Turn on thread page Beta

Editing: Should I freelance? watch

Announcements
  • View Poll Results: Editing: Should I Freelance?
    Yes
    66.67%
    No
    0
    0%
    I don't know
    0
    0%
    Wait until you've got more experience
    33.33%

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I've attached a file seeing as I couldn't copy and paste it, and the message is quite long. Please read it and let me know what you think!

    -Alicia
    Attached Files
  1. File Type: docx Editing: Should I Freelance?.docx (8.5 KB, 74 views)
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Bump
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Yep, this has failed xD
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Hey Alicia.

    Yeah, I know from personal experience that, as a general rule, there's a limit to how long a post on here can be before people decide it's not worth the time reading and tune out. :laugh: Sorry you've not got any answers to date.

    I don't know much about editing itself, but as someone who plans to go into freelance web development at some point, I've done a fair bit of reading on freelancing generally, so I think I'm at least slightly-qualified to answer this.

    Looking at the rates you're planning to charge, you sound like you want to start freelancing as a side project, rather than as your sole means of income. If that much is true and freelancing won't be your only means of income, I'd say absolutely go ahead and do it. If you can get your feet wet early on whilst you're financially-stable, why wouldn't you? You'll be getting an early taste of what freelancing involves and the hard work it requires, and earning a bit of extra money whilst simultaneously gaining some experience - it's win-win.
    Don't worry about being unskilled - judging by how long you've been writing on WattPad and how you currently type you've clearly got some experience, and the rest is only going to be gained when you throw yourself out there.

    If you are interested in doing it, don't limit yourself to just friends or people your age - there are a ton of tried-and-tested websites that are designed to take the hard part out of freelancing by bringing clients to you. About a year ago now, I made a profile on one, Fiverr.com - clients pay for freelancers to do anything from small jobs to huge ones. Despite having no experience in doing jobs for clients, I was on it as a freelancer for about three months and made a grand total of £40 GBP by making varying changes to clients' websites, anything from replacing some text to designing a website footer. £40 is nothing at all for the hours I put in, and it was essentially cheap labour, but I'd always known this - I just wanted a platform where I could get stuck in and get some experience with real-world clients, something I'd been missing up till that point. I managed to get plenty of that, plus a bit of money on the side. So if you are interested, I really recommend you start on a platform like Fiverr, test the water of having active clients that you're doing work for, and seeing how you find it.

    Hopefully that helps, let me know if you've got any more questions.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Hashim123)
    Hey Alicia.

    Yeah, I know from personal experience that, as a general rule, there's a limit to how long a post on here can be before people decide it's not worth the time reading and tune out. :laugh: Sorry you've not got any answers to date.

    I don't know much about editing itself, but as someone who plans to go into freelance web development at some point, I've done a fair bit of reading on freelancing generally, so I think I'm at least slightly-qualified to answer this.

    Looking at the rates you're planning to charge, you sound like you want to start freelancing as a side project, rather than as your sole means of income. If that much is true and freelancing won't be your only means of income, I'd say absolutely go ahead and do it. If you can get your feet wet early on whilst you're financially-stable, why wouldn't you? You'll be getting an early taste of what freelancing involves and the hard work it requires, and earning a bit of extra money whilst simultaneously gaining some experience - it's win-win.
    Don't worry about being unskilled - judging by how long you've been writing on WattPad and how you currently type you've clearly got some experience, and the rest is only going to be gained when you throw yourself out there.

    If you are interested in doing it, don't limit yourself to just friends or people your age - there are a ton of tried-and-tested websites that are designed to take the hard part out of freelancing by bringing clients to you. About a year ago now, I made a profile on one, Fiverr.com - clients pay for freelancers to do anything from small jobs to huge ones. Despite having no experience in doing jobs for clients, I was on it as a freelancer for about three months and made a grand total of £40 GBP by making varying changes to clients' websites, anything from replacing some text to designing a website footer. £40 is nothing at all for the hours I put in, and it was essentially cheap labour, but I'd always known this - I just wanted a platform where I could get stuck in and get some experience with real-world clients, something I'd been missing up till that point. I managed to get plenty of that, plus a bit of money on the side. So if you are interested, I really recommend you start on a platform like Fiverr, test the water of having active clients that you're doing work for, and seeing how you find it.

    Hopefully that helps, let me know if you've got any more questions.
    Hi! Yeah, the message is a bit long. I think I got a bit carried away.
    Thank you so much for this! I was expecting responses to be a little bit more critical (due to my lack of experience), but this response means a lot to me. I will definitely make sure to check out that site you reccommended. Thanks again
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Tldr but I'm a freelance editor/proofreader with my own website so if you want some help or info, PM me

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by holson)
    Tldr but I'm a freelance editor/proofreader with my own website so if you want some help or info, PM me

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Thank you! I will
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by holson)
    Tldr but I'm a freelance editor/proofreader with my own website so if you want some help or info, PM me

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Hey, could I PM you for some advice please? I'm trying to become a paid freelance writer and blogger, and I also want to become a freelance copywriter, editor and proofreader.

    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kittykatxoxo)
    Hey, could I PM you for some advice please? I'm trying to become a paid freelance writer and blogger, and I also want to become a freelance copywriter, editor and proofreader.

    Yeah, sure
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by holson)
    Tldr but I'm a freelance editor/proofreader with my own website so if you want some help or info, PM me

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    cool, what is the url of your own website?
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by prhomhyse)
    cool, what is the url of your own website?
    I bet this will get me done for advertising lol, but proofitedit.weebly.com

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by alicia_x)
    I've attached a file seeing as I couldn't copy and paste it, and the message is quite long. Please read it and let me know what you think!

    -Alicia
    Hi OP. Firstly, you probably would've had more responses if you'd just copy and pasted your word document into your OP. But never mind. I work full-time in a similar writing-related field, and here's my advice:

    General advice:

    In freelancing, the hardest part by far is the beginning. You have no client-base and no experience. It depends on the industry, but the common advice is that you shouldn't expect to be earning a full-time wage for at least a year or two. Of course, you could make it sooner, but don't expect to. It takes time to build up experience and clients.

    So you should start as soon as possible, and if you're studying or working another job at the same time, great. That way there's no pressure to make money. You may only get one job a month at first, then perhaps two a month, and so forth. But if you start now, then by the time you finish university, you'll be able to put 3 years of experience on your CV and you'll have a fair amount of sample work that you can provide (your portfolio) if necessary.


    So, some comments on your situation specifically:

    1. Why narrow your market to 15-17 year olds? If you want to target that area, do so, but don't restrict yourself to it just because you think that's all you're good enough for. Be open to business from any source. Small, independent businesses are often willing to overlook lack of experience if it's reflected in your rates. Which leads me onto...

    2. Your rates should reflect your lack of experience, but there is such a thing as rates being too low. (A quick google will give you TONS of results on this). If you set the bar too low, people will not take you seriously. You need to research the average rates in your field and adjust yours accordingly. If an experienced editor charges £0.08 per word, you shouldn't be charging £0.01 per word. That would be ridiculous, and would also be a detriment to the profession.

    3. I wouldn't offer any words for free. For the above reasons.

    4. Include your strong points on your CV (advanced certificates, etc,), and be more confident about them. As long as you're not lying about your experience, you don't need to sell yourself short.


    The hardest thing is getting yourself known and getting your name out there at the beginning. Marketing yourself is difficult. Individuals (such as students) will give you good experience and won't expect much in terms of your experience so far, so they're a good starting point. But when it comes to going full-time, you'll want to be targeting companies and agencies that will give you regular work. They will be your bread and butter. That's fine though, because as I said above, by that point you'll be able to put on your CV that you have a degree, three years experience, an extensive range of sample work, etc.

    If you have any questions just ask.
 
 
 
Poll
Could you cope without Wifi?
Useful resources

Quick link:

Unanswered creative corner threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.