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Can you become a Paramedic with an assault caution?

Okay I have to say last month I was interviewed by the police and i was cautioned for assault against a work colleague, it was totally out of my nature i'm afraid but i fear the repruccusions it will have if I want to become a paramedic, my dream job, I have this week to decide my final a levels, and I want to become a paramedic, but I'm scared what if they don't allow me in cause of my assault caution at 16, when I was naive and certain circumstances lead to it???

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I imagine you can. Assault is not that serious itself, nevermind an assault caution... I assume you mean common assault?
Original post by Shirin1
Okay I have to say last month I was interviewed by the police and i was cautioned for assault against a work colleague, it was totally out of my nature i'm afraid but i fear the repruccusions it will have if I want to become a paramedic, my dream job, I have this week to decide my final a levels, and I want to become a paramedic, but I'm scared what if they don't allow me in cause of my assault caution at 16, when I was naive and certain circumstances lead to it???


Hey

I used to work in Recruitment for a leading ambulance service.

As long as you have no other issues on your DBS by the time you come to apply for an actual paramedic post, you should be ok. But they will ask for disclosure at interview, you will need to complete a risk form and your form will be assessed in some way - at my Trust this was by a compliance panel.

Usually small cautions like that when you are young are considered ok as long as it wasn't too recent but anything like drink driving will be an automatic no.
Reply 3
Original post by infairverona
Hey

I used to work in Recruitment for a leading ambulance service.

As long as you have no other issues on your DBS by the time you come to apply for an actual paramedic post, you should be ok. But they will ask for disclosure at interview, you will need to complete a risk form and your form will be assessed in some way - at my Trust this was by a compliance panel.

Usually small cautions like that when you are young are considered ok as long as it wasn't too recent but anything like drink driving will be an automatic no.

Thank you, so do you think this assault one might hurt my chances? It was a one time idiotic mistake I am in total regret of the choice and my actions
Original post by Shirin1
Thank you, so do you think this assault one might hurt my chances? It was a one time idiotic mistake I am in total regret of the choice and my actions


No I shouldn't think so to be honest. You must be around 18, if you're starting a Paramedic Science degree this year you'll be two years in or even in your third year by the time you start applying for posts.

By then your caution might actually not show up on your DBS - it will be an enhanced DBS with adult and children barring but I can't remember if cautions disappear after a certain period of time. Either way I would suggest you disclose it as interview as it's so minor. As long as you don't have anything else come up by the time you apply for posts you should be fine.

You can apply at the beginning of your third year but I would suggest you wait until the spring of your third year just to give a bit more distance from the offence, paramedic vacancies are hard to fill and the adverts are rolling so you will always have a post to apply for
Reply 5
Original post by infairverona
No I shouldn't think so to be honest. You must be around 18, if you're starting a Paramedic Science degree this year you'll be two years in or even in your third year by the time you start applying for posts.

By then your caution might actually not show up on your DBS - it will be an enhanced DBS with adult and children barring but I can't remember if cautions disappear after a certain period of time. Either way I would suggest you disclose it as interview as it's so minor. As long as you don't have anything else come up by the time you apply for posts you should be fine.

You can apply at the beginning of your third year but I would suggest you wait until the spring of your third year just to give a bit more distance from the offence, paramedic vacancies are hard to fill and the adverts are rolling so you will always have a post to apply for

I'm actually 16 but thank you very much for the advice, i'm just scared about this ruining my chance and me wasting my 5 years of my life studying the wrong course
Original post by Shirin1
I'm actually 16 but thank you very much for the advice, i'm just scared about this ruining my chance and me wasting my 5 years of my life studying the wrong course


Oh sorry must've misread! No don't worry about it at all then. I can't speak for university requirements because I can't remember off the top of my head if they check a DBS before you start for paramedic science (it's a bit different to other courses) but if you get a place you won't need to worry, by the time you apply it will be fine. Just stay out of trouble until then!
Reply 7
Original post by infairverona
Oh sorry must've misread! No don't worry about it at all then. I can't speak for university requirements because I can't remember off the top of my head if they check a DBS before you start for paramedic science (it's a bit different to other courses) but if you get a place you won't need to worry, by the time you apply it will be fine. Just stay out of trouble until then!


thanks so much!!
I had a caution from when I was 12 and I'm 20 now basically they told me at the time it would be erased after 3 years.. but its been showing up every time I have a dbs check.. Its not really a problem but I'm kind of getting tired of explaining what happened

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Original post by WirelessBrain123
I had a caution from when I was 12 and I'm 20 now basically they told me at the time it would be erased after 3 years.. but its been showing up every time I have a dbs check.. Its not really a problem but I'm kind of getting tired of explaining what happened

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It shows up on an enhanced DBS but it shouldn't show up on a standard one IIRC
Reply 10
Original post by infairverona
It shows up on an enhanced DBS but it shouldn't show up on a standard one IIRC


btw is hard to become a paramedic, dad said it is
Original post by Shirin1
btw is hard to become a paramedic, dad said it is


Once you get a place on the degree course, it's not hard at all. As in, getting an actual paramedic job when you're qualified is easy - there is a nationwide shortage of paramedics and we had to recruit at least 200 a year! We were getting them from Poland and Hungary because we just don't have enough here. There's quite a few ambulance Trusts as well, I don't know where you're based though. So the graduates are basically fought for, like down south there is South Central, South East Coast and London Ambulance and they all go to unis in other areas to try and poach graduates. London are going to Australia soon to get paramedics!

I don't think the grades are too high for paramedic science courses either, I think it's 3 Bs or maybe BBC depending on where you go. It doesn't matter which uni you go to at all because you get registered with the HCPC which means you can work as a paramedic, they honestly don't care which uni you went to so just pick one that you like. Uni prestige means nothing for paramedics
Reply 12
Original post by infairverona
Once you get a place on the degree course, it's not hard at all. As in, getting an actual paramedic job when you're qualified is easy - there is a nationwide shortage of paramedics and we had to recruit at least 200 a year! We were getting them from Poland and Hungary because we just don't have enough here. There's quite a few ambulance Trusts as well, I don't know where you're based though. So the graduates are basically fought for, like down south there is South Central, South East Coast and London Ambulance and they all go to unis in other areas to try and poach graduates. London are going to Australia soon to get paramedics!

I don't think the grades are too high for paramedic science courses either, I think it's 3 Bs or maybe BBC depending on where you go. It doesn't matter which uni you go to at all because you get registered with the HCPC which means you can work as a paramedic, they honestly don't care which uni you went to so just pick one that you like. Uni prestige means nothing for paramedics


thank you so much!! massive help and confidence boost!!
Original post by Shirin1
Okay I have to say last month I was interviewed by the police and i was cautioned for assault against a work colleague, it was totally out of my nature i'm afraid but i fear the repruccusions it will have if I want to become a paramedic, my dream job, I have this week to decide my final a levels, and I want to become a paramedic, but I'm scared what if they don't allow me in cause of my assault caution at 16, when I was naive and certain circumstances lead to it???


You'll be doing an enhanced DBS check I should think, so it probably will show up, but this won't be an issue so long as you disclose it where necessary. If it comes up on the DBS without you having said anything to the university, then it'll be a shock to them, and that will look bad on your part.

I've known student nurses with drug previous, but as they've disclosed it and shown it's in their past, they've been allowed on the course :smile:
Reply 14
Original post by PaediatricStN
You'll be doing an enhanced DBS check I should think, so it probably will show up, but this won't be an issue so long as you disclose it where necessary. If it comes up on the DBS without you having said anything to the university, then it'll be a shock to them, and that will look bad on your part.

I've known student nurses with drug previous, but as they've disclosed it and shown it's in their past, they've been allowed on the course :smile:

thank you, but bro i've been in a lot of fights aswell in school, i guess it's time to make up for it by doing volunteering work
Original post by Shirin1
thank you, but bro i've been in a lot of fights aswell in school, i guess it's time to make up for it by doing volunteering work


Ok, that's not a problem either though :smile:

If you're concerned in any way by how well you can manage your anger and response to certain situations, then I'd strongly, yet politely suggest to get that under control (Whether that's by yourself, or with help from another agency) before entering into any of the health services. As a paramedic you will most definitely encounter situations that put you under pressure/make you cross (E.g. Someone calling you for a minor problem like a headache - it happens) and you need to be able to deal with these professionally.
Reply 16
Original post by PaediatricStN
Ok, that's not a problem either though :smile:

If you're concerned in any way by how well you can manage your anger and response to certain situations, then I'd strongly, yet politely suggest to get that under control (Whether that's by yourself, or with help from another agency) before entering into any of the health services. As a paramedic you will most definitely encounter situations that put you under pressure/make you cross (E.g. Someone calling you for a minor problem like a headache - it happens) and you need to be able to deal with these professionally.

thank you paediatricStN so how did you learn to deal with these?
Original post by Shirin1
thank you paediatricStN so how did you learn to deal with these?


I'm a children's nurse, so I'm in a slightly different position to a Paramedic.

Being honest, there's a small element of acting that goes on. Things in practice rarely frustrate me, but even if inside I'm getting frustrated, on the outside I smile and I remain kind and compassionate.

You also have to remember that at the time of accessing healthcare services many people are very stressed, and therefore they act differently under that duress than they would if you just met them on a normal day in the street - I think we'd all act different if a loved one of ours was unwell. If you think about it like that, then you learn to make allowances for a lot of difficult behaviour encountered, purely down to the situation that patient or relative is in.

Your body language is key also. Keep calm, open body language. If you start throwing your arms around, that raises the tension of the situation unnecessarily. We are also taught to back away towards the exit of wherever we are, if we feel threatened at all.

Also, take every interaction with people as a fresh start - forget what they said to you ten minutes ago, and start anew. And when you pass on information about the patient and/or relative to another healthcare professional, keep it objective and professional. I.e. no comments such as "This patient is a real pain. They won't stop complaining about this blah blah blah" as that instantly prejudices the care they receive from someone else. Ignore comments like this from anyone else you hear. By giving a patient a chance, they might respond to you differently.

Your degree will also teach you ways of managing difficult situations like what we're referring to as well. Much of it comes down to experience too :smile:
You would have to do an enhanced DBS to get into uni. Declare it and you should be ok if it's the only thing. Paramedic courses are extremely difficult to get onto so don't be surprised if you don't get in first year.


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Original post by Happy_Holidays
You would have to do an enhanced DBS to get into uni. Declare it and you should be ok if it's the only thing. Paramedic courses are extremely difficult to get onto so don't be surprised if you don't get in first year.


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Nice bit of encouragement there!

All the healthcare courses are competitive, however if applicants do their best to gain relevant experience and provide a unique and well written application then they stand every chance.

Students should always be encouraged to do their best and go for it, if it's really want they want to do, but equally they should have a plan b also :smile:

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