mr.dandy
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Hello.

I am currently an A2 student, who is interested in studying engineering. However, i have am not entirely sure which discipline to study, so i was attracted to the general engineering course that some unis offer, which allow specialising later in the years.That is the problem, however: not many unis do offer general engineering (H100 UCAS code i believe), and quite a few of the best engineering UK unis only offer specialised degrees from the start (e.g. Imperial). I have also heard that job prospects are better for someone who did a specialised course. So my question is whether i should pursue general engineering, or a specific discipline of engineering for a uni course or a mix of unis thaat offer one or the other?

My general engineering unis: cambridge, warwick, edinburgh, lancaster, durham
My mixed choices: cambridge, imperial, edinburgh,, glasgow, (to be added later)

The discipline i would choose if I had to would possibly be electrical and electronics engineering, but again, i am not entirely sure. Please help! Thanks! (sorry for the length )
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Muttley79
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(Original post by mr.dandy)
Hello.

I am currently an A2 student, who is interested in studying engineering. However, i have am not entirely sure which discipline to study, so i was attracted to the general engineering course that some unis offer, which allow specialising later in the years.That is the problem, however: not many unis do offer general engineering (H100 UCAS code i believe), and quite a few of the best engineering UK unis only offer specialised degrees from the start (e.g. Imperial). I have also heard that job prospects are better for someone who did a specialised course. So my question is whether i should pursue general engineering, or a specific discipline of engineering for a uni course or a mix of unis thaat offer one or the other?

My general engineering unis: cambridge, warwick, edinburgh, lancaster, durham
My mixed choices: cambridge, imperial, edinburgh,, glasgow, (to be added later)

The discipline i would choose if I had to would possibly be electrical and electronics engineering, but again, i am not entirely sure. Please help! Thanks! (sorry for the length )
Why no unis offering a year in Industry? Many of my top students steer away from RG unis for engineering as their courses are not as industry focused.
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Smack
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(Original post by mr.dandy)
Hello.

I am currently an A2 student, who is interested in studying engineering. However, i have am not entirely sure which discipline to study, so i was attracted to the general engineering course that some unis offer, which allow specialising later in the years.That is the problem, however: not many unis do offer general engineering (H100 UCAS code i believe), and quite a few of the best engineering UK unis only offer specialised degrees from the start (e.g. Imperial). I have also heard that job prospects are better for someone who did a specialised course. So my question is whether i should pursue general engineering, or a specific discipline of engineering for a uni course or a mix of unis thaat offer one or the other?

My general engineering unis: cambridge, warwick, edinburgh, lancaster, durham
My mixed choices: cambridge, imperial, edinburgh,, glasgow, (to be added later)

The discipline i would choose if I had to would possibly be electrical and electronics engineering, but again, i am not entirely sure. Please help! Thanks! (sorry for the length )
It doesn't matter, as you still graduate in a specific discipline even if you start off doing a general course, and many "specialist" courses are fairly general anyway (for example, I a "specialist" mechanical degree, but was still doing electrical modules into my 3rd year).
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mr.dandy
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(Original post by Muttley79)
Why no unis offering a year in Industry? Many of my top students steer away from RG unis for engineering as their courses are not as industry focused.
Thanks for the prompt reply! To tell you the truth, my uni list does go through changes often. I have seen some unis offering a year in industry. How helpful would you say it is after graduating (eg job prospects, etc)? And how is it organised, if you have any knowledge about that, and do the unis organise/help you finding work experience for the year? Thanks you in advance!
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mr.dandy
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(Original post by Smack)
It doesn't matter, as you still graduate in a specific discipline even if you start off doing a general course, and many "specialist" courses are fairly general anyway (for example, I a "specialist" mechanical degree, but was still doing electrical modules into my 3rd year).
Thanks for the quick reply! That's very helpful to hear. However, I am asking about specialist courses is because some excellent UK unis for engineering do not have the general engineeering course. And i have heard that if you end up not liking the engineering field you chose to study, it is a difficult and tedious process to switch the course. Also, may I ask please about how you chose your engineering discipline to study, and at which uni you are studying, Thanks in advance!
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Muttley79
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(Original post by mr.dandy)
Thanks for the prompt reply! To tell you the truth, my uni list does go through changes often. I have seen some unis offering a year in industry. How helpful would you say it is after graduating (eg job prospects, etc)? And how is it organised, if you have any knowledge about that, and do the unis organise/help you finding work experience for the year? Thanks you in advance!
I think it helps massively in getting a job - placement firms often offer jobs to good students!

You get some help finding a placement but the onus is on you - there are websites that advertise the placements and you'll be told about those and helped with CV etc. Good first year grades are important as you'll be applying at the start of Year 2 ...
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mr.dandy
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(Original post by Muttley79)
I think it helps massively in getting a job - placement firms often offer jobs to good students!

You get some help finding a placement but the onus is on you - there are websites that advertise the placements and you'll be told about those and helped with CV etc. Good first year grades are important as you'll be applying at the start of Year 2 ...
OK, that is very helpful info indeed! However, can't I do work experience in the summer for those unis that do not offer an industry year? Also, what would you say are great unis for engineering and offer a sandwich/industry year? Also, I believe that general engineering courses do not offer sandwich years. Is this true? Thank you very much!
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Smack
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(Original post by mr.dandy)
And i have heard that if you end up not liking the engineering field you chose to study, it is a difficult and tedious process to switch the course.
You're right.

Also, may I ask please about how you chose your engineering discipline to study, and at which uni you are studying, Thanks in advance!
Can't remember exactly how I chose mechanical. I think it was because I didn't like circuits that much, had no intention of designing buildings or bridges, and hadn't heard of chemical (didn't study any chemistry either), so that left only mechanical. I was remarkably nonchalant about the whole thing, especially compared to so many people on this site.

I studied at RGU in Aberdeen, graduated a few years ago and now working.
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Muttley79
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(Original post by mr.dandy)
OK, that is very helpful info indeed! However, can't I do work experience in the summer for those unis that do not offer an industry year? Also, what would you say are great unis for engineering and offer a sandwich/industry year? Also, I believe that general engineering courses do not offer sandwich years. Is this true? Thank you very much!
Summer placements aren't that easy to get and it depends where you live. For a plcement year you can go anywhere and get a flat/room; much harder to do that for a couple of months.

It depends where you see yourself working after your degree - some look at Loughborough, Bath or, if they want F1, Brookes. These also offer Formula Student teams to work in ...

Just look wider then the RG group to make sure you've made a wise choice.
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L'Evil Fish
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Bath? Bristol? Sheffield? Loughborough?

I think an industrial year would be good if offered. Have 2 in your mix I think.
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duscha
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I think Sheffield do a general engineering degree with a year in industry - maybe check that out?
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mr.dandy
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Thank you to all for your helpful replies. I will look into the other unis that were mentioned. One of my choices has changed: I am applying for electronic and electrical engineeeing Meng at Manchester with a year in industry.
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