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    I'm going into my first year of uni, will be studying physics. I studied the foundation year last year since I didn't study physics for A-Level. I was considering a career in teaching, if I apply for PGCE in science, do I need a physics A-Level?

    I studied Maths, Bio & Economics at A-Level.



    oops I meant *PGCE
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    Your best bet is to check uni entry requirements but I wouldn't imagine so with a foundation year in physics.
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    You will need Maths, as most PGCE Physics courses are actually called 'Physics with Maths'.
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    (Original post by returnmigrant)
    You will need Maths, as most PGCE Physics courses are actually called 'Physics with Maths'.
    Will that allow us to teach in both departments?
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    (Original post by Xlxl23)
    I'm going into my first year of uni, will be studying physics. I studied the foundation year last year since I didn't study physics for A-Level. I was considering a career in teaching, if I apply for PGCE in science, do I need a physics A-Level?

    I studied Maths, Bio & Economics at A-Level.



    oops I meant *PGCE
    It varies by university- entry requirements are often detailed on their website, if in doubt then email admissions. I've plucked out a couple of requirements as examples:

    There are two seperate PGCE courses you could do- PGCE Physics with Maths as Returnmigrant suggested- Manchester requirements:. You will require a strong academic record at A-level or equivalent: you should have at least grade B in Physics (or a C if you can demonstrate sustained academic attainment since A-level) and at least one other science or maths subject at A-level.
    Birmingham make no mention of A-Level requirements on their website.

    Alternatively you could do PGCE Secondary Science and specialise in Physics. Most science teachers teach more than one science- usually Chem & Bio or Chem & Physics. Newman university make no mention of A-Level requirements for their PGCE's
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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    It varies by university- entry requirements are often detailed on their website, if in doubt then email admissions. I've plucked out a couple of requirements as examples:

    There are two seperate PGCE courses you could do- PGCE Physics with Maths as Returnmigrant suggested- Manchester requirements:. You will require a strong academic record at A-level or equivalent: you should have at least grade B in Physics (or a C if you can demonstrate sustained academic attainment since A-level) and at least one other science or maths subject at A-level.
    Birmingham make no mention of A-Level requirements on their website.

    Alternatively you could do PGCE Secondary Science and specialise in Physics. Most science teachers teach more than one science- usually Chem & Bio or Chem & Physics. Newman university make no mention of A-Level requirements for their PGCE's
    Thank you so much. Will have to email a few universities to see if it's okay
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    (Original post by Xlxl23)
    I'm going into my first year of uni, will be studying physics. I studied the foundation year last year since I didn't study physics for A-Level. I was considering a career in teaching, if I apply for PGCE in science, do I need a physics A-Level?

    I studied Maths, Bio & Economics at A-Level.



    oops I meant *PGCE
    I've recently graduated from Newman university, I think over there they will look for a science degree. They also emphasis work experience and look at your academic qualifications. It's quite competitive, but it's a great uni. Especially for teaching. The classes are small so it's great for support and the lecturers always have an open door policy. Definitely check the website out, among others. It will tell you what they are looking for and what they can offer etc.

    Feel free to ask any more questions.

    T.
 
 
 
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