Turn on thread page Beta

Not sure whether to do history or philosophy at uni watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    ....
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    History and Philosophy aren't well known for their job prospects. Unless you want to work somewhere not relevant to your degree (e.g. finance)
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Depends entirely what you wish to do with them in the future, as the above poster has said they don't have wonderful job prospects centred around the subjects itself, but it's entirely down to where you wish to go with them.

    Though if you do pick Philosophy I would probably say do a joint honours course, as it will be very difficult just to get a job with a philosophy degree.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Inexorably)
    Depends entirely what you wish to do with them in the future, as the above poster has said they don't have wonderful job prospects centred around the subjects itself, but it's entirely down to where you wish to go with them.

    Though if you do pick Philosophy I would probably say do a joint honours course, as it will be very difficult just to get a job with a philosophy degree.
    Yeah, I honestly have no idea, I'm mostly just picking a degree that I'll enjoy, because I don't know what else to do.

    Would history and philosophy joint honours be alright, or would that just weaken my position even further?
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by benjenstark)
    Yeah, I honestly have no idea, I'm mostly just picking a degree that I'll enjoy, because I don't know what else to do.

    Would history and philosophy joint honours be alright, or would that just weaken my position even further?
    I think it would put you in a slightly better position as there are obviously some jobs centred around history (more than philosophy), but ultimately all I can say is to think long and hard about where you want to go in the future cause there's very little going back
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Inexorably)
    I think it would put you in a slightly better position as there are obviously some jobs centred around history (more than philosophy), but ultimately all I can say is to think long and hard about where you want to go in the future cause there's very little going back
    *sweats nervously*

    Damn, I wish I had a career in mind like my friends. I have nothing

    I might ask my tutor on Monday what she thinks.
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by benjenstark)
    *sweats nervously*

    Damn, I wish I had a career in mind like my friends. I have nothing

    I might ask my tutor on Monday what she thinks.

    Hey I'm in a similar position. I feel like such an idiot when anybody asks me what I want to do.

    I'm thinking of doing a joint honors as I feel it my provide more scope and leave my options a little more open. Like 60% of graduate jobs don't require a specific degree so I'm probably going to do something I have a bit of interest in and pray something comes along.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by DoNotResuscitate)
    Hey I'm in a similar position. I feel like such an idiot when anybody asks me what I want to do.

    I'm thinking of doing a joint honors as I feel it my provide more scope and leave my options a little more open. Like 60% of graduate jobs don't require a specific degree so I'm probably going to do something I have a bit of interest in and pray something comes along.
    I'm both glad and sad we're in the same position - it sucks, but we're not alone!

    What are you considering for your joint honours?
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    A joint honours degree would be good for you I think. It would open your options in terms of employability and expansion of knowledge. A family member of mine in a relatively high job told me employers look for variety in a candidate, so doing a joint honours would be a good way to make you a credible and interesting candidate in the future.

    Like you said, you don't know what career you want, but as you go on with your degree there will be opportunities for discovering your passions
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by benjenstark)
    I have a dilemma.

    I was fixated on doing history for ages, mostly because I thought I would playing to my strengths; though of course I do enjoy it. At the start, I didn't really do a lot of research into other courses, but now I'm considering philosophy.

    My reasoning for philosophy are as follows: lower grade requirements for my chosen uni, AAB-ABB instead of AAA-AAB; higher student satisfaction; more students in professional jobs after 6 months. I've already read some philosophy: Nietzsche, Camus, Wittgenstein. Would I choose to read history over philosophy? I don't know. It's very confusing.

    Biology, history, and philosophy are probably my favourite subjects, but when it comes to choosing a degree, i have no idea. I think bio is more or less out of the question, as I got an E in chemistry at AS, and haven't continued it on to A2 (I now do Eng Lit, history, and biology). I also have no relevant work experience. So, out of history and philosophy, which to do?

    I'm not expecting anyone to be able to tell me, but I am wondering if anyone could shed some insight on either/or.
    Neither History nor Philosophy has as good job prospects as some other degree subjects, as you probably know, and others have doubtless pointed out.

    History is seen as being the more serious of the two though, and from those I personally know who have studied History, they've gone on to much better things (one is training to be a social worker on the Frontline graduate scheme, the other is doing her Masters at LSE) than the one person I know who did Philosophy, and now works in a gym. This is also a reflection of the amount of extra curricular activities they did though.

    Basically I'd say ultimately go for the one you enjoy, but if you are studying an arts, essay based subject like one of these, you really have to make sure you do things outside of your studies - get on the committee of a society, do some volunteering, part time work, whatever you enjoy, then you will graduate with prospects
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Do not got to Uni to study Humanities!
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by DoNotResuscitate)
    ....
    (Original post by benjenstark)
    ...
    Guys - don't let anyone pressure you into choosing a career path before you're ready! Work hard at things you enjoy and see where it takes you
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by benjenstark)
    I have a dilemma.

    I was fixated on doing history for ages, mostly because I thought I would playing to my strengths; though of course I do enjoy it. At the start, I didn't really do a lot of research into other courses, but now I'm considering philosophy.

    My reasoning for philosophy are as follows: lower grade requirements for my chosen uni, AAB-ABB instead of AAA-AAB; higher student satisfaction; more students in professional jobs after 6 months. I've already read some philosophy: Nietzsche, Camus, Wittgenstein. Would I choose to read history over philosophy? I don't know. It's very confusing.

    Biology, history, and philosophy are probably my favourite subjects, but when it comes to choosing a degree, i have no idea. I think bio is more or less out of the question, as I got an E in chemistry at AS, and haven't continued it on to A2 (I now do Eng Lit, history, and biology). I also have no relevant work experience. So, out of history and philosophy, which to do?

    I'm not expecting anyone to be able to tell me, but I am wondering if anyone could shed some insight on either/or.
    I have never applied for History (although I did study it at A-Level) so can't really comment there, but I know a fair bit about applying for Philosophy at University.

    The one thing you should consider very carefully before you apply is whether your interest is in "analytic" philosophy. UK courses (generally, but there are only very specific exceptions) cater very closely to the area of "analytic" philosophy.

    Probably you have some understanding (perhaps a great deal, I hope I'm not patronising!) of the analytic/continental distinction. You say you've read Wittgenstein who is generally considered a canonical Analytical philosopher, but Camus and Neitszche are certainly considered continental, so you have at least experienced it if you are not explicitly conscious of it. The latter is the kind of Philosophy that, on most UK courses, you absolutely would not touch. You are very unlikely to come into contact with questions about the origin of morality, or whether suicide is the only adequate response to life, or anything of that nature, in a British philosophy course. You are far more likely to be answering questions about things like the word 'the', or whether names of things can ever truly be attached to specific objects.

    Maybe the latter is for you (I thought it was for me for a very long time), but a very large number of people (as I understand it) are shocked when they arrive to study Philosophy in Western countries, and find that it is rather more 'technical', to use a very inadequate term, than they really expected, and less firmly routed in the humanities and social sciences. Basically, if you want or expect to read French Philosophers like Camus, Derrida, Searle, Mzerleau-Ponty et al during University, look into the course content at your chosen course in very much depth before you choose Philosophy. You do not want to be surprised.

    I hope that was some help
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    You can study both subjects in your own time at much less expense. Uni ranking doesn't matter you can get on to a biological sciences course without chemistry at lower ranked unis.
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by benjenstark)
    I'm both glad and sad we're in the same position - it sucks, but we're not alone!

    What are you considering for your joint honours?
    Well I was considering philosophy, politics and economics but that depends upon grades really. I'm also interested in english literature and history so I'm kinda hunting around for degrees that involve any of these.

    I'm also friends with a ton of science geeks which gets me down as I feel they have better career prospects :/
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by tomfailinghelp)
    I have never applied for History (although I did study it at A-Level) so can't really comment there, but I know a fair bit about applying for Philosophy at University.

    The one thing you should consider very carefully before you apply is whether your interest is in "analytic" philosophy. UK courses (generally, but there are only very specific exceptions) cater very closely to the area of "analytic" philosophy.

    Probably you have some understanding (perhaps a great deal, I hope I'm not patronising!) of the analytic/continental distinction. You say you've read Wittgenstein who is generally considered a canonical Analytical philosopher, but Camus and Neitszche are certainly considered continental, so you have at least experienced it if you are not explicitly conscious of it. The latter is the kind of Philosophy that, on most UK courses, you absolutely would not touch. You are very unlikely to come into contact with questions about the origin of morality, or whether suicide is the only adequate response to life, or anything of that nature, in a British philosophy course. You are far more likely to be answering questions about things like the word 'the', or whether names of things can ever truly be attached to specific objects.

    Maybe the latter is for you (I thought it was for me for a very long time), but a very large number of people (as I understand it) are shocked when they arrive to study Philosophy in Western countries, and find that it is rather more 'technical', to use a very inadequate term, than they really expected, and less firmly routed in the humanities and social sciences. Basically, if you want or expect to read French Philosophers like Camus, Derrida, Searle, Mzerleau-Ponty et al during University, look into the course content at your chosen course in very much depth before you choose Philosophy. You do not want to be surprised.

    I hope that was some help
    My first choice uni has some pretty decent sounding modules: 'existentialism and the self', 'ethics and the modern world' , 'legitimacy and reason.' However, it certainly does sound a lot more analytical than not, so, I suppose I'll have to do a lot more research before I choose seemingly on a whim. You have helped, thank you!

    (Original post by DoNotResuscitate)
    Well I was considering philosophy, politics and economics but that depends upon grades really. I'm also interested in english literature and history so I'm kinda hunting around for degrees that involve any of these.

    I'm also friends with a ton of science geeks which gets me down as I feel they have better career prospects :/
    I really like science, but I didn't choose my options carefully enough as I had no idea what I wanted to do, so now I'm kind of stuck. It sucks.

    And, yeah, it seems like a lot of people hold the view that there's no point in going to uni unless it's a STEM subject, which is kind of depressing...
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by benjenstark)
    My first choice uni has some pretty decent sounding modules: 'existentialism and the self', 'ethics and the modern world' , 'legitimacy and reason.' However, it certainly does sound a lot more analytical than not, so, I suppose I'll have to do a lot more research before I choose seemingly on a whim. You have helped, thank you!
    Oh well then, that certainly is significant It is worth being conscious of, though, that the courses tend to be analytically based. I have heard that people dropping out is quite common for that reason (that's only anecdotal though).
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    There is the option of not going to uni at all and getting a job after A levels. Most arts/humanity degrees suck at getting jobs anyway and you probably end up in a job after graduation in a job that does not need a degree considering over half of graduates are in non graduate jobs. The half that do have graduate jobs include those that did vocational and semi vocational degrees like nursing and engineering.

    If you are really unsure about which degree to do, get a job and do one when you are sure rather than getting into debt that will last most of your adult life on something you may regret.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by benjenstark)
    I have a dilemma.

    I was fixated on doing history for ages, mostly because I thought I would playing to my strengths; though of course I do enjoy it. At the start, I didn't really do a lot of research into other courses, but now I'm considering philosophy.

    My reasoning for philosophy are as follows: lower grade requirements for my chosen uni, AAB-ABB instead of AAA-AAB; higher student satisfaction; more students in professional jobs after 6 months. I've already read some philosophy: Nietzsche, Camus, Wittgenstein. Would I choose to read history over philosophy? I don't know. It's very confusing.

    Biology, history, and philosophy are probably my favourite subjects, but when it comes to choosing a degree, i have no idea. I think bio is more or less out of the question, as I got an E in chemistry at AS, and haven't continued it on to A2 (I now do Eng Lit, history, and biology). I also have no relevant work experience. So, out of history and philosophy, which to do?

    I'm not expecting anyone to be able to tell me, but I am wondering if anyone could shed some insight on either/or.
    Consider a course which encompasses both subjects. Maybe some history courses have philosophy modules, or maybe you could do a joint course in history with philosophy.

    Most importantly, do what you think you will enjoy! Especially if you don't know what career you want out of it.
    Online

    20
    ReputationRep:
    somethingbeautiful, your super powers are needed.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: September 16, 2015
Poll
Is the Big Bang theory correct?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.