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The "Corbyn generation": who will they vote for in 10 years time? watch

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    As with a lot of left-wingers, Corbyn has attracted the young, educated generation who are disillusioned about their personal circumstances: renting in substandard accommodation, struggling to find graduate jobs, their careers/lifestyles to date not matching the expectations they had when they were growing up.

    This is nothing new, Tony Benn had this sort of generation of followers back in the 1980s. What usually happens to this type is they shift towards the centre/centre right when they become property owners, have a reasonably good income, own two family cars and start to want to prioritise stability and low taxes, social change takes a back seat and they will sigh at the next generation's left-wing activism and say you'll wise up as you get older, we worked hard to get what we had, it's time you do the same rather than just protesting against stuff.

    But what's going to happen if things don't change in terms of the housing situation, if there isn't proper investment in housing stock?

    This Corbyn generation of disillusioned renters in their early to mid 20s will be a generation of even more disillusioned renters in their early to mid 30s. If they are still living in houseshares, still scrapping around doing unpaid internships and temporary work while they try and get established in their careers, they are not going to have had the conversion towards Conservatism that their parents had. They are going to be even more angry, especially with the Conservatives who will have been in power for fifteen years by then.

    Then there will no doubt be another generation of idealistic students coming up behind them wanting to also vote for the left-wing politics of protest.

    The problems with the housing market today mean that young peoples' access to housing is largely dependent on inheritance and parental help: so the children of wealthier parents will do OK, but with social mobility increasingly diminishing especially in terms of access to the best paid jobs you are going to get an increasing divide in society. More and more wealth will be concentrated in a smaller group and more and more people will start being left behind.

    This is where democracy and demographics will creep steadily leftwards unless the right can provide solutions. They have to be solutions that actually get today's less well off in to a situation where their circumstances improve. Otherwise the "loony left" politics of today will become much more part of the mainstream in ten to twenty years.

    Social attitudes generally drift leftwards over time anyway. Some of the themes of the loony left in the 1980s were gay marriage, pollution charges, bringing Sinn Fein in to the peace process, minimum wage legislation, withdrawal from the EEC - all of these things were seen as hopelessly out of touch with the Britain of the 1980s but over time this came in to the mainstream, all of those are now well accepted within the Conservative party.
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    It's rare for well off people to remain left wing. It's usually a phase they go through in their teens and early 20s. They grow out of it when they get older, but often continue the facade.
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    (Original post by MagicNMedicine)
    As with a lot of left-wingers, Corbyn has attracted the young, educated generation who are disillusioned about their personal circumstances: renting in substandard accommodation, struggling to find graduate jobs, their careers/lifestyles to date not matching the expectations they had when they were growing up.

    This is nothing new, Tony Benn had this sort of generation of followers back in the 1980s. What usually happens to this type is they shift towards the centre/centre right when they become property owners, have a reasonably good income, own two family cars and start to want to prioritise stability and low taxes, social change takes a back seat and they will sigh at the next generation's left-wing activism and say you'll wise up as you get older, we worked hard to get what we had, it's time you do the same rather than just protesting against stuff.

    But what's going to happen if things don't change in terms of the housing situation, if there isn't proper investment in housing stock?

    This Corbyn generation of disillusioned renters in their early to mid 20s will be a generation of even more disillusioned renters in their early to mid 30s. If they are still living in houseshares, still scrapping around doing unpaid internships and temporary work while they try and get established in their careers, they are not going to have had the conversion towards Conservatism that their parents had. They are going to be even more angry, especially with the Conservatives who will have been in power for fifteen years by then.

    Then there will no doubt be another generation of idealistic students coming up behind them wanting to also vote for the left-wing politics of protest.

    The problems with the housing market today mean that young peoples' access to housing is largely dependent on inheritance and parental help: so the children of wealthier parents will do OK, but with social mobility increasingly diminishing especially in terms of access to the best paid jobs you are going to get an increasing divide in society. More and more wealth will be concentrated in a smaller group and more and more people will start being left behind.

    This is where democracy and demographics will creep steadily leftwards unless the right can provide solutions. They have to be solutions that actually get today's less well off in to a situation where their circumstances improve. Otherwise the "loony left" politics of today will become much more part of the mainstream in ten to twenty years.

    Social attitudes generally drift leftwards over time anyway. Some of the themes of the loony left in the 1980s were gay marriage, pollution charges, bringing Sinn Fein in to the peace process, minimum wage legislation, withdrawal from the EEC - all of these things were seen as hopelessly out of touch with the Britain of the 1980s but over time this came in to the mainstream, all of those are now well accepted within the Conservative party.
    I think you are wrong about the demographics.

    As lifespan increases the proportion of the population who are young is dropping.

    Immigrant attitudes matter as well. The first generation of immigrants from the 1950-1970s joined heavily unionised industrial workplaces and most anti-immigrant rhetoric came from Conservative politicians. Their allegiance to Labour was fixed and unbending. It isn't quite as simple now. 1 million ethnic minority voters voted Tory at the last election; 1.6 million Labour. The rest were also rans. The threat of Brexit is increasing the number of EU nationals taking British citizenship. Not sure how well hard left socialism plays to a Polish plumber.
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    (Original post by ElephantMemory)
    It's rare for well off people to remain left wing. It's usually a phase they go through in their teens and early 20s. They grow out of it when they get older, but often continue the facade.
    Yeh I had that phase briefly for less than a year in 2009, I have been a proud right winger since. We are unwise when we are young, luckily I grew out of it quickly.
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    (Original post by Gears265)
    Yeh I had that phase briefly for less than a year in 2009, I have been a proud right winger since. We are unwise when we are young, luckily I grew out of it quickly.
    Lucky indeed. Only unwise idiots want to help the vulnerable. We should all just agree to let them idiots rot in their council houses.
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    (Original post by ElephantMemory)
    Lucky indeed. Only unwise idiots want to help the vulnerable. We should all just agree to let them idiots rot in their council houses.
    I never said don't help them but in regards to council housing since the tax payer is footing the bill they have no right to dictate to their guardians as may he how much quality they get. Until they give in the system can they demand some of it back.
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    (Original post by Gears265)
    I never said don't help them but in regards to council housing since the tax payer is footing the bill they have no right to dictate to their guardians as may he how much quality they get. Until they give in the system can they demand some of it back.
    You have a flawed view of underclass people. Claiming benefits, living in social housing and getting by on the absolute minimum is not a choice.

    A better approach would be to invest in underclass communities. Give now, take back later through taxes. Don't put them into absolute **** and expect them to be able to get out of it.
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    (Original post by ElephantMemory)
    You have a flawed view of underclass people. Claiming benefits, living in social housing and getting by on the absolute minimum is not a choice.

    A better approach would be to invest in underclass communities. Give now, take back later through taxes. Don't put them into absolute **** and expect them to be able to get out of it.
    The government has done this (at enormous expense, though there have been savings) and claims success

    https://www.gov.uk/government/news/p...gramme-success

    although as you can see from the figures, success in Newham, in a city with an almost insatiable need for unskilled labour, is a rate of workless households of those targeted of 99.5%. Think how much worse the position would have been if the scheme had failed.

    https://www.gov.uk/government/upload...y_results.xlsx
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    The government has done this (at enormous expense, though there have been savings) and claims success

    https://www.gov.uk/government/news/p...gramme-success

    although as you can see from the figures, success in Newham, in a city with an almost insatiable need for unskilled labour, is a rate of workless households of those targeted of 99.5%. Think how much worse the position would have been if the scheme had failed.

    https://www.gov.uk/government/upload...y_results.xlsx
    Thanks for the links. I will look through them now. Would love for this sort of approach to be rolled out across the country.
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    haha.

    Assuming that there's still a voting system in 10 years :P
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    This is a very good point and one I've made myself previously as a political capitalist.

    While i do think people are overly cynical about job prospects (most will gain some form of full time employment and a similar proportion will rise through the ranks), it is somewhat ironic that two decades of insufficient house building, inflating the supply of credit and house price growth well in excess of wages is putting the right of the future in jeopardy. Regardless of whether or not these people are viewed as class traitors, the Tories of the 50's and 80's dominated because they tapped into the aspiration of the working poor and a big part of this was the dream of a property owning democracy. Owning a property manufactured political consent, even Labour were part of this consensus last decade.

    As a political capitalist i say that we should take a leaf out of MacMillan's book and build a million social houses on top of the private sector builds. Combined with the existing right to buy, the result would be a glorious affirmation of aspiration from the Tories and indeed one Tory group containing Tim Montgomerie and Michael Gove supports such a policy.
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    They will vote for driftawaay in 10 years time
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    (Original post by ElephantMemory)
    Lucky indeed. Only unwise idiots want to help the vulnerable. We should all just agree to let them idiots rot in their council houses.
    Nice strawman. There are other ways to help the vulnerable other than taxing people to destitution.
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    (Original post by Gears265)
    Yeh I had that phase briefly for less than a year in 2009, I have been a proud right winger since. We are unwise when we are young, luckily I grew out of it quickly.
    My trajectory was exactly the opposite. I believed the Tory *******s for less than a year around the 2010 election. The shine went off soon after the election when they passed the Fixed Term Parliaments Act and they have been subverting democracy ever since with four measures in the works at present to shore up their tiny majority - all unrecorded by the media of course.
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    (Original post by scrotgrot)
    My trajectory was exactly the opposite. I believed the Tory *******s for less than a year around the 2010 election. The shine went off soon after the election when they passed the Fixed Term Parliaments Act and they have been subverting democracy ever since with four measures in the works at present to shore up their tiny majority - all unrecorded by the media of course.
    My period was less political in the sense of mainstream politics, I was more left leaning for that time because of issues like the Environment, Equal rights, LGBT rights, animal rights and so on, my views on the matter never changed, just from there I have been engaged in economics and political policy which has moved me to the right. I prefer practicality and financial policy over policy merely being dictated by the heart and emotion.
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    (Original post by Gears265)
    My period was less political in the sense of mainstream politics, I was more left leaning for that time because of issues like the Environment, Equal rights, LGBT rights, animal rights and so on, my views on the matter never changed, just from there I have been engaged in economics and political policy which has moved me to the right. I prefer practicality and financial policy over policy merely being dictated by the heart and emotion.
    Then I struggle to understand how you can support fiscal contractionist economics.
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    (Original post by scrotgrot)
    Then I struggle to understand how you can support fiscal contractionist economics.
    Why do you struggle to understand? I have made no indication of any opposition to austerity or budget cuts. Or do you mean you do not understand why I have my views on the basis you disagree with them?
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    (Original post by Gears265)
    Why do you struggle to understand? I have made no indication of any opposition to austerity or budget cuts. Or do you mean you do not understand why I have my views on the basis you disagree with them?
    No, it's just that if you take anything resembling a sober evidence based look at economics - as opposed to dogma based on for example how lazy unemployed people must be - it's clear that, for example, recent Labour offerings have been better than Tory ones.
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    (Original post by scrotgrot)
    No, it's just that if you take anything resembling a sober evidence based look at economics - as opposed to dogma based on for example how lazy unemployed people must be - it's clear that, for example, recent Labour offerings have been better than Tory ones.
    We could sit here all day and talk about our perception of the most effective (more importantly most sustainable) economic model but something tells me its best to agree to disagree. I am pro austerity while you yourself anti-austerity, lets leave it at that before we veer too off topic.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    Immigrant attitudes matter as well. The first generation of immigrants from the 1950-1970s joined heavily unionised industrial workplaces and most anti-immigrant rhetoric came from Conservative politicians. Their allegiance to Labour was fixed and unbending. It isn't quite as simple now. 1 million ethnic minority voters voted Tory at the last election; 1.6 million Labour. The rest were also rans. The threat of Brexit is increasing the number of EU nationals taking British citizenship. Not sure how well hard left socialism plays to a Polish plumber.
    So mass immigration and an open door policy will help protect the UK from falling in to the hands of the left.
 
 
 
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