with only 3 variables.)
    To work out n, simply cover n then look at it; it's m/M,
    for m, it's n x M,
    for M, it's m/n.

    Only one thing can ever go at the top, so if you know the equation (any with 3 variables), you can instantly configure the triangle.
    Sorry if this stuff seems very basic to you, but many people can have trouble with it.

    Onto another equation, n=c x v, where would these go?
    .
    Spoiler:
    Show
    n at top, c and v at bottom, either side.
    Hess's law, now this confused me greatly at first (perhaps I wasn't paying enough attention, I don't know). Once you get it fully, you get it, but getting there... I just didn't get it when a teacher was explaining it to me (though I don't think it was the teacher's fault; sometimes it just happens.) I saw other things online explaining it to me, but when I saw a specific one, it was like the person who made it thought exactly like me, and I got it instantly.

    Need to do some questions to make sure you get into the habit of not doing silly mistakes, if that makes any sense.

    I'll upload my own notes for this, probably. My outline for this was amazing.

    Hydrogen spectrum, easy, logical theory (nice because chemistry is all a, then b, then c, well it feels like it anyway.) Mark scheme should be fine here.

    CH2

    Organic chemistry, mechanisms, it's like it's easier to fully memorise the drawn equation before you can fully understand it in your own head, also without looking at your notes. I found I only fully understood it, after I fully memorised the equation(s).

    If you know the rules about electronegativities (technically, the electrons will go to the more electronegative elements, the more electronegative element is the element closer to fluorine), it's very logical, and very easy later on.

    So if a carbon - oxygen bond was going to split, where would the two electrons (constituting the covalent bond) go to? which element? (If the most electronegative is closer to fluorine.)
    Spoiler:
    Show
    oxygen
    Periodicities (periodic trends) just memorise, gets easier later on (there is logic though.) Loads of nick-knacks here though, unfortunately.

    When it goes onto the shapes of molecules, fortunately for me, I was privvy to some really good resources, which you would probably be unable to get to, considering my college paid a lot to get to them. :/ Quote me when you get to this part (towards the end of the year) and I give you some immensely helpful tips. It'd kinda be too wordy at the moment, if you have no idea what I'm talking about. (It'd be too wordy for this post, already long, regardless.)

    Some other minor topics you should be fine with.

    With chemistry, on a last note, you can literally just work with past papers to do practically all your revision (especially in CH1.)(In CH2, you'll still need to memorise specific parts, but it ain't that bad. You quickly get what is wanted for you.)


    Biology will take longer than chemistry; far more to memorise. Key here is mark scheme, to remember the right things. Although this is said a lot, seriously, it's just better to start working earlier, to put less stress on you later (and I mean a lot less stress.) I'm not saying it's impossible to get good grades if you don't start it early, it'd just make you one unhappy bunny.

    I'd say again, if you need help with anything specific, message/reply to me; I can help, having done an AS in both, and know the tricks or easy ways to remember things.
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    About the triangles for equations, you should do this in your head later, just imagine the triangle with the variables input.
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    Spoiler:
    Show
    Above

    (Original post by Jkoo22)
    I'm in the same boat too, specifically edexcel board for science but i'm taking physics too
    (Original post by skylightflower)
    Hello, I am currently in my first year in sixth form studying biology and chemistry,

    I want to achieve the highest possible grade,

    so to the people who obtained an A/A* in AS or A2, could you give me some tips and advice?

    Please feel free to give useful websites/books and animations!
    (Original post by AnimeFreak101)
    Bump!* I want answers as well!

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    (Original post by Ser Alex Toyne)
    Yes. Tell me all the secrets.
    (Original post by hopefulmedic1998)
    :bump:
    • Thread Starter
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    (Original post by XcitingStuart)
    These are tips for biology and chemistry.
    Biology
    Make notes, learn, do questions, use questions to rewrite notes so you're learning the correct stuff. (P.S. Do all the questions you can, to include anything possibly relevant, better the earlier, so you're learning the correct stuff the earliest. With application of knowledge, you don't need to necessarily learn it, unless you think you definitely won't all of get it in the exam.)

    After you've learnt something,make sure to revisit it; I mean it. I'll tell you this story from experience, I got an A at BIO1 past paper in January, so I presumed I'd remember it, so I revisited it really late. I never revisited it earlier, because I never realised I forgot so much stuff. Luckily short-term memory can be a blessing.

    Do past paper questions for biology; honestly, they cover everything the best.
    So write your final notes off the past papers, golden rule.
    Make sure you also confer with your teachers about what you need to know.

    Chemistry
    Luckily most things in chemistry complement each other.
    Some things, you'll learn, just take a while to fully comprehend.
    I'd say chemistry is far easier than biology in terms of workload.

    Ionisation energies, they require some time to fully comprehend, like when you learn later about a thing called electronegativities (don't be daunted, very easy) you solidify your understanding of ionisation energies more. You get a better understanding for how the size of the atom relates, for example.
    With mass spectrometry, I'd say to just see a mark scheme answer on it, as although it's long, it's very logical, but this includes all the info needed. (I might upload my own notes for you.)

    Chemical calculations can be summarised up into about 5 calculations, very basic algebra is needed here.
    Do you know how to use triangles for equations with 3 variables?

    So imagine the equation n = m/M
    Name:  mole equals mass over molar mass triangle.png
Views: 461
Size:  2.6 KB

    Now, this triangle can work for so many equations (all equations with only 3 variables.)
    To work out n, simply cover n then look at it; it's m/M,
    for m, it's n x M,
    for M, it's m/n.

    Only one thing can ever go at the top, so if you know the equation (any with 3 variables), you can instantly configure the triangle.
    Sorry if this stuff seems very basic to you, but many people can have trouble with it.

    Onto another equation, n=c x v, where would these go?
    .
    Spoiler:
    Show
    n at top, c and v at bottom, either side.
    Hess's law, now this confused me greatly at first (perhaps I wasn't paying enough attention, I don't know). Once you get it fully, you get it, but getting there... I just didn't get it when a teacher was explaining it to me (though I don't think it was the teacher's fault; sometimes it just happens.) I saw other things online explaining it to me, but when I saw a specific one, it was like the person who made it thought exactly like me, and I got it instantly.

    Need to do some questions to make sure you get into the habit of not doing silly mistakes, if that makes any sense.

    I'll upload my own notes for this, probably. My outline for this was amazing.

    Hydrogen spectrum, easy, logical theory (nice because chemistry is all a, then b, then c, well it feels like it anyway.) Mark scheme should be fine here.

    CH2

    Organic chemistry, mechanisms, it's like it's easier to fully memorise the drawn equation before you can fully understand it in your own head, also without looking at your notes. I found I only fully understood it, after I fully memorised the equation(s).

    If you know the rules about electronegativities (technically, the electrons will go to the more electronegative elements, the more electronegative element is the element closer to fluorine), it's very logical, and very easy later on.

    So if a carbon - oxygen bond was going to split, where would the two electrons (constituting the covalent bond) go to? which element? (If the most electronegative is closer to fluorine.)
    Spoiler:
    Show
    oxygen
    Periodicities (periodic trends) just memorise, gets easier later on (there is logic though.) Loads of nick-knacks here though, unfortunately.

    When it goes onto the shapes of molecules, fortunately for me, I was privvy to some really good resources, which you would probably be unable to get to, considering my college paid a lot to get to them. :/ Quote me when you get to this part (towards the end of the year) and I give you some immensely helpful tips. It'd kinda be too wordy at the moment, if you have no idea what I'm talking about. (It'd be too wordy for this post, already long, regardless.)

    Some other minor topics you should be fine with.

    With chemistry, on a last note, you can literally just work with past papers to do practically all your revision (especially in CH1.)(In CH2, you'll still need to memorise specific parts, but it ain't that bad. You quickly get what is wanted for you.)


    Biology will take longer than chemistry; far more to memorise. Key here is mark scheme, to remember the right things. Although this is said a lot, seriously, it's just better to start working earlier, to put less stress on you later (and I mean a lot less stress.) I'm not saying it's impossible to get good grades if you don't start it early, it'd just make you one unhappy bunny.

    I'd say again, if you need help with anything specific, message/reply to me; I can help, having done an AS in both, and know the tricks or easy ways to remember things.

    hello! Thank you veryvery very very much for this advice, words cannot contemplate how good this advice is! I will take into every SINGLE detail that you've given, because I definitely need it!

    I am not the cleverest person, I am the kind who has to work very hard to get good grades, but boy am i willing to work hard!
    • Thread Starter
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    (Original post by XcitingStuart)
    These are tips for biology and chemistry.
    Biology
    Make notes, learn, do questions, use questions to rewrite notes so you're learning the correct stuff. (P.S. Do all the questions you can, to include anything possibly relevant, better the earlier, so you're learning the correct stuff the earliest. With application of knowledge, you don't need to necessarily learn it, unless you think you definitely won't all of get it in the exam.)

    After you've learnt something,make sure to revisit it; I mean it. I'll tell you this story from experience, I got an A at BIO1 past paper in January, so I presumed I'd remember it, so I revisited it really late. I never revisited it earlier, because I never realised I forgot so much stuff. Luckily short-term memory can be a blessing.

    Do past paper questions for biology; honestly, they cover everything the best.
    So write your final notes off the past papers, golden rule.
    Make sure you also confer with your teachers about what you need to know.

    Chemistry
    Luckily most things in chemistry complement each other.
    Some things, you'll learn, just take a while to fully comprehend.
    I'd say chemistry is far easier than biology in terms of workload.

    Ionisation energies, they require some time to fully comprehend, like when you learn later about a thing called electronegativities (don't be daunted, very easy) you solidify your understanding of ionisation energies more. You get a better understanding for how the size of the atom relates, for example.
    With mass spectrometry, I'd say to just see a mark scheme answer on it, as although it's long, it's very logical, but this includes all the info needed. (I might upload my own notes for you.)

    Chemical calculations can be summarised up into about 5 calculations, very basic algebra is needed here.
    Do you know how to use triangles for equations with 3 variables?

    So imagine the equation n = m/M
    Name:  mole equals mass over molar mass triangle.png
Views: 461
Size:  2.6 KB

    Now, this triangle can work for so many equations (all equations with only 3 variables.)
    To work out n, simply cover n then look at it; it's m/M,
    for m, it's n x M,
    for M, it's m/n.

    Only one thing can ever go at the top, so if you know the equation (any with 3 variables), you can instantly configure the triangle.
    Sorry if this stuff seems very basic to you, but many people can have trouble with it.

    Onto another equation, n=c x v, where would these go?
    .
    Spoiler:
    Show
    n at top, c and v at bottom, either side.
    Hess's law, now this confused me greatly at first (perhaps I wasn't paying enough attention, I don't know). Once you get it fully, you get it, but getting there... I just didn't get it when a teacher was explaining it to me (though I don't think it was the teacher's fault; sometimes it just happens.) I saw other things online explaining it to me, but when I saw a specific one, it was like the person who made it thought exactly like me, and I got it instantly.

    Need to do some questions to make sure you get into the habit of not doing silly mistakes, if that makes any sense.

    I'll upload my own notes for this, probably. My outline for this was amazing.

    Hydrogen spectrum, easy, logical theory (nice because chemistry is all a, then b, then c, well it feels like it anyway.) Mark scheme should be fine here.

    CH2

    Organic chemistry, mechanisms, it's like it's easier to fully memorise the drawn equation before you can fully understand it in your own head, also without looking at your notes. I found I only fully understood it, after I fully memorised the equation(s).

    If you know the rules about electronegativities (technically, the electrons will go to the more electronegative elements, the more electronegative element is the element closer to fluorine), it's very logical, and very easy later on.

    So if a carbon - oxygen bond was going to split, where would the two electrons (constituting the covalent bond) go to? which element? (If the most electronegative is closer to fluorine.)
    Spoiler:
    Show
    oxygen
    Periodicities (periodic trends) just memorise, gets easier later on (there is logic though.) Loads of nick-knacks here though, unfortunately.

    When it goes onto the shapes of molecules, fortunately for me, I was privvy to some really good resources, which you would probably be unable to get to, considering my college paid a lot to get to them. :/ Quote me when you get to this part (towards the end of the year) and I give you some immensely helpful tips. It'd kinda be too wordy at the moment, if you have no idea what I'm talking about. (It'd be too wordy for this post, already long, regardless.)

    Some other minor topics you should be fine with.

    With chemistry, on a last note, you can literally just work with past papers to do practically all your revision (especially in CH1.)(In CH2, you'll still need to memorise specific parts, but it ain't that bad. You quickly get what is wanted for you.)


    Biology will take longer than chemistry; far more to memorise. Key here is mark scheme, to remember the right things. Although this is said a lot, seriously, it's just better to start working earlier, to put less stress on you later (and I mean a lot less stress.) I'm not saying it's impossible to get good grades if you don't start it early, it'd just make you one unhappy bunny.

    I'd say again, if you need help with anything specific, message/reply to me; I can help, having done an AS in both, and know the tricks or easy ways to remember things.
    i send you a PM
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    (Original post by skylightflower)
    Hello, I am currently in my first year in sixth form studying biology and chemistry,

    I want to achieve the highest possible grade,

    so to the people who obtained an A/A* in AS or A2, could you give me some tips and advice?

    Please feel free to give useful websites/books and animations!
    As somemone who has achieved an A* and 98.3333333% in Physics i can advise you the following.
    1,Dont stick on the textbook, use the internet ,go to the library and research more about the topic you are studying. This will not only allow you to score higher but it will also develop your interest for the subject which intern will boost your score up.
    2, Think on your own. Try to apply what youve learnt. For example the day i learnt centripetal force i was daydreaming about how to invent a machine to find the co efficient of friction(umg=mv^2/r).So daydream about the subject. Keep thinking about it and during the exam you will find each question interesting.

    All the BEST!!!
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    Practice papers. Millions of them.
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    Here are the steps to get an A*:

    1.memorise textbook
    2. Do all past papers at-least twice
    3. Collect A* on results day
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    (Original post by jingham)
    I managed to get A*s in Chemistry and Physics with full ums in both (maths and f maths also).

    The key is to start your revision really early, ideally now and keep up constant hard work throughout the year, cramming close to exams just does not work for the top grades. You should do all the questions in the textbook straight after you learn a new topic, if you have any problems with anything ask your teacher for help, even if it sounds stupid. This means that you have an understanding of the subject before practising exam technique. Ask your teacher for more questions all the time. You should do as many past papers as possible, I went back to 1999 for mine, often they recycle questions. Take mock exams really seriously, you should get the grade in the mock that you want for real. Make sure you work in all your free periods.

    Hope this helps
    hi thanks! That really helps!

    I was wondering, where did you find your old papers? my exam board is OCR btw, and i was wondering if you knew any good website
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    Revision. Not just a few days before the exam, or a few weeks. But from Day 1, you should be revising the topic you just learnt in class and make sure you understand it. If you don't, ALWAYS ask your teacher for help. If you still don't, read your revision guide. Watch Youtube videos of people that teach science, like short and informative videos that are fun to watch are memorable. And of course, past papers prepares you best for the real test.
 
 
 

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