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    I got A*AABBBBBBB (I know, not that good) and haven't done my A-Levels yet. Could I still do Law at a good uni?
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    While more emphasis is placed on your A-level results, GCSE results will aid admissions when deciding on two closely match candidates. Some do have minimum requirements and the only way to find those is to look at the university websites you wish to join!
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    (Original post by _Lizabeth_)
    I got A*AABBBBBBB (I know, not that good) and haven't done my A-Levels yet. Could I still do Law at a good uni?
    Yes, those results (which are good results) wouldn't hinder you studying law at a good university. You'd maybe have a harder time than the average applicant for Oxbridge, UCL/KCL/LSE and Durham but providing you're on course for good A-Level results coupled with an enthusiastic personal statement (particularly for LSE) and good admissions test scores/interviews (where applicable), you'll be fine.

    I know (given you haven't done A-Levels yet) it's still early days but do you know of any universities you're interested in applying to?
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    (Original post by Caitlan)
    Yes, those results (which are good results) wouldn't hinder you studying law at a good university. You'd maybe have a harder time than the average applicant for Oxbridge, UCL/KCL/LSE and Durham but providing you're on course for good A-Level results coupled with an enthusiastic personal statement (particularly for LSE) and good admissions test scores/interviews (where applicable), you'll be fine.

    I know (given you haven't done A-Levels yet) it's still early days but do you know of any universities you're interested in applying to?
    I was thinking Durham, RG universities and LSE but I know LSE asks for more A*s and As so I'll probably be rejected by that and Oxford and Cambridge.
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    (Original post by _Lizabeth_)
    I was thinking Durham, RG universities and LSE but I know LSE asks for more A*s and As so I'll probably be rejected by that and Oxford and Cambridge.
    If you can demonstrate an upward progression from GCSE, LSE could still take you.

    Oxford and Cambridge could still take you but you would be applying with the knowledge that the average applicant has better GCSE scores.

    GCSEs aren't detrimental unless you're applying for Medicine so keep optimistic.

    Also, your application can be sent to 5 universities so will very likely get offers.
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    (Original post by Caitlan)
    If you can demonstrate an upward progression from GCSE, LSE could still take you.

    Oxford and Cambridge could still take you but you would be applying with the knowledge that the average applicant has better GCSE scores.

    GCSEs aren't detrimental unless you're applying for Medicine so keep optimistic.

    Also, your application can be sent to 5 universities so will very likely get offers.
    Wow, thank you so much! I was so depressed and worried just thinking about this. Thank you
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    Would probably have a impact at the likes of Durham Nottingham Warwick Bristol (A*AA- AAA super competitive law schools). I got BBBCC at GCSE but got ABB at A level and I am currently at UEA doing Law, my gcse's had no effect on my application at all when receiving offers from my universities (Lancaster - AAA, Liverpool - ABB, UEA - AAB, Sussex- AAA and City university - ABB) So again my point is, universities will take a holistic approach to gcse's, predictions and AS matter more for Law, but gcse's do play a factor.
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    (Original post by _Lizabeth_)
    Wow, thank you so much! I was so depressed and worried just thinking about this. Thank you
    Don't worry about it. Admissions departments aren't robots who cut off anyone below a certain GCSE benchmarks. They're experienced groups of people trained to identify aptitude and potential. Your application is viewed holistically and so whilst application to top universities will inevitably be difficult because of the competition, being unhappy about one part of your application isn't really necessary.

    If it helps, I messed around a lot during GCSE year (and got moved a good few miles away from my school site due to asbestos) and so was pretty miserable about my GCSE results all the way through year 12. It has worked out alright for me so far
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    (Original post by Caitlan)
    Don't worry about it. Admissions departments aren't robots who cut off anyone below a certain GCSE benchmarks. They're experienced groups of people trained to identify aptitude and potential. Your application is viewed holistically and so whilst application to top universities will inevitably be difficult because of the competition, being unhappy about one part of your application isn't really necessary.

    If it helps, I messed around a lot during GCSE year (and got moved a good few miles away from my school site due to asbestos) and so was pretty miserable about my GCSE results all the way through year 12. It has worked out alright for me so far
    Yeah thanks - I'm going to a sixth form right now with A*-B 60% but I'm thinking of moving to another one closer to me that's 49% (my old high school), not really happy at my current one and having a hard time settling in but the thing is I don't want to move there for friends, who keep asking me to come back and since it's the first week, I still can, and then get bad grades when I might do better here. Any advice on that? (Sorry, I'm just really confused right now :/)
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    (Original post by _Lizabeth_)
    Yeah thanks - I'm going to a sixth form right now with A*-B 60% but I'm thinking of moving to another one closer to me that's 49% (my old high school), not really happy at my current one and having a hard time settling in but the thing is I don't want to move there for friends, who keep asking me to come back and since it's the first week, I still can, and then get bad grades when I might do better here. Any advice on that? (Sorry, I'm just really confused right now :/)
    I can't say for sure because everything depends on your circumstances but based on your info, I'd be inclined to recommend maybe moving back. Issues settling in (whilst they may be temporary) may impact your studies to some degree and well, on a human level those types of issues aren't fun. If you're in a settled school environment, you can focus on your subjects more. Grade statistics aren't all they're cracked up to be - Providing the place has a decent standard of teaching (which you could evaluate based on your attending high school there), it seems like the right option.

    I would however, recommend (if you do move) speaking to your friends and letting them know that you plan on taking your studies seriously and being more stern with them if they encourage you to mess around. Sure it won't make you the most popular person but having friends at a school need not be a hindrance unless you make it in to one.
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    (Original post by Caitlan)
    Yes, those results (which are good results) wouldn't hinder you studying law at a good university. You'd maybe have a harder time than the average applicant for Oxbridge, UCL/KCL/LSE and Durham but providing you're on course for good A-Level results coupled with an enthusiastic personal statement (particularly for LSE) and good admissions test scores/interviews (where applicable), you'll be fine.

    I know (given you haven't done A-Levels yet) it's still early days but do you know of any universities you're interested in applying to?
    Hi, thought I'll just jump in.. I actually achieved the same GCSE's and have done my AS levels where I achieved: History (A), Sociology (A), Media Studies (A) and Media Studies (B). I made the decision to drop English language as many universities specifically ask for 3 A-levels and do not 4. I am expecting to achieve A*/A's and I am hoping to take the LNAT soon.

    Are my A-levels suitable to study law at university? (Are these A-levels/grades acceptable?
    Are they 'normal' for a student who wants to apply to study law? I am aware that media studies can be considered a non-traditional subject)
    Should I take the EPQ? (Extended Project Qualification) or is that not necessary if I am taking LNAT?
    What are my chances of getting into the top universities in England? (e.g. UCL)
    Any tips on how I should write my personal statement?
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    I achieved 5 A's 5 B's and a C at GCSE. Will this be too much of a problem applying to the likes of Bristol and York for LLB Law?
 
 
 

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