PardonMyFrench96
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So recently I got a Macbook pro. I was told I don't need any kind of security software for it, but I've never used a mac before so I don't know how reliable that is. If you use a mac what do you do?

Thanks

P.S.
I'm also slightly concerned because if you end up in slightly dodge corners of the internet (nothing weird), I always have notifications of x type of attack being blocked, or if you click a dodgy link.
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Mindspace
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It never hurts to have some kind of security software but as a rule, Macs are far less prone to viruses and malware because they are less popular than Windows computers.

Your school/college/uni may even insist on some being installed to use it on their network but will usually have some they can provide you with.

If you want peace of mind, AVG free is pretty good http://www.avg.com/gb-en/avg-antivirus-for-mac
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Cate1976
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Free version of Avast is good as well. Whatever you do, don't use Norton.
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tim_123
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There's absolutely tons of exploits for macs in the wild at the moment. Those pop ups your getting, (my gf gets the same), things like "Mac cleaner", or "warning you have a virus" type messags, please do not, I'll say that again, DO NOT click anywhere on those pop ups other than that red x to close the page. All of those pop ups will contain some form of ransomware (a virus that encrypts all your data then asks for a payment before it will unlock everything) or some form of rat (route access terminal - a virus that hides itself in a running process and "calls home", allowing the malicious user to have full control of your mac).

Get yourself some anti-virus to be on the safe side, there's plenty of free ones out there that do a good job
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Gofre
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(Original post by PardonMyFrench96)
So recently I got a Macbook pro. I was told I don't need any kind of security software for it, but I've never used a mac before so I don't know how reliable that is. If you use a mac what do you do?

Thanks

P.S.
I'm also slightly concerned because if you end up in slightly dodge corners of the internet (nothing weird), I always have notifications of x type of attack being blocked, or if you click a dodgy link.
The idea that Macs don't need antivirus is outdated now, they're a lower risk group than Windows PCs but there's enough threats made for OS X to make running antivirus a safe course of action. I recommend Malwarebytes, it's free and every bit as good as every paid solution out there.
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tim_123
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(Original post by Gofre)
The idea that Macs don't need antivirus is outdated now, they're a lower risk group than Windows PCs but there's enough threats made for OS X to make running antivirus a safe course of action. I recommend Malwarebytes, it's free and every bit as good as every paid solution out there.
This.

My Mrs still thinks you can't write malware for OS X bless her heart haha
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PardonMyFrench96
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(Original post by Cate1976)
Free version of Avast is good as well. Whatever you do, don't use Norton.
Haha, what's wrong with norton?
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bailfire
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I'd email Ashley Madison's tech department and ask for advice on what security software to use.
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PardonMyFrench96
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(Original post by Gofre)
The idea that Macs don't need antivirus is outdated now, they're a lower risk group than Windows PCs but there's enough threats made for OS X to make running antivirus a safe course of action. I recommend Malwarebytes, it's free and every bit as good as every paid solution out there.
Hey thanks. I've had a look at malwarebytes for mac, it says it just removes malware - is that enough?
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GiantKiwi
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(Original post by PardonMyFrench96)
Hey thanks. I've had a look at malwarebytes for mac, it says it just removes malware - is that enough?
Not even close.

You would still need antivirus software alongside that.

ESET Cybersecurity or Intego Mac Internet Security are the best options for them, neither are free but free antivirus' are generally garbage as it is. Also, £30-40 isn't particularly significant for a piece of software as essential as antivirus.
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Jessica Watts
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There are less viruses on Macs, but I think you should install untivirus..Just in case..
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PardonMyFrench96
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(Original post by iainvg)
Not even close.

You would still need antivirus software alongside that.

ESET Cybersecurity or Intego Mac Internet Security are the best options for them, neither are free but free antivirus' are generally garbage as it is. Also, £30-40 isn't particularly significant for a piece of software as essential as antivirus.
Hi, thanks for the reply.I dont mind paying for antivirus software but everywhere I look I get a different response in terms of what's needed. I haven't heard of ESET/Intego before at all - do you use them? I currently use norton on a pc - it's been fine for me, so would that be a terrible option for a mac?
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GiantKiwi
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(Original post by PardonMyFrench96)
Hi, thanks for the reply.I dont mind paying for antivirus software but everywhere I look I get a different response in terms of what's needed. I haven't heard of ESET/Intego before at all - do you use them? I currently use norton on a pc - it's been fine for me, so would that be a terrible option for a mac?
I have ESET supplied by work and use Intego at home, but I prefer the coverage and ease of use in Intego. Norton is not great, its a bit of a resource hog on OSX. ESET does a student discount - http://www.eset.co.uk/Student - which makes it by far the cheapest option, and far, far better than Norton, but Intego is still better on overall protection.
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PardonMyFrench96
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(Original post by iainvg)
I have ESET supplied by work and use Intego at home, but I prefer the coverage and ease of use in Intego. Norton is not great, its a bit of a resource hog on OSX. ESET does a student discount - http://www.eset.co.uk/Student - which makes it by far the cheapest option, and far, far better than Norton, but Intego is still better on overall protection.
So if intego gives better protection - I'll go with that. I don't need anything else with it? (so I'll uninstall malwarebytes?) I think my uni provides sophos if you don't have anything - would that be decent?
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GiantKiwi
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(Original post by PardonMyFrench96)
I think my uni provides sophos if you don't have anything - would that be decent?
Nope, that's one of the worst resource hogging AV's out there, the reason your uni can give those out so easily as very few people are actually willing to buy it.
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alexschmalex
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I've been on OS X for the last 7 years and have never had any need for an antivirus, as long as you use common sense in the sites you visit you'll honestly be fine
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JoshLL
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There is no such thing as a totally secure system. Windows is the most popular operating system which means if you can hack it you'll get more personal information. Therefore, more people are trying to steal your **** on windows. However, Mac OS is the second most used operating system.
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The advice for security would be the same for whatever OS you're going to use. Have an anti-virus protection AND an anti-malware protection. Anti-malware is there to give your computer a quick check if performance changes. If you want to find out the best Anti-Virus suite to use for Mac, google it. Google is always your friend.
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Subspace
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(Original post by JoshLL)
There is no such thing as a totally secure system. Windows is the most popular operating system which means if you can hack it you'll get more personal information. Therefore, more people are trying to steal your **** on windows. However, Mac OS is the second most used operating system.
Image
The advice for security would be the same for whatever OS you're going to use. Have an anti-virus protection AND an anti-malware protection. Anti-malware is there to give your computer a quick check if performance changes. If you want to find out the best Anti-Virus suite to use for Mac, google it. Google is always your friend.
You only need one or the other... Never run more than one antivirus at one time.

Malware is the more general term, malicious software. Viruses make up a small percentage of all known malware.

An antivirus likely protects against all threats so you don't need a separate anti malware program, unless you need an ondemand scanner that scans the computer only when it is run.

@op, all operating systems need some sort of malicious protection. OS X has more vulnerabilities than Windows, surprisingly.

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JoshLL
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(Original post by SkyJP)
You only need one or the other... Never run more than one antivirus at one time.

Malware is the more general term, malicious software. Viruses make up a small percentage of all known malware.

An antivirus likely protects against all threats so you don't need a separate anti malware program, unless you need an ondemand scanner that scans the computer only when it is run.

@op, all operating systems need some sort of malicious protection. OS X has more vulnerabilities than Windows, surprisingly.

Posted from TSR Mobile
You don't run them together, Anti-Viruses have large databases of malware which is old and known about. Malwarebytes anti-malware keeps you protected from Zero Day exploits which haven't quite got into the anti-virus databases yet. You have the anti-malware there for when you notice a change in your computer's performance. You can give it a quick scan to make sure it's not malware. Ofcourse you don't run them at the same time, doing so will cause performance issues and stability issues.
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(Original post by JoshLL)
You don't run them together, Anti-Viruses have large databases of malware which is old and known about. Malwarebytes anti-malware keeps you protected from Zero Day exploits which haven't quite got into the anti-virus databases yet. You have the anti-malware there for when you notice a change in your computer's performance. You can give it a quick scan to make sure it's not malware. Ofcourse you don't run them at the same time, doing so will cause performance issues and stability issues.
Of course, that is all dependent on which antivirus you're using. The best antiviruses, well most of them, contain HIPS, behaviour blockers and/or cloud protection, and this protects extremely well against all malicious software, including zero-day malware (example: ESET responds the fastest to zero-day malware than any other security vendor, and quickly updates their database). The best antivirus vendors such as Emsisoft/ESET/Kaspersky/Norton use these features to their advantage.

On demand scanners such as Malwarebytes, Emsisoft Emergency Kit, and Hitman Pro are best at removal of malware when they're already on your system, and not as good as real-time protection provided by antiviruses that run in the background, which are for prevention (the first line of defense) to prevent the damage in the first place.

IMO on-demand scanners are behind in terms of protection. Real-time policy-based scanning for a background antivirus can block even the never-before-seen zero day malware, and since on-demand scanners do not run in the background, they are dependent on signature updates, while other vendors have already got protection. Nonetheless you should have on-demand scanners, such as Emsisoft Emergency Kit and Hitman Pro, to name the best, and you should run a combination of them occasionally (as one does not detect all the threats) since some of the precisely coded and best malware will not impact performance, so the user may never know.

The best Mac security software comes from ESET Cyber Security for Mac and Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac, both paid, but avast! is a decent option as well (though its Windows version is mediocre).
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