Political Correctness is a PC term for censorship Watch

Drunken Bard
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Here is a video similar to what I am trying to say

I hate poitical correctness.

The very nature of it makes me angry.

Time and time again we see comedians or musicians ridiculed for their opinions, or politicians with opinions which do not fulfil the status quo being dismissed.

For instance, it's perfectly okay to berate someone for smoking. However if you say to someone else that they are obese due to eating nothing but fast food which is probably just as bad as smoking, you are deemed as "insensitive" and being a "fat shamer".

You're allowed to wax lyrical about the Catholic church, but raise any sort of criticism of any other religion and you are "intolerant" or more often "racist".

The best example of political correctness consistently censoring language is with PTSD.

It was at first called Shell Shock

Then it became Battle Fatigue because Shell Shock was deemed "too insensitive"

Now we have Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, in a decades time it will probably be called "Post Trauma - Battle Inoperability" Because the word "Disorder" is too insensitive..

I am sick to death of people, primarily on the left who keep telling people what they SHOULD think and what they SHOULD say.

The fact that we teach our children to not try too succeed any more because it might hurt other children's feelings is where society is going to fail in the future.

We really need to grow thicker skin as a nation.
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Quady
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(Original post by Drunken Bard)
I hate poitical correctness.

The very nature of it makes me angry.

I am sick to death of people, primarily on the left who keep telling people what they SHOULD think and what they SHOULD say.


We really need to grow thicker skin as a nation.
Yes, yes you should. You're too easily offended girly man.
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Drunken Bard
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(Original post by Quady)
Yes, yes you should. You're too easily offended girly man.
Oh stop it you x
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Quady
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(Original post by Drunken Bard)
It was at first called Shell Shock
At first it was called cowardice
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shell_shock#Cowardice
But that wasn't 'PC' so another name 'shell shock' had to be made up because coward was deemed "too insensitive".
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Drunken Bard
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(Original post by Quady)
At first it was called cowardice
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shell_shock#Cowardice
But that wasn't 'PC' so another name 'shell shock' had to be made up because coward was deemed "too insensitive".
There is a difference between language and people being unjustly put on trial.
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Quady
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(Original post by Drunken Bard)
There is a difference between language and people being unjustly put on trial.
Unjustly?

(Original post by Drunken Bard)
We really need to grow thicker skin as a nation.
Yes, and it started in 1915.
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username1221160
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Yup, I really miss those days when it was okay to call those with missing limbs cripples, those with learning difficulties retards, gay men puffs, and black people *******.
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Drunken Bard
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(Original post by Quantex)
Yup, I really miss those days when it was okay to call those with missing limbs cripples, those with learning difficulties retards, gay men puffs, and black people *******.
If you're that old, you shouldn't really be on a website called the Student room
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Drunken Bard
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(Original post by Quady)



Yes, and it started in 1915.
And ended in 1997
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VladThe1mpaler
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pretty sure PTSD isn't called "shell shock" or "battle fatigue" anymore because it's a disorder which effects more than just people who have fought in wars

do you also think we should still call those suffering from down's syndrome "mongols"?

i know where you're coming from with the whole "PC gone mad" thing, but your examples are stupid. There is nothing wrong with coming up with better, less offensive names for things as people's attitudes change. You sound like you basically just want to be able to say whatever you want even if it is offensive.
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username1221160
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(Original post by Drunken Bard)
If you're that old, you shouldn't really be on a website called the Student room
Well, I'm a student so why shouldn't I be here?

I'm curious, do you use the N word to refer to black people or do you use more politically correct terms? While political correctness can get ridiculous at times and I realise it is in vogue to criticise it, most of those who rail against it are politically correct themselves.
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The_Mighty_Bush
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(Original post by Quantex)
Yup, I really miss those days when it was okay to call those with missing limbs cripples, those with learning difficulties retards, gay men puffs, and black people *******.
Its a lot more than that and you know it.
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L'Allegro
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(Original post by Drunken Bard)
I hate poitical correctness.

The very nature of it makes me angry.

Time and time again we see comedians or musicians ridiculed for their opinions, or politicians with opinions which do not fulfil the status quo being dismissed.

For instance, it's perfectly okay to berate someone for smoking. However if you say to someone else that they are obese due to eating nothing but fast food which is probably just as bad as smoking, you are deemed as "insensitive" and being a "fat shamer".

You're allowed to wax lyrical about the Catholic church, but raise any sort of criticism of any other religion and you are "intolerant" or more often "racist".

The best example of political correctness consistently censoring language is with PTSD.

It was at first called Shell Shock

Then it became Battle Fatigue because Shell Shock was deemed "too insensitive"

Now we have Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, in a decades time it will probably be called "Post Trauma - Battle Inoperability" Because the word "Disorder" is too insensitive..

I am sick to death of people, primarily on the left who keep telling people what they SHOULD think and what they SHOULD say.

The fact that we teach our children to not try too succeed any more because it might hurt other children's feelings is where society is going to fail in the future.

We really need to grow thicker skin as a nation.
First, I'm not sure you understand the phrase 'to wax lyrical'.

Second, I really don't think that trying to encourage greater discursive sensitivity is an awful thing. There is an adage somewhere that satire and parody should comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable. I think that people should keep this in mind when exercising their right to free speech. I think that recognizing that language affects our view of the world is essential, and allowing stigmatizing language towards disadvantaged groups is indicative of a regressive, rather than a progressive, society.
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i<3milkshake
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The way I see it is that politically correct people feel they are protecting people. For example, don't discriminate against or be horrible to gay people/other minorities etc.

However, political correctness has now got to the point that certain people can be harmed and now not allowed to speak. Don't like waiting two weeks to see a GP? racist. Don't like seeing the culture of a place change rapidly due to high immigration? Racist.

So I think while politically correct views do have a place in a civilised world, when politically correct really means "say the nice thing and screw the truth" it really has to be brought down a notch.

I mean without political correctness disabled (mentally or physically) people would not have the same attention for their needs as they get today, and looking back it is a good thing that has happened. So while today it has gone too far, it shouldn't be forgottenthat actually it is important to have (to an extent).
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L'Allegro
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(Original post by i<3milkshake)
The way I see it is that politically correct people feel they are protecting people. For example, don't discriminate against or be horrible to gay people/other minorities etc.

However, political correctness has now got to the point that certain people can be harmed and now not allowed to speak. Don't like waiting two weeks to see a GP? racist. Don't like seeing the culture of a place change rapidly due to high immigration? Racist.

So I think while politically correct views do have a place in a civilised world, when politically correct really means "say the nice thing and screw the truth" it really has to be brought down a notch.

I mean without political correctness disabled (mentally or physically) people would not have the same attention for their needs as they get today, and looking back it is a good thing that has happened. So while today it has gone too far, it shouldn't be forgottenthat actually it is important to have (to an extent).
The thing is, people see this as racist because of the underlying assumptions one is making.

1. Our likes and dislikes aren't just arbitrary preferences. They're formed by certain premises and beliefs.
2. Applying this to the 'culture changing' dislike, let's examine what premises might be at work.
3. People might dislike a culture changing because they feel that their culture is superior. This seems an uncontroversial point.
4. Given they must necessarily feel that their culture is superior to another, one then needs to look at whose culture they think the initial culture is superior to.
5. The culture perceived as undesirable, because inferior, is typically a foreign one.
6. The 'foreign' culture is typically a culture associated with a race.

7. Therefore, the belief in the superiority of one's culture can be demonstrated as intersecting with seeing aspects of a race as inferior.
8. It thus intersects with racism, which is functionally the same to the initial belief being racist.

Does that make sense?
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Drunken Bard
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(Original post by Quantex)
Well, I'm a student so why shouldn't I be here?

I'm curious, do you use the N word to refer to black people or do you use more politically correct terms? While political correctness can get ridiculous at times and I realise it is in vogue to criticise it, most of those who rail against it are politically correct themselves.
Well I was being sarcastic.

And no I don't use that word, however I do hate it when people say "the N word"

As in, instead of saying the word itself they say "This guy said the N word the other day"

Language is all about context, people shouldn't be afraid of words on their own.

Of course, people should try to be pleasant to one another, but I firmly believe in free speech and I worry as to when it will go to far.
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i<3milkshake
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(Original post by L'Allegro)
The thing is, people see this as racist because of the underlying assumptions one is making.

1. Our likes and dislikes aren't just arbitrary preferences. They're formed by certain premises and beliefs.
2. Applying this to the 'culture changing' dislike, let's examine what premises might be at work.
3. People might dislike a culture changing because they feel that their culture is superior. This seems an uncontroversial point.
4. Given they must necessarily feel that their culture is superior to another, one then needs to look at whose culture they think the initial culture is superior to.
5. The culture perceived as undesirable, because inferior, is typically a foreign one.
6. The 'foreign' culture is typically a culture associated with a race.

7. Therefore, the belief in the superiority of one's culture can be demonstrated as intersecting with seeing aspects of a race as inferior.
8. It thus intersects with racism, which is functionally the same to the initial belief being racist.

Does that make sense?
In my view the UK DOES have a superior culture to many other countries. It may not be politically correct to say it but it is true. It isn't "racist" to like cultures that want equal rights for women, gays, and those who are not believers in their religion.

EDIT; I mean I take issue with how the Christian Church can at times be holding back progress in society with its hostile views toward gays and women. Taking issue with the church for these is fine, but do it for other religions and people say "racist". When it actually isn't. It is just wanting a tolerant society and not wanting those who don't also want that.
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Quady
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(Original post by i<3milkshake)
However, political correctness has now got to the point that certain people can be harmed and now not allowed to speak. Don't like waiting two weeks to see a GP? racist. Don't like seeing the culture of a place change rapidly due to high immigration? Racist.
But thats not political correctness is it?

Thats jumping to conclusions, conformation bias and being accusatory.
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Quady
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(Original post by Drunken Bard)
Well I was being sarcastic.

And no I don't use that word, however I do hate it when people say "the N word"

As in, instead of saying the word itself they say "This guy said the N word the other day"

Language is all about context, people shouldn't be afraid of words on their own.

Of course, people should try to be pleasant to one another, but I firmly believe in free speech and I worry as to when it will go to far.
So you don't think the Queen should be offended if someone uses the C word in context in conversation with her?

'This tuna sandwich smells like a c...' - thats fine?

(the politically correct swear filter will stop me from posting it)
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L'Allegro
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(Original post by i<3milkshake)
In my view the UK DOES have a superior culture to many other countries. It may not be politically correct to say it but it is true. It isn't "racist" to like cultures that want equal rights for women, gays, and those who are not believers in their religion.

EDIT; I mean I take issue with how the Christian Church can at times be holding back progress in society with its hostile views toward gays and women. Taking issue with the church for these is fine, but do it for other religions and people say "racist". When it actually isn't. It is just wanting a tolerant society and not wanting those who don't also want that.
I think you're creating an untenable dichotomy between liberal UK culture and the worst aspects of Islamic fascism, and in doing so create a straw man. Why is the UK's culture superior, by any remotely objective measure, to, say Caribbean culture, or to moderate Islamic culture, or to Eastern European culture? No, of course it's not racist to prefer the liberal aspects of UK culture to the oppressive aspects of Islamic culture, but you're surely a nuanced enough thinker to recognize that people that dislike multiculturalism are rarely having to deal with the latter.
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