Turn on thread page Beta

5*5 programme watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    I've been using the 5*5 programme the past month for squats, deadlifts and bench. I've seen some progress, I wanted to see if there's anyone who's stuck with the programme for a prolonged period of time and the effect it had.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    I'm using this programme, I do squats, bench press, barbell row's/Military press and dead-lift. I've made significant process. My diet, calorie, protein intake as well as the amount of rest I have is vital.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CompSci89)
    I'm using this programme, I do squats, bench press, barbell row's/Military press and dead-lift. I've made significant process. My diet, calorie, protein intake as well as the amount of rest I have is vital.
    Sweet. How long have you been using it for? My main concern is by doing 5*5 too much I will keep growing stronger but I will not see as many gains. So after a certain period I'm thinking of switching to lower wright, higher reps , more time under tension and less rest.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    I've been doing the 5*5 for over a month and I have seen very impressive gains as well as strength.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Probably not the answer you're hoping for but in the past I have spent a while using 3-5x5 on squats and presses and a single set of 5 on deadlifts. My squat progress was always good though hindered by repeated injury (not directly caused by 5x5 squats but helped by squatting less often) and I made good deadlift progress. However, I've never had much success increasing my bench press or overhead press with long rests and sets of 5. Plenty of others have though, and even now I don't actually know why I couldn't make it work. If I had to guess I'd say lack of volume was the problem so I'd probably
    definitely advise on (for example) 5x5 over 3x5 but yeah take that with a grain of salt as I don't really know.

    I'm currently experimenting with some higher volume stuff where I pick a number of reps and complete that many reps in as many sets as I like, I can't comment on whether it will be any good for me yet though!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Absolutely.

    5*5 is a hugely effective and proven way to grow strength.

    To give a more detailed answer... Assuming the program is done the recommended times per week (3X) then that is enough frequency with which to grow. In addition to this the load is sufficient enough to grow (above 75% of 1RM) and at sufficient volume. Since muscular growth is directly related to the above three factors then this is a perfect program to meet the above criteria.

    I have used it myself and made great progress and it is my template to fall back on whenever I reach a training plateau.
    • Political Ambassador
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Political Ambassador
    Never really stuck with it, did a 6 week stint of it a while ago but wasn't impressed and found it boring as ****. 2 sets to failure (with warmup sets where needed) served me well as a beginner, 3 years later still using it as a mainstay with other styles of training here and there. My main goal is hypertrophy/bodybuilding with strength as a secondary goal for progressive overload purposes. Been training for 3 years, no injuries, made great progress on both goals.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by WoodyMKC)
    Never really stuck with it, did a 6 week stint of it a while ago but wasn't impressed and found it boring as ****. 2 sets to failure (with warmup sets where needed) served me well as a beginner, 3 years later still using it as a mainstay with other styles of training here and there. My main goal is hypertrophy/bodybuilding with strength as a secondary goal for progressive overload purposes. Been training for 3 years, no injuries, made great progress on both goals.
    Just curious, how did you or would you determine when to add weight doing 2 sets to failure?
    • Political Ambassador
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Political Ambassador
    (Original post by Implication)
    Just curious, how did you or would you determine when to add weight doing 2 sets to failure?
    Use the first workset as a measuring tool + maximum effort. So if you did, let's say for simplicity, a 100kg squat for 6 reps to failure (safety pins obviously necessary) on that first set. Then the next time you do that exercise, you try as hard as you can (without breaking form/cheating) to go for 7 reps. Then 8 reps next time. Then 9. Then 10. Once you hit 10 reps, increase the weight by 10% the following workout which should put you down to 6-7 reps again and repeat the cycle. You basically then just use the second set to failure as extra work to achieve adequate workload.

    Some workouts you might fail to progress, others you might increase by several reps between workouts, but if you genuinely get stuck for a few workouts then take a deload.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by WoodyMKC)
    Use the first workset as a measuring tool + maximum effort. So if you did, let's say for simplicity, a 100kg squat for 6 reps to failure (safety pins obviously necessary) on that first set. Then the next time you do that exercise, you try as hard as you can (without breaking form/cheating) to go for 7 reps. Then 8 reps next time. Then 9. Then 10. Once you hit 10 reps, increase the weight by 10% the following workout which should put you down to 6-7 reps again and repeat the cycle. You basically then just use the second set to failure as extra work to achieve adequate workload.

    Some workouts you might fail to progress, others you might increase by several reps between workouts, but if you genuinely get stuck for a few workouts then take a deload.
    Yeah sounds like what I was expecting. I've struggled to make 3x5, 5x5 etc. work so I've recently started choosing a number of reps and just hitting that in as many sets as necessary. Progression scheme basically what you've described - first set to gauge progress; rest just to make up the volume/workload.

    Hopefully this will work!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by stochasticking)
    Sweet. How long have you been using it for? My main concern is by doing 5*5 too much I will keep growing stronger but I will not see as many gains. So after a certain period I'm thinking of switching to lower wright, higher reps , more time under tension and less rest.
    5x5 is a hugely effective way to gain strength. Specially if you follow Stronglifts 5x5 like I did. I would say stick to it for 8 weeks or so doing it consistently 3 times a week and then shift to a different workout plan.
    • Political Ambassador
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Political Ambassador
    (Original post by Implication)
    Yeah sounds like what I was expecting. I've struggled to make 3x5, 5x5 etc. work so I've recently started choosing a number of reps and just hitting that in as many sets as necessary. Progression scheme basically what you've described - first set to gauge progress; rest just to make up the volume/workload.

    Hopefully this will work!
    It's weird actually, it was the first training style I ever did after reading a lot before starting and reading a little about how Dorian Yates used to train in his earlier days, didn't become a fan of his or anything at that point but I liked the two-sets-to-failure system he used to use. Then I later did become a fan of his, started using his one-set-beyond-failure system and then eventually went back to using the two-set system again 3 years later :lol: So I guess you could say I've gone full circle, but in a way I've always preferred the low-volume/high-intensity style of training; no ****ing about, just warm-up, then push yourself to your absolute limit in a couple of sets and the job is done, and it couldn't be simpler to gauge progress.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by alexorlandocross)
    Absolutely.

    5*5 is a hugely effective and proven way to grow strength.

    To give a more detailed answer... Assuming the program is done the recommended times per week (3X) then that is enough frequency with which to grow. In addition to this the load is sufficient enough to grow (above 75% of 1RM) and at sufficient volume. Since muscular growth is directly related to the above three factors then this is a perfect program to meet the above criteria.

    I have used it myself and made great progress and it is my template to fall back on whenever I reach a training plateau.
    Thanks for the feedback I am making some good gains as well strength. I think I'm going to stick to 5*5 with compounds and do the higher volume stuff with isolation exercises like biceps curls etc. When you say three times a week, do you mean deadlift 3* a week, squat 3 times a week etc? Or altogether?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Implication)
    Probably not the answer you're hoping for but in the past I have spent a while using 3-5x5 on squats and presses and a single set of 5 on deadlifts. My squat progress was always good though hindered by repeated injury (not directly caused by 5x5 squats but helped by squatting less often) and I made good deadlift progress. However, I've never had much success increasing my bench press or overhead press with long rests and sets of 5. Plenty of others have though, and even now I don't actually know why I couldn't make it work. If I had to guess I'd say lack of volume was the problem so I'd probably
    definitely advise on (for example) 5x5 over 3x5 but yeah take that with a grain of salt as I don't really know.

    I'm currently experimenting with some higher volume stuff where I pick a number of reps and complete that many reps in as many sets as I like, I can't comment on whether it will be any good for me yet though!
    I tend to keep rests quite short in between bench and shoulder presses whereas I have long rest intervals between deadlifts and squats. Try shorten the rest .
    Sweet. My friend were debating whether to do this and I think it's good to mix it up after a while, especially if you want more conditioning.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by undead345)
    5x5 is a hugely effective way to gain strength. Specially if you follow Stronglifts 5x5 like I did. I would say stick to it for 8 weeks or so doing it consistently 3 times a week and then shift to a different workout plan.
    Thanks. I'm going to stick to it until I see a plateau which I presume will be around 8-10 weeks.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    I did stronglifts 5x5 for about 4 or 5 months of training three times a week (and eating whatever I wanted to frequently) before I got bored and switched.

    Stats (one rep maxes):
    DL 60kg-145kg
    Squat 50kg-100kg
    Bench 35kg-72.5kg
    Row 40kg-60kg
    OHP 35kg-45kg

    and I went from weighing 61 kg to 69 kg
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    PS Reviewer
    I did SS which is 3x5. I made great progress. I do a bit of 5x5 now and it's still great.

    I am somewhat reluctant to recommend going to failure for a beginner, you don't know how to lift fully yet, your form won't be amazing so personally it sounds quite snappy imo. But meh, find what you like and what works.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by stochasticking)
    Thanks for the feedback I am making some good gains as well strength. I think I'm going to stick to 5*5 with compounds and do the higher volume stuff with isolation exercises like biceps curls etc. When you say three times a week, do you mean deadlift 3* a week, squat 3 times a week etc? Or altogether?
    I would do something like

    Mon: Squat, Bench, Row

    Wed: Squat, deadlift, overhead press, row

    Fri: Squat, bench, row

    Isolation work isn't mandatory when volume is sufficient on compounds but for the sake of ego I'd throw whatever your personal preference is and probably use a 3x8 or 2x12 rep range
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by alexorlandocross)
    I would do something like

    Mon: Squat, Bench, Row

    Wed: Squat, deadlift, overhead press, row

    Fri: Squat, bench, row

    Isolation work isn't mandatory when volume is sufficient on compounds but for the sake of ego I'd throw whatever your personal preference is and probably use a 3x8 or 2x12 rep range
    Thank you! I do not deadlift or squat enough! Only once a week each.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Angry cucumber)
    I did SS which is 3x5. I made great progress. I do a bit of 5x5 now and it's still great.

    I am somewhat reluctant to recommend going to failure for a beginner, you don't know how to lift fully yet, your form won't be amazing so personally it sounds quite snappy imo. But meh, find what you like and what works.
    I've worked on my form for a while. I've been training on and off for years but never really used 5*5 or any strength training before. I had some time off because if Ramadan and got sick after. But now I'm back into the swing of things.
 
 
 
Poll
How are you feeling in the run-up to Results Day 2018?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.