This discussion is closed.
Jon Griffey
Badges:
#1
Report 18 years ago
#1
I am considering crucifying myself financially by sending my children to
the local private school when they are school age.

I am looking for some feedback on this, i.e. pros and cons, any parents
who have gone down that route and either regretted it or regretted not
doing it, any teachers in the sector who have a view.

Can anyone help? Are there any useful URL's?

--
Jon Griffey
0
Shiraz
Badges:
#2
Report 18 years ago
#2
"Jon Griffey" <[email protected]> wrote
[q1]> I am looking for some feedback on this, i.e. pros and cons, any[/q1]
[q1]> parents who have gone down that route and either regretted it or[/q1]
[q1]> regretted not doing it, any teachers in the sector who have a view.[/q1]

My husband and I were both state-educated and didn't give private
education a thought at first. Our daughters attended a first school
until they were 7 & 9 years old and then, out of sheer nosiness, I
attended a prep school's open day because my neighbours children went
there. I was amazed at the difference and because we were in a position
to afford it financially, made a very quick decision to move them. (The
local middle & senior schools weren't very impressive). Fees are quite
reasonable at that stage but be prepared for the huge jump when they hit
11 or 13. You'll probably find that day schools will be considerably
cheaper than those which are a combination of day & boarding. I have
never regretted the decision but do check out your local schools first.
There are some excellent schools so don't dismiss them out of hand. What
you should get in the private sector is a lot more time devoted to your
child. For example, my daughter's English Lit A level group has 8
pupils. I'm training in the state sector and my A level lit group is
about 24. Which puts pressure on pupils and staff. Many private schools
don't use SATS but have their own internal exams. Again, less pressure
on staff & pupils. One thing to be aware of - once you're in the private
sector, your child will find it much harder to revert back to the state
system so make sure you can afford it before committing yourself.
--
~ Shiraz
0
Bob Todd
Badges:
#3
Report 18 years ago
#3
DO IT !!!!

You will never regret giving your children a good education.

We moved our daughter out of an appalling comprehensive at the end of
year 8 and into a private day school. What a difference. The pressure to
succeed was immense and so was the expectations and support of staff.
Some of her old friends at the comp ended up with a bunch of grade B and
C GCSE's most ended up with worse, she brought home a mix of an A*, A's
and B's and she was not the brightest of her group. She then moved on to
the local Grammar School Sixth Form and she is now studying Law at a
good University.

As teachers in the state sector the decision was difficult, but you must
put your family before any idealistic or political views. Do your best
for your children. When the state fails you've got to take
responsibility.

We were able to finance this by borrowing from our parents and
remortgage the house.

We are both now teaching in the private sector and enjoying our work for
the first time since the introduction of the National Curriculum and all
that paper work 10 years ago. Real teaching to small classes of well
motivated children.

Bob

Jon Griffey wrote:
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> I am considering crucifying myself financially by sending my children[/q1]
[q1]> to the local private school when they are school age.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> I am looking for some feedback on this, i.e. pros and cons, any[/q1]
[q1]> parents who have gone down that route and either regretted it or[/q1]
[q1]> regretted not doing it, any teachers in the sector who have a view.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Can anyone help? Are there any useful URL's?[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> --[/q1]
[q1]> Jon Griffey[/q1]
0
sarah84
Badges:
#4
Report 18 years ago
#4
My mother could not afford private school for me when I was younger, but she felt so strongly about the educational enviroment that I was in we moved, 6 times!!!!!
Sounds disruptive I know, but I honestly believe it was the best thing that could have happened to me.
My first school was in Camberwell (S.E. London) with large disruptive classes and unmotivated students.
My last school in UK was a Church school in Chertsey, Surrey(a big improvment) All these Schools were State run.

My mother then got a job abroad when I was 13 and I now go to a private international school. The standard is not as high as a good private school in the UK. But it is certainly better than a state school.

I believe the biggest difference between the two can be seen in the attitude of students at high school, in one its ok to want good grades and to try, in the other its uncool to bother with school work.

If I ever have children I hope I will be in a position to pay for private schooling. If I cant afford it then state education will have to surfice untill Senior school and then it will HAVE to be private.

The only problem I can foresee with the last scenario is: would a child from a state school be able to pass an entrance exam for a private school at the age of 11.

Well best of luck with deciding.

p.s. I am now 17, in my final year and have just applied to med school. THANKS MUM
0
Unregistered
Badges:
#5
Report 18 years ago
#5
i go to a private school and have since i was 4 ( im 16 now)!
i think it's great and when it comes to your childs future i think sacrificing some things for it is worth it!
0
Fay McClennan
Badges:
#6
Report 18 years ago
#6
It depends what your choices are really - I went to a very good Catholic
state school and came out with the string of As and A*s at GCSE, but my
I had changed my religion to avoid my being sent to the worst school in
the city which would have been my fate otherwise. My little brother's
just started his GCSEs at the counterpart school for boys and he's
thriving there.

I was really anti-private schools, having met a load of outspoken idiots
who were products of the system at uni - people who couldn't deal with
the novelty of meeting a real-life northerner, but then ended up working
at one for a couple of years. Now I don't really care anymore - there
are good and bad in both sectors - and I'm training in a state primary
school at the moment, and loving it, if I had kids I'd have no
hesitation in sending them there.
0
Derek McMillan
Badges:
#7
Report 18 years ago
#7
<BOAST> My sons went to a "bog standard comprehensive" and are now at
Cambridge and Warwick universities having achieved impressive A level
results</BOAST>

In West Sussex private schools have been verified to have cheated on
their exam results by including in their results successful
candidates who used their school to take the exam but did not in fact
attend the school.

On 14 Nov 2001 11:11:34 -0800, [email protected] (Fay
McClennan) wrote:

[q1]>It depends what your choices are really - I went to a very good[/q1]
[q1]>Catholic state school and came out with the string of As and A*s at[/q1]
[q1]>GCSE, but my I had changed my religion to avoid my being sent to the[/q1]
[q1]>worst school in the city which would have been my fate otherwise. My[/q1]
[q1]>little brother's just started his GCSEs at the counterpart school for[/q1]
[q1]>boys and he's thriving there.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>I was really anti-private schools, having met a load of outspoken[/q1]
[q1]>idiots who were products of the system at uni - people who couldn't[/q1]
[q1]>deal with the novelty of meeting a real-life northerner, but then ended[/q1]
[q1]>up working at one for a couple of years. Now I don't really care[/q1]
[q1]>anymore - there are good and bad in both sectors - and I'm training in[/q1]
[q1]>a state primary school at the moment, and loving it, if I had kids I'd[/q1]
[q1]>have no hesitation in sending them there.[/q1]

-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-

http://www.geocities.com/derekmcmillan1951 mirrored at
http://derekmcmillan.tripod.com You can contact me using messenger or my
email address.
0
Jon Griffey
Badges:
#8
Report 18 years ago
#8
In message <[email protected]>, Shiraz
<[email protected]> writes

[q1]>My husband and I were both state-educated and didn't give private[/q1]
[q1]>education a thought at first. Our daughters attended a first school[/q1]
[q1]>until they were 7 & 9 years old and then, out of sheer nosiness, I[/q1]
[q1]>attended a prep school's open day because my neighbours children went[/q1]
[q1]>there. I was amazed at the difference and because we were in a position[/q1]
[q1]>to afford it financially, made a very quick decision to move them. (The[/q1]
[q1]>local middle & senior schools weren't very impressive). Fees are quite[/q1]
[q1]>reasonable at that stage but be prepared for the huge jump when they[/q1]
[q1]>hit 11 or 13. You'll probably find that day schools will be[/q1]
[q1]>considerably cheaper than those which are a combination of day &[/q1]
[q1]>boarding. I have never regretted the decision but do check out your[/q1]
[q1]>local schools first. There are some excellent schools so don't dismiss[/q1]
[q1]>them out of hand.[/q1]

So how does one find out about the reputation and academic rigour of the
local private schools. Are there league tables etc reported anywhere?

--
Jon Griffey
0
Shiraz
Badges:
#9
Report 18 years ago
#9
"Jon Griffey" <[email protected]> wrote
[q1]> So how does one find out about the reputation and academic rigour of[/q1]
[q1]> the local private schools. Are there league tables etc reported[/q1]
[q1]> anywhere?[/q1]

I don't know about prep schools - league tables didn't exist when we
chose ours. I went on instinct and recommendation. As far as the next
stage went, very much on instinct and reputation - there are plenty of
league tables to go by, but as with state schools, you need to check out
the selection process to make sense of the tables.
--
~ Shiraz
0
Derek McMillan
Badges:
#10
Report 18 years ago
#10
I assume that the fact it is morally indefensible does not bother you?

On Fri, 9 Nov 2001 16:13:16 +0000, Jon Griffey
<[email protected]> wrote:

[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>I am considering crucifying myself financially by sending my children[/q1]
[q1]>to the local private school when they are school age.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>I am looking for some feedback on this, i.e. pros and cons, any parents[/q1]
[q1]>who have gone down that route and either regretted it or regretted not[/q1]
[q1]>doing it, any teachers in the sector who have a view.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>Can anyone help? Are there any useful URL's?[/q1]

----------------------------------------
http://www.geocities.com/derekmcmillan1951 You can contact me by email
or ICQ 87147116
0
Derek McMillan
Badges:
#11
Report 18 years ago
#11
As long as the middle class can opt out of the state system they will
have no interest in improving it.

On Sat, 10 Nov 2001 09:00:11 -0000, "Shiraz"
<[email protected]> wrote:

[q1]>"Jon Griffey" <[email protected]> wrote[/q1]
[q2]>> I am looking for some feedback on this, i.e. pros and cons, any[/q2]
[q2]>> parents who have gone down that route and either regretted it or[/q2]
[q2]>> regretted not doing it, any teachers in the sector who have a view.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>My husband and I were both state-educated and didn't give private[/q1]
[q1]>education a thought at first. Our daughters attended a first school[/q1]
[q1]>until they were 7 & 9 years old and then, out of sheer nosiness, I[/q1]
[q1]>attended a prep school's open day because my neighbours children went[/q1]
[q1]>there. I was amazed at the difference and because we were in a position[/q1]
[q1]>to afford it financially, made a very quick decision to move them. (The[/q1]
[q1]>local middle & senior schools weren't very impressive). Fees are quite[/q1]
[q1]>reasonable at that stage but be prepared for the huge jump when they[/q1]
[q1]>hit 11 or 13. You'll probably find that day schools will be[/q1]
[q1]>considerably cheaper than those which are a combination of day &[/q1]
[q1]>boarding. I have never regretted the decision but do check out your[/q1]
[q1]>local schools first. There are some excellent schools so don't dismiss[/q1]
[q1]>them out of hand. What you should get in the private sector is a lot[/q1]
[q1]>more time devoted to your child. For example, my daughter's English Lit[/q1]
[q1]>A level group has 8 pupils. I'm training in the state sector and my A[/q1]
[q1]>level lit group is about 24. Which puts pressure on pupils and staff.[/q1]
[q1]>Many private schools don't use SATS but have their own internal exams.[/q1]
[q1]>Again, less pressure on staff & pupils. One thing to be aware of - once[/q1]
[q1]>you're in the private sector, your child will find it much harder to[/q1]
[q1]>revert back to the state system so make sure you can afford it before[/q1]
[q1]>committing yourself.[/q1]

----------------------------------------
http://www.geocities.com/derekmcmillan1951 You can contact me by email
or ICQ 87147116
0
Derek McMillan
Badges:
#12
Report 18 years ago
#12
Private schools in West Sussex were exposed for fiddling their results
in the league tables. They did it as follows: Pupils who used the school
as a centre to take exams but were not educated at the school were
included in their figures to improve their standing. To show how much
money dominates the thinking of these people they were esposed not by
OFSTED but by the Office of Fair Trading because they are a business.

On Thu, 15 Nov 2001 17:42:38 -0000, "Shiraz"
<[email protected]> wrote:

[q1]>"Jon Griffey" <[email protected]> wrote[/q1]
[q2]>> So how does one find out about the reputation and academic rigour of[/q2]
[q2]>> the local private schools. Are there league tables etc reported[/q2]
[q2]>> anywhere?[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>I don't know about prep schools - league tables didn't exist when we[/q1]
[q1]>chose ours. I went on instinct and recommendation. As far as the next[/q1]
[q1]>stage went, very much on instinct and reputation - there are plenty of[/q1]
[q1]>league tables to go by, but as with state schools, you need to check[/q1]
[q1]>out the selection process to make sense of the tables.[/q1]

----------------------------------------
http://www.geocities.com/derekmcmillan1951 You can contact me by email
or ICQ 87147116
0
Bob Todd
Badges:
#13
Report 18 years ago
#13
It is the duty of all parents to provide the best education for their
children. The responsibility is with the parents and not the state.

Bog-standard Comprehensive schools are a result of the lack of
competition in education provision. State near monopolies always result
in inefficient provision of services eg. NHS waiting lists, Railtrack.
Since being renationalised delays attributed to Railtrack are up 40% -
what a surprise !!!

Derek McMillan wrote:
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> As long as the middle class can opt out of the state system they will[/q1]
[q1]> have no interest in improving it.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> On Sat, 10 Nov 2001 09:00:11 -0000, "Shiraz"[/q1]
[q1]> <[email protected]> wrote:[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]> >"Jon Griffey" <[email protected]> wrote[/q2]
[q2]> >> I am looking for some feedback on this, i.e. pros and cons, any[/q2]
[q2]> >> parents who have gone down that route and either regretted it or[/q2]
[q2]> >> regretted not doing it, any teachers in the sector who have a view.[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> >My husband and I were both state-educated and didn't give private[/q2]
[q2]> >education a thought at first. Our daughters attended a first school[/q2]
[q2]> >until they were 7 & 9 years old and then, out of sheer nosiness, I[/q2]
[q2]> >attended a prep school's open day because my neighbours children went[/q2]
[q2]> >there. I was amazed at the difference and because we were in a[/q2]
[q2]> >position to afford it financially, made a very quick decision to move[/q2]
[q2]> >them. (The local middle & senior schools weren't very impressive).[/q2]
[q2]> >Fees are quite reasonable at that stage but be prepared for the huge[/q2]
[q2]> >jump when they hit 11 or 13. You'll probably find that day schools[/q2]
[q2]> >will be considerably cheaper than those which are a combination of[/q2]
[q2]> >day & boarding. I have never regretted the decision but do check out[/q2]
[q2]> >your local schools first. There are some excellent schools so don't[/q2]
[q2]> >dismiss them out of hand. What you should get in the private sector[/q2]
[q2]> >is a lot more time devoted to your child. For example, my daughter's[/q2]
[q2]> >English Lit A level group has 8 pupils. I'm training in the state[/q2]
[q2]> >sector and my A level lit group is about 24. Which puts pressure on[/q2]
[q2]> >pupils and staff. Many private schools don't use SATS but have their[/q2]
[q2]> >own internal exams. Again, less pressure on staff & pupils. One thing[/q2]
[q2]> >to be aware of - once you're in the private sector, your child will[/q2]
[q2]> >find it much harder to revert back to the state system so make sure[/q2]
[q2]> >you can afford it before committing yourself.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> ----------------------------------------[/q1]
[q1]> http://www.geocities.com/derekmcmillan1951 You can contact me by email[/q1]
[q1]> or ICQ 87147116[/q1]
0
Derek McMillan
Badges:
#14
Report 18 years ago
#14
Why not blame all these unemployed people for not sending their
children to Eton.

btw Railtrack has not been renationalised...don't you read the papers.

On Thu, 13 Dec 2001 19:30:17 +0000, Bob Todd
<[email protected]> wrote:

[q1]>It is the duty of all parents to provide the best education for their[/q1]
[q1]>children. The responsibility is with the parents and not the state.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>Bog-standard Comprehensive schools are a result of the lack of[/q1]
[q1]>competition in education provision. State near monopolies always result[/q1]
[q1]>in inefficient provision of services eg. NHS waiting lists, Railtrack.[/q1]
[q1]>Since being renationalised delays attributed to Railtrack are up 40% -[/q1]
[q1]>what a surprise !!![/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>Derek McMillan wrote:[/q1]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> As long as the middle class can opt out of the state system they will[/q2]
[q2]>> have no interest in improving it.[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> On Sat, 10 Nov 2001 09:00:11 -0000, "Shiraz"[/q2]
[q2]>> <[email protected]> wrote:[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> >"Jon Griffey" <[email protected]> wrote[/q2]
[q2]>> >> I am looking for some feedback on this, i.e. pros and cons, any[/q2]
[q2]>> >> parents who have gone down that route and either regretted it or[/q2]
[q2]>> >> regretted not doing it, any teachers in the sector who have a[/q2]
[q2]>> >> view.[/q2]
[q2]>> >[/q2]
[q2]>> >My husband and I were both state-educated and didn't give private[/q2]
[q2]>> >education a thought at first. Our daughters attended a first school[/q2]
[q2]>> >until they were 7 & 9 years old and then, out of sheer nosiness, I[/q2]
[q2]>> >attended a prep school's open day because my neighbours children[/q2]
[q2]>> >went there. I was amazed at the difference and because we were in a[/q2]
[q2]>> >position to afford it financially, made a very quick decision to[/q2]
[q2]>> >move them. (The local middle & senior schools weren't very[/q2]
[q2]>> >impressive). Fees are quite reasonable at that stage but be prepared[/q2]
[q2]>> >for the huge jump when they hit 11 or 13. You'll probably find that[/q2]
[q2]>> >day schools will be considerably cheaper than those which are a[/q2]
[q2]>> >combination of day & boarding. I have never regretted the decision[/q2]
[q2]>> >but do check out your local schools first. There are some excellent[/q2]
[q2]>> >schools so don't dismiss them out of hand. What you should get in[/q2]
[q2]>> >the private sector is a lot more time devoted to your child. For[/q2]
[q2]>> >example, my daughter's English Lit A level group has 8 pupils. I'm[/q2]
[q2]>> >training in the state sector and my A level lit group is about 24.[/q2]
[q2]>> >Which puts pressure on pupils and staff. Many private schools don't[/q2]
[q2]>> >use SATS but have their own internal exams. Again, less pressure on[/q2]
[q2]>> >staff & pupils. One thing to be aware of - once you're in the[/q2]
[q2]>> >private sector, your child will find it much harder to revert back[/q2]
[q2]>> >to the state system so make sure you can afford it before committing[/q2]
[q2]>> >yourself.[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> ----------------------------------------[/q2]
[q2]>> http://www.geocities.com/derekmcmillan1951 You can contact me by[/q2]
[q2]>> email or ICQ 87147116[/q2]

----------------------------------------
http://www.geocities.com/derekmcmillan1951 You can contact me by email
or ICQ 87147116
0
Derek McMillan
Badges:
#15
Report 18 years ago
#15
Either Bob Todd is saying that poor people (for example the unemployed)
are not parents or that they ought to send their children to Eton. If it
is not the responsibility of the state to educate their children then
what is to become of them?

Oh and the joke about "switch your brain cell on" - I am a teacher I
have been insulted by experts. Most of my bottom set year 11's are more
subtle than Bob.

On Thu, 13 Dec 2001 19:30:17 +0000, Bob Todd
<[email protected]> wrote:

[q1]>It is the duty of all parents to provide the best education for their[/q1]
[q1]>children. The responsibility is with the parents and not the state.[/q1]

----------------------------------------
http://www.geocities.com/derekmcmillan1951 You can contact me by email
or ICQ 87147116
0
Bob Todd
Badges:
#16
Report 18 years ago
#16
Derek McMillan wrote:
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Why not blame all these unemployed people for not sending their[/q1]
[q1]> children to Eton.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> btw Railtrack has not been renationalised...don't you read the papers.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]

Ownership and control are now in the hands of the Government. Thats
renationalisation.

Who wrote anything about the unemployed? Switch your brain cell on.
0
Bob Todd
Badges:
#17
Report 18 years ago
#17
Derek McMillan wrote:
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Either Bob Todd is saying that poor people (for example the[/q1]
[q1]> unemployed) are not parents or that they ought to send their children[/q1]
[q1]> to Eton. If it is not the responsibility of the state to educate their[/q1]
[q1]> children then what is to become of them?[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]

Children are the responsibility of their parents and its the parents
responsibility to educate them to the best of their and their
children's ability.
0
Victoria Crane
Badges:
#18
Report 18 years ago
#18
WOW - "the pressure to succeed was immense"

I'd have not thanked my parents for sending me to such an institution.

Thank goodness they did not. I worked as hard as I wanted to, got some
decent GCSEs and am now working towards a PhD at a "good" university
(whatever that means)

Being forced/dragged through the system with the pressure of it costing
your parents lots of money is not, in my opinion, a good recipe for
success for all young people.

"Bob Todd" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...

[q1]> DO IT !!!![/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> You will never regret giving your children a good education.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> We moved our daughter out of an appalling comprehensive at the end[/q1]
[q1]> of year 8 and into a private day school. What a difference. The[/q1]
[q1]> pressure to succeed was immense and so was the expectations and[/q1]
[q1]> support of staff.[/q1]

--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG
0
Bob Todd
Badges:
#19
Report 18 years ago
#19
Victoria Crane wrote:
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> WOW - "the pressure to succeed was immense"[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> I'd have not thanked my parents for sending me to such an institution.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Thank goodness they did not. I worked as hard as I wanted to, got some[/q1]
[q1]> decent GCSEs and am now working towards a PhD at a "good" university[/q1]
[q1]> (whatever that means)[/q1]

"Whatever that means". You don't know !!!!????

I take it that you chose the University you attend because it was
"good" at the subject you study, or maybe it was the only one that
would accept you.
0
Derek McMillan
Badges:
#20
Report 18 years ago
#20
I see Bob hasn't worked out his punctuation problem yet. "!!!!????" is
the sort of thing Year sevens usually grow out of.

And I wouldn't worry about Bob resorting to personal abuse when he can't
argue - you have to make allowances...private schools teach snobbery
with violence better than anything else.

On Wed, 09 Jan 2002 19:41:30 +0000, Bob Todd
<[email protected]> wrote:

[q1]>"Whatever that means". You don't know !!!!????[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>I take it that you chose the University you attend because it was[/q1]
[q1]>"good" at the subject you study, or maybe it was the only one that[/q1]
[q1]>would accept you.[/q1]

----------------------------------------
http://www.geocities.com/derekmcmillan1951 You can contact me by email
or ICQ 87147116
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No, it's helped improve my relationships (64)
18.6%

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