What is the hardest mathematical concept you've learned when studying engineering?

Watch
Alpexx99
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#1
Hi guys.

I'm currently studying for my A levels and am interested in pursuing an degree in engineering at university. I was just wondering how hard the maths can be.

I am studying Biology, Chemistry and Maths at A2 level having recieved 3 A's at AS level (also doing welsh baccalaureate).

After doing some research and coming across the idea of differential equations I've become worried that an engineering degree will be too hard for me.
Can anyone with experience explain how they are finding the maths in their degree and whether I'll be able to cope?

Thanks.
0
reply
TeeEm
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#2
Report 5 years ago
#2
(Original post by Alpexx99)
Hi guys.

I'm currently studying for my A levels and am interested in pursuing an degree in engineering at university. I was just wondering how hard the maths can be.

I am studying Biology, Chemistry and Maths at A2 level having recieved 3 A's at AS level (also doing welsh baccalaureate).

After doing some research and coming across the idea of differential equations I've become worried that an engineering degree will be too hard for me.
Can anyone with experience explain how they are finding the maths in their degree and whether I'll be able to cope?

Thanks.
strong advice to self teach Further Maths FP1-FP2-FP3 and mechanics at least to M3
0
reply
Alpexx99
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#3
(Original post by TeeEm)
strong advice to self teach Further Maths FP1-FP2-FP3 and mechanics at least to M3
Thanks for the advice. Does the maths really get that difficult and do the lecturers focus much on explaining the concepts or will I have to teach myself?
0
reply
TeeEm
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#4
Report 5 years ago
#4
(Original post by Alpexx99)
Thanks for the advice. Does the maths really get that difficult and do the lecturers focus much on explaining the concepts or will I have to teach myself?
It will be in a top Uni without further Maths
0
reply
Alpexx99
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#5
(Original post by TeeEm)
It will be in a top Uni without further Maths
Thanks for the advice
0
reply
TeeEm
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#6
Report 5 years ago
#6
(Original post by Alpexx99)
Thanks for the advice
my pleasure
0
reply
alexschmalex
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#7
Report 5 years ago
#7
Only just finished 2nd year but for me so far it's been Fourier Series/Transforms but then again when I look back at it, it actually isn't that bad. Integration and differential equations can be a pain but once you learn all the methods and keep practicing, it becomes second nature! I didn't really do any special types of math in high school and I've gotten by, if you actually just pay attention in class and do the work you'll do great
0
reply
Alpexx99
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#8
(Original post by alexschmalex)
Only just finished 2nd year but for me so far it's been Fourier Series/Transforms but then again when I look back at it, it actually isn't that bad. Integration and differential equations can be a pain but once you learn all the methods and keep practicing, it becomes second nature! I didn't really do any special types of math in high school and I've gotten by, if you actually just pay attention in class and do the work you'll do great
I just took a look at the Fourier series and it does look difficult. Can I ask how the maths is taught to you and how much you study every day?
0
reply
Smack
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#9
Report 5 years ago
#9
(Original post by Alpexx99)
Hi guys.

I'm currently studying for my A levels and am interested in pursuing an degree in engineering at university. I was just wondering how hard the maths can be.

I am studying Biology, Chemistry and Maths at A2 level having recieved 3 A's at AS level (also doing welsh baccalaureate).

After doing some research and coming across the idea of differential equations I've become worried that an engineering degree will be too hard for me.
Can anyone with experience explain how they are finding the maths in their degree and whether I'll be able to cope?

Thanks.
It's an engineering degree, not a maths degree. As long as you have A-level maths or equivalent (I did highers), your maths knowledge will be sufficient to begin the course - if you can get an A grade in A-level maths, don't panic. Anything above A-level maths (or equivalent) will be a bonus, providing you with an easier ride in the first couple of maths modules where what I imagine is the syllabus of A-level further maths is covered.

The maths itself isn't that difficult, to be honest. You cover things like differential equations (which I did find quite difficult the first time round), Fourier series, Laplace transforms, matrices, and more, but you don't cover them to nearly the same depth or rigour as an actual maths student; it's more about learning methods to solve fairly standard sets of equations that come up.
0
reply
alexschmalex
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#10
Report 5 years ago
#10
(Original post by Alpexx99)
I just took a look at the Fourier series and it does look difficult. Can I ask how the maths is taught to you and how much you study every day?
We just had normal lectures and then a bunch of tutorial sessions, that is for the first two years at least. Looking at my 3rd year schedule (I'm doing another math module), there's almost no tutorial sessions. Not gonna lie I didn't put much effort into it so I didn't do well but it really does vary from person to person. For me personally, if I go over stuff I just learned in a lecture that day and the return to it the next day or so, it sticks. Tutorials also really help if you're prepared!
0
reply
Alpexx99
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#11
(Original post by Smack)
It's an engineering degree, not a maths degree. As long as you have A-level maths or equivalent (I did highers), your maths knowledge will be sufficient to begin the course - if you can get an A grade in A-level maths, don't panic. Anything above A-level maths (or equivalent) will be a bonus, providing you with an easier ride in the first couple of maths modules where what I imagine is the syllabus of A-level further maths is covered.

The maths itself isn't that difficult, to be honest. You cover things like differential equations (which I did find quite difficult the first time round), Fourier series, Laplace transforms, matrices, and more, but you don't cover them to nearly the same depth or rigour as an actual maths student; it's more about learning methods to solve fairly standard sets of equations that come up.
Do you think that my lack of experience with physics will make it more difficult and do lecturers spend a lot of time making sure you understand the equations or do they expect you to go away and self learn most of it?
0
reply
Smack
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#12
Report 5 years ago
#12
(Original post by Alpexx99)
Do you think that my lack of experience with physics will make it more difficult
Possibly. I don't know what the syllabus of A-level physics is, so it's hard to say.

and do lecturers spend a lot of time making sure you understand the equations or do they expect you to go away and self learn most of it?
Depends on the university.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Should there be a new university admissions system that ditches predicted grades?

No, I think predicted grades should still be used to make offers (516)
33.68%
Yes, I like the idea of applying to uni after I received my grades (PQA) (634)
41.38%
Yes, I like the idea of receiving offers only after I receive my grades (PQO) (312)
20.37%
I think there is a better option than the ones suggested (let us know in the thread!) (70)
4.57%

Watched Threads

View All