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    Hello. I am a prospective Cambridge university applicant for engineering. Cam's website says it is a general course, where specialization occurs in the beginning of second year. However, the UCAS website, while having general engineering as an option, has many other engineering courses with the same UCAS code, such as electrical engineering, aerospace, etc. This confused me slightly, and became aware that some other unis have done the same thing. So in the end is the Cambridge engineering course a general one, or can you begin studying one of the disciplines right away?
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    (Original post by mr.dandy)
    Hello. I am a prospective Cambridge university applicant for engineering. Cam's website says it is a general course, where specialization occurs in the beginning of second year. However, the UCAS website, while having general engineering as an option, has many other engineering courses with the same UCAS code, such as electrical engineering, aerospace, etc. This confused me slightly, and became aware that some other unis have done the same thing. So in the end is the Cambridge engineering course a general one, or can you begin studying one of the disciplines right away?
    No, the course is general. As far as I'm aware, all papers are compulsory in Year 1 and most in Year 2 so the real specialisation only really starts in Year 3. I'd have thought that the different options available in UCAS are for administrative purposes or maybe they'll influence what questions you're asked at interview (I honestly don't know, hopefully an Engineer will clarify this) but it definitely doesn't oblige you to end up specialising in that area, nor will it allow you to specialise earlier.
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    (Original post by mr.dandy)
    ...So in the end is the Cambridge engineering course a general one, or can you begin studying one of the disciplines right away?
    You just apply for H100 - without stating any specialisation preference. The only difference is for Chemical Engineering where you apply via Engineering (H810) or NatSci (H813).

    Anecdotally, many (most?) students change from their originally intended specialisation during the first 2 years anyway. That's one of the benefits of the general course.

    Edit to add: you don't start to specialise at Cambridge until the 3rd term of the 2nd year. Until then everyone does the same subjects.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    You just apply for H100 - without stating any specialisation preference. The only difference is for Chemical Engineering where you apply via Engineering (H810) or NatSci (H813).

    Anecdotally, many (most?) students change from their originally intended specialisation during the first 2 years anyway. That's one of the benefits of the general course.

    Edit to add: you don't start to specialise at Cambridge until the 3rd term of the 2nd year. Until then everyone does the same subjects.
    Thank you for your response. I realise that, but the UCAS site also gives options such as 'engineering- aerospace and aerothermal' or 'engineering - electrical and electronic' all with the same code (h100). So i was wondering that choosing one of these options forces me to specialise into that specific discipline in year 2 and not allowing me to specialise in any other discipline
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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    No, the course is general. As far as I'm aware, all papers are compulsory in Year 1 and most in Year 2 so the real specialisation only really starts in Year 3. I'd have thought that the different options available in UCAS are for administrative purposes or maybe they'll influence what questions you're asked at interview (I honestly don't know, hopefully an Engineer will clarify this) but it definitely doesn't oblige you to end up specialising in that area, nor will it allow you to specialise earlier.
    Thanks for the response. That is good to hear but it still puzzles me as to why they would use the same code.
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    (Original post by mr.dandy)
    Thank you for your response. I realise that, but the UCAS site also gives options such as 'engineering- aerospace and aerothermal' or 'engineering - electrical and electronic' all with the same code (h100). So i was wondering that choosing one of these options forces me to specialise into that specific discipline in year 2 and not allowing me to specialise in any other discipline
    No - makes no difference whatsoever.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    No - makes no difference whatsoever.
    Thats good to know. Do you know as to why they would assign the same code to so many different course names? Also what is the difference between engineering h810 and h100? Thanks in advance.
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    (Original post by mr.dandy)
    Thats good to know. Do you know as to why they would assign the same code to so many different course names? Also what is the difference between engineering h810 and h100? Thanks in advance.
    Perhaps it is to do with search engines - those who want to study aerospace engineering will still pick up Cambridge's course if they search by the degree subject name.

    Does anyone know whether the name of degree that you graduate with from Cambridge reflects the specialisms taken in the final years of the course?
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    (Original post by mr.dandy)
    Thats good to know. Do you know as to why they would assign the same code to so many different course names? Also what is the difference between engineering h810 and h100? Thanks in advance.
    Putting H810 into the UCAS course search at
    http://search.ucas.com/ lists 15 chemical engineering courses, including Cambridge which says that this is the entry route via Engineering (as opposed to entry via Natural Sciences).

    There is probably no difference between H810 or H100 for the first 5 terms, but a current undergraduate might be able to say.

    - actually the course details for H810 at Cambridge are here:

    http://www.undergraduate.study.cam.a...al-engineering
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    (Original post by Holmstock)
    Perhaps it is to do with search engines - those who want to study aerospace engineering will still pick up Cambridge's course if they search by the degree subject name.

    Does anyone know whether the name of degree that you graduate with from Cambridge reflects the specialisms taken in the final years of the course?
    SEO is a good thought. It honestly makes no difference to the degree.

    Everyone graduates with a BA and an MEng. (And then an MA, that's an Oxbridge thing) The specialisation isnt stated on the degree as such. But your transcript will give details of the modules youve taken. And you qualify for the appropriate certification by the various Engineering Institutions.

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    Well that clears the confusion. Thank you all for your replies!
 
 
 

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