Turn on thread page Beta

Missed school, poor gcse grades, want to study medicine watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Basically i was wondering whether missing 6 weeks of school (being in the hospital) during your gcse year would be a valid for excuse for average gcse results (low for medicine applicants)
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    Low results? Your results are great for the majority of universities.

    I know this is TSR, but seriously, well done.

    Focus on your A levels and your BMAT/UKCAT and you'll be fine
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Is this a joke?
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    Those grades are an abomination! Honestly, I don't even know if Starbucks will take you, you need at least 50k UCAS points to make coffee these days.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Those are not poor GCSE grades
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AzimH)
    Is this a joke?
    I'm so scared because the rest of the people applying have at least 7A*s :/ and i was hoping missing 6 weeks was a valid excuse
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by zzFishstick)
    Those grades are an abomination! Honestly, I don't even know if Starbucks will take you, you need at least 50k UCAS points to make coffee these days.
    I once applied to McDonalds with my A* grades and they laughed at me, since the grades were so horrible and they thought I was joking. Once I told them I was being serious, they got pissed off cause they thought I was taking the mick out of them. So, they injected me with the ebola virus and burned my nipples. 100% True story.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ToeHold)
    Low results? Your results are great for the majority of universities.

    I know this is TSR, but seriously, well done.

    Focus on your A levels and your BMAT/UKCAT and you'll be fine
    thank you !!! i really hope i meet the cut off score for imperial next year
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    PS Reviewer
    (Original post by Dorae)
    I'm so scared because the rest of the people applying have at least 7A*s :/ and i was hoping missing 6 weeks was a valid excuse
    If you feel that your studies have been affected by an illness, you can get your teachers to mention this in your referee letter but your grades are very good! It should not count against you when applying to university in any case. Good luck!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by silverstardj)
    if you feel that your studies have been affected by an illness, you can get your teachers to mention this in your referee letter but your grades are very good! It should not count against you when applying to university in any case. Good luck!
    thank you sooo much. You are the best
    Offline

    18
    (Original post by Dorae)
    I'm so scared because the rest of the people applying have at least 7A*s :/ and i was hoping missing 6 weeks was a valid excuse
    Ask your school to mention it in your UCAS reference when applying. You'll need to avoid universities like Oxford, Cardiff and QUB because they're all GCSE-heavy medical schools and most people applying there will know this and, accordingly, will have 7+ A*s so you'd be below average in their applicant pools.

    (Original post by Dorae)
    thank you !!! i really hope i meet the cut off score for imperial next year
    Imperial only applies a cut-off to the three sections of the BMAT (three separate cut-offs, mind you). That's the primary difficulty in getting an interview at Imperial: if you excel in two sections but have a panic attack in the third, that's it, you're not getting an interview at Imperial. It's harsh but that's how it works.

    The rest of your application is considered holistically so as long as you get good AS results and A2 predictions (actually, not entirely sure whether this applies to you since you'll probably be doing the reformed A-levels...), they'll be able to see, looking at the mention of the lost school time in your reference, that the average GCSE performance was an anomaly and not reflective of your academic potential.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Hydeman)
    Ask your school to mention it in your UCAS reference when applying. You'll need to avoid universities like Oxford, Cardiff and QUB because they're all GCSE-heavy medical schools and most people applying there will know this and, accordingly, will have 7+ A*s so you'd be below average in their applicant pools.



    Imperial only applies a cut-off to the three sections of the BMAT (three separate cut-offs, mind you). That's the primary difficulty in getting an interview at Imperial: if you excel in two sections but have a panic attack in the third, that's it, you're not getting an interview at Imperial. It's harsh but that's how it works.

    The rest of your application is considered holistically so as long as you get good AS results and A2 predictions (actually, not entirely sure whether this applies to you since you'll probably be doing the reformed A-levels...), they'll be able to see, looking at the mention of the lost school time in your reference, that the average GCSE performance was an anomaly and not reflective of your academic potential.
    in my school we still have to do the AS exams to show universities what stage we are at and for predicted grades but i think if we continue them for A2 our AS exams won't count and our A2 exams will give the final grade
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    what a joke, doctors back in the day were studying medicine with b's and c's in Alevels
    Offline

    18
    (Original post by Dorae)
    in my school we still have to do the AS exams to show universities what stage we are at and for predicted grades but i think if we continue them for A2 our AS exams won't count and our A2 exams will give the final grade
    Ah, that's good, then. The universities still haven't released definitive policies on admissions based on the new A-levels. The trouble is that, while you'll be doing AS, some schools won't be. It's not fair to disadvantage an applicant who doesn't have an AS purely because of the school/college he or she goes too. I suspect GCSEs will become more relevant but they'll probably make it a 'we'll consider any and all information available' thing to avoid being unfair. We'll have to wait and see.

    Also, you're right about the AS not counting towards the final A-level qualification. I personally hate these reforms but that's a story for another day.

    Good luck. I hope you get in.
    Offline

    18
    (Original post by halal kebab5)
    what a joke, doctors back in the day were studying medicine with b's and c's in Alevels
    Bs and Cs were harder to get in those days than they are now. Although, I'm pretty sure you needed As and Bs (not Cs) to get into medicine even then (if one of my mum's consultant colleagues isn't lying). The grading of A-levels worked very differently then.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Hydeman)
    Bs and Cs were harder to get in those days than they are now. Although, I'm pretty sure you needed As and Bs (not Cs) to get into medicine even then (if one of my mum's consultant colleagues isn't lying). The grading of A-levels worked very differently then.
    i have plenty of friends who are in 5th year med they've told me how easy it was
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Hydeman)
    Ah, that's good, then. The universities still haven't released definitive policies on admissions based on the new A-levels. The trouble is that, while you'll be doing AS, some schools won't be. It's not fair to disadvantage an applicant who doesn't have an AS purely because of the school/college he or she goes too. I suspect GCSEs will become more relevant but they'll probably make it a 'we'll consider any and all information available' thing to avoid being unfair. We'll have to wait and see.

    Also, you're right about the AS not counting towards the final A-level qualification. I personally hate these reforms but that's a story for another day.

    Good luck. I hope you get in.
    THANK you
    Offline

    18
    (Original post by halal kebab5)
    i have plenty of friends who are in 5th year med they've told me how easy it was
    Five years ago isn't quite the 'back in the day' I had in mind. I was talking about pre-1990s but fair enough.

    Yes, the requirements were lower then but the reason they've increased and continue to increase probably has to do with the competition for medicine - they need some way to narrow down applicants and it becomes very difficult when every applicant has or is predicted to have AAA and has similar work experience, extracurriculars etc.

    So what do you do if you're an admissions team in that situation? You start asking for A*AA or A*A*A to filter more people out so your job of having to differentiate between applicants becomes easier. You also introduce an entrance test like the UKCAT or BMAT (which is a fairly recent thing - also introduced because of the competition) to further differentiate applicants. If that doesn't work, then you start discriminating based on GCSEs. It's a never-ending cycle really.

    I wouldn't be surprised if they introduced a 1 - 9 grading system like they're doing at GCSE, where an 8 is equivalent to an A* and the 9 is a 'super A*.'
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Hydeman)
    Five years ago isn't quite the 'back in the day' I had in mind. I was talking about pre-1990s but fair enough.

    Yes, the requirements were lower then but the reason they've increased and continue to increase probably has to do with the competition for medicine - they need some way to narrow down applicants and it becomes very difficult when every applicant has or is predicted to have AAA and has similar work experience, extracurriculars etc.

    So what do you do if you're an admissions team in that situation? You start asking for A*AA or A*A*A to filter more people out so your job of having to differentiate between applicants becomes easier. You also introduce an entrance test like the UKCAT or BMAT (which is a fairly recent thing - also introduced because of the competition) to further differentiate applicants. If that doesn't work, then you start discriminating based on GCSEs. It's a never-ending cycle really.

    I wouldn't be surprised if they introduced a 1 - 9 grading system like they're doing at GCSE, where an 8 is equivalent to an A* and the 9 is a 'super A*.'
    f*** the uk lool all doctors from eastern europe and asia these days may aswel branch out and study in another country
    Offline

    18
    (Original post by halal kebab5)
    f*** the uk lool all doctors from eastern europe and asia these days may aswel branch out and study in another country
    Okay? LOL, not sure what you mean.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: September 17, 2015

University open days

  1. University of Bradford
    University-wide Postgraduate
    Wed, 25 Jul '18
  2. University of Buckingham
    Psychology Taster Tutorial Undergraduate
    Wed, 25 Jul '18
  3. Bournemouth University
    Clearing Campus Visit Undergraduate
    Wed, 1 Aug '18
Poll
How are you feeling in the run-up to Results Day 2018?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.