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    When did it become acceptable to spell things with a 'z' when you should be using an 's'?
    This is half spelling-Nazi motivated and half serious question; is it now common practice to spell things like 'trivialise' or 'specialize' like that? When did this become OK? Has it always been OK and I'm just being a complete speng?
    Is that how you spell things in your personal statements, in exams or on your C.V? Have your teachers and lecturers taught you this way or what?

    http://www.tysto.com/uk-us-spelling-list.html
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    It's the American spelling for most of the words. As we more widely consume American media, certain words and phrases and yes, spellings too, fall into our vocabularies.
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    (Original post by TheThiefOfBagdad)
    When did it become acceptable to spell things with a 'z' when you should be using an 's'?
    This is half spelling-Nazi motivated and half serious question; is it now common practice to spell things like 'trivialise' or 'specialize' like that? When did this become OK? Has it always been OK and I'm just being a complete speng?
    Is that how you spell things in your personal statements, in exams or on your C.V? Have your teachers and lecturers taught you this way or what?

    http://www.tysto.com/uk-us-spelling-list.html
    Probably some time in the 19th century when the OUP adopted Oxford spelling.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxford_spelling
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    I refuse to spell most of those words the american way, they just look weird with a "z"..
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    (Original post by Choo Choo Train)
    I refuse to spell most of those words the american way, they just look weird with a "z"..
    Why don't you spell them the Oxford way instead
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    (Original post by Mactotaur)
    It's the American spelling for most of the words. As we more widely consume American media, certain words and phrases and yes, spellings too, fall into our vocabularies.
    Of this I am well aware, but on the serious side of my question, is it now acceptable to use the American spelling for words on official documents/in exams etc.? If you did that when I was in school you'd get laughed at and have to do it again, correctly.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    Probably some time in the 19th century when the OUP adopted Oxford spelling.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxford_spelling
    Well I never! This is fascinating!

    My question still stands though. (general) Standards have changed in the past decade or so. This is the only forum I've been on where I see the -ize suffix in widespread use by British people.
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    (Original post by TheThiefOfBagdad)
    Of this I am well aware, but on the serious side of my question, is it now acceptable to use the American spelling for words on official documents/in exams etc.? If you did that when I was in school you'd get laughed at and have to do it again, correctly.
    In exams, spelling largely doesn't count for much (except in English, and I have no idea of the marking criteria there).
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    Maybe we should turn our attention to world hunger?
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    Stupid mindless zombies (or " teenagers" as they're often called) copying everything the Americans say and do.
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    (Original post by TheThiefOfBagdad)
    Well I never! This is fascinating!

    My question still stands though. (general) Standards have changed in the past decade or so. This is the only forum I've been on where I see the -ize suffix in widespread use by British people.
    I suspect the use of "ize" has increase due to spellcheckers not being set to British English which generally prefer "ise"

    This is what Fowler has to say on the subject


    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Fowlers-Mode...der_0198610211

    page 422
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    Same as wannabe "prom goers" who use the "semester" instead of "term"
    They tend to have watched high school musical too. Often

    The yanks use semesters, incorrectly as it happens, as a semester is 6 months, not 10 weeks
    Technically, if you want to, use trimester.

    IMHO item shows laziness not to use UK spellings
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    (Original post by domonict)
    Same as wannabe "prom goers" who use the "semester" instead of "term"
    They tend to have watched high school musical too. Often

    The yanks use semesters, incorrectly as it happens, as a semester is 6 months, not 10 weeks
    Technically, if you want to, use trimester.

    IMHO item shows laziness not to use UK spellings
    A lot of universities (Stirling may have started this in the 1980s) organise their teaching into semesters albeit that student residence is divided differently.


    http://www.manchester.ac.uk/discover/key-dates/
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    As long as you spell things the same way consistently throughout a document it doesn't matter.
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    (Original post by TheThiefOfBagdad)
    When did it become acceptable to spell things with a 'z' when you should be using an 's'?
    This is half spelling-Nazi motivated and half serious question; is it now common practice to spell things like 'trivialise' or 'specialize' like that? When did this become OK? Has it always been OK and I'm just being a complete speng?
    Is that how you spell things in your personal statements, in exams or on your C.V? Have your teachers and lecturers taught you this way or what?

    http://www.tysto.com/uk-us-spelling-list.html
    It became acceptable when America took over the world
 
 
 
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