SteelManatee
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#1
Which one is better to do for:
1) Jobs in London
2)Unis in London
3) Salary
0
reply
High Stakes
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 years ago
#2
Engineering.
0
reply
AGalletly
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#3
Report 4 years ago
#3
Engineering
0
reply
hoping4Astars
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#4
Report 4 years ago
#4
1) Economics, although engineering jobs are available and an engineering degree is still allowed for economics related jobs like investment banking and accounting, which are mainly located in the financial districts of London (City and Canary Wharf)
2) probably economics since lse and ucl both are highly regarded for economics but imperial is highly regarded for engineering and is one of the best in the world for engineering.
3) economics leads to a wide variety of careers, as does engineering. A lot of the jobs that you can get with an economics degree are also available with an engineering degree, such as investment banking, which has very high salaries and extremely long hours and high competition.

Overall, both degree subjects would be good for the 3 criteria you specified.
1
reply
High Stakes
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#5
Report 4 years ago
#5
(Original post by hoping4Astars)
1) Economics, although engineering jobs are available and an engineering degree is still allowed for economics related jobs like investment banking and accounting, which are mainly located in the financial districts of London (City and Canary Wharf)
2) probably economics since lse and ucl both are highly regarded for economics but imperial is highly regarded for engineering and is one of the best in the world for engineering.
3) economics leads to a wide variety of careers, as does engineering. A lot of the jobs that you can get with an economics degree are also available with an engineering degree, such as investment banking, which has very high salaries and extremely long hours and high competition.

Overall, both degree subjects would be good for the 3 criteria you specified.
Exactly. But a lot of the careers that come with an Engineering degree, can't come with an Economics degree. The only case where it's the opposite is if OP is thinking of working as an 'economist' in which case Economics is obviously the best degree.
0
reply
SteelManatee
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#6
(Original post by High Stakes)
Exactly. But a lot of the careers that come with an Engineering degree, can't come with an Economics degree. The only case where it's the opposite is if OP is thinking of working as an 'economist' in which case Economics is obviously the best degree.
Well I wanted to go into finance, so I thought doing an Economics degree with lots of finance modules would set me up properly for that. I also had the impression that someone with an Economics degree could rise up the ranks in a bank faster than someone who had an Engineering degree because the one with the Econ degree would have more knowledge for the advanved roles. Am i correct in saying that?
0
reply
jislam
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#7
Report 4 years ago
#7
Honestly It should be the subject you most enjoy. Do some reading about the subject and jobs that may interest you. For example do you want to do a 3+ year degree in engineering just because of a salary you may get or do economics which you enjoy and can get you places because of how much you love it?
2
reply
SteelManatee
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#8
(Original post by hoping4Astars)
1) Economics, although engineering jobs are available and an engineering degree is still allowed for economics related jobs like investment banking and accounting, which are mainly located in the financial districts of London (City and Canary Wharf)
2) probably economics since lse and ucl both are highly regarded for economics but imperial is highly regarded for engineering and is one of the best in the world for engineering.
3) economics leads to a wide variety of careers, as does engineering. A lot of the jobs that you can get with an economics degree are also available with an engineering degree, such as investment banking, which has very high salaries and extremely long hours and high competition.

Overall, both degree subjects would be good for the 3 criteria you specified.
Yeah, when I'm older, I wanna stay in london so I thought that there would be more finance related jobs than actual engineering jobs. Most engineering jobs seem to be outside of London which isnt an option to me.

So i thought Economics would be good for the finance jobs ?
0
reply
High Stakes
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#9
Report 4 years ago
#9
(Original post by SheLikeTheMango)
Well I wanted to go into finance, so I thought doing an Economics degree with lots of finance modules would set me up properly for that. I also had the impression that someone with an Economics degree could rise up the ranks in a bank faster than someone who had an Engineering degree because the one with the Econ degree would have more knowledge for the advanved roles. Am i correct in saying that?
Unfortunately, you're incorrect. If by advanced roles, you're referring to FO positions in an IB, a more mathematically oriented degree will suit you best (i.e. Maths, Engineering etc.) - Your Economics degree may benefit you in that it does possess both mathematical modules and a lot of essay-based modules which will make you more well rounded and I guess better if the position your interested in involves talking to clients.

That said the small differences between these two for IB are almost negligible. I only said Engineering, based on general job prospects. If you're choosing your degree as a means to a degree in Finance then it's completely irrelevant. Do which ever suits you better and make sure you go to the right universities - That's it.

Just to be sure, I'll link Princepieman - They'll be able to give you a very informed answer.
1
reply
High Stakes
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#10
Report 4 years ago
#10
Can I also ask what are all your A levels again? My memory is a bit blurry.
0
reply
bobbybob12
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#11
Report 4 years ago
#11
(Original post by SheLikeTheMango)
Which one is better to do for:
1) Jobs in London
2)Unis in London
3) Salary
1) Engineering with allow you do any related degree and will get you into so general jobs and also careers in the city. Economics gives you a less broad range of jobs and you will get in the city. In the city there i virtually no difference but engineering will allow you to potentially go into quantitative analysis, Economics will not. Engineering will allow you to do a masters in finance or financial engineering.

2) For undergraduate, Imperial and LSE are equally ranked for respectively engineering and economics. UCL is probably the same and thus there probably isn't any further difference.

3) There is more variability with Economics, if you go to private companies, particularly the city, and have a good degree there is great potential, otherwise there is definitely not that good potential. Engineering will ensure that you have a decent low salary if you become an engineer with a stable employment opportunities but if you go into the city the same as Economics. The average front office city worker is paid more then the average engineer but there is not an increasing no. of jobs in the city, but a decreasing. If you have an engineering degree you may become more employable in the city as they look to trade qualitatively and cut back on staff. Engineers - well the number of potential directly related careers is increasing.

If you are looking to make an absolute fortune then engineering probably offers more potential, there is the option of going into something potentially extremely lucrative such as space mining (I am talking billions), whereas with economics you could end up at a hedge fund if you are lucky and VERY good at trading (I am talking millions).

If you are good at engineering related things, physics, mechanics etc and are actually interested in that field then economics go for engineering. I you think that an Economics degree will translate into a higher salary or top job in the city, engineering will do the same and more. BUT if you are seriously passionate about Economics do it. By the way are you going to do A levels next year or are deciding what to apply for?
0
reply
bobbybob12
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#12
Report 4 years ago
#12
(Original post by SheLikeTheMango)
Well I wanted to go into finance, so I thought doing an Economics degree with lots of finance modules would set me up properly for that. I also had the impression that someone with an Economics degree could rise up the ranks in a bank faster than someone who had an Engineering degree because the one with the Econ degree would have more knowledge for the advanved roles. Am i correct in saying that?
There is no effect. You rise solely on performance. Someone with a degree in Classics could have read stacks on finance etc and be actually more passionate then somebody who has taken economics and 'had to do' finance modules as part of their degree. Office politics also plays a big part. The CEO of Goldman Sachs has got a degree in history by the way.
0
reply
SteelManatee
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#13
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#13
(Original post by High Stakes)
Unfortunately, you're incorrect. If by advanced roles, you're referring to FO positions in an IB, a more mathematically oriented degree will suit you best (i.e. Maths, Engineering etc.) - Your Economics degree may benefit you in that it does possess both mathematical modules and a lot of essay-based modules which will make you more well rounded and I guess better if the position your interested in involves talking to clients.

That said the small differences between these two for IB are almost negligible. I only said Engineering, based on general job prospects. If you're choosing your degree as a means to a degree in Finance then it's completely irrelevant. Do which ever suits you better and make sure you go to the right universities - That's it.

Just to be sure, I'll link Princepieman - They'll be able to give you a very informed answer.
Ah I see, I thought Economics had a lot of Maths in it at undergraduate level?

Also wanted to clear something up, are Banks as a whole referred to as Investment Banks or do they have a smaller division within the Bank specifically for Investment banking?
0
reply
SteelManatee
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#14
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#14
(Original post by High Stakes)
Can I also ask what are all your A levels again? My memory is a bit blurry.
Maths, Chemistry, Physics. Not the most ideal subjects for an Economics degree, my A-levels actually seem more set up for an Engineering degree but Economics has got me interested.
0
reply
SteelManatee
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#15
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#15
(Original post by bobbybob12)
1) Engineering with allow you do any related degree and will get you into so general jobs and also careers in the city. Economics gives you a less broad range of jobs and you will get in the city. In the city there i virtually no difference but engineering will allow you to potentially go into quantitative analysis, Economics will not. Engineering will allow you to do a masters in finance or financial engineering.

2) For undergraduate, Imperial and LSE are equally ranked for respectively engineering and economics. UCL is probably the same and thus there probably isn't any further difference.

3) There is more variability with Economics, if you go to private companies, particularly the city, and have a good degree there is great potential, otherwise there is definitely not that good potential. Engineering will ensure that you have a decent low salary if you become an engineer with a stable employment opportunities but if you go into the city the same as Economics. The average front office city worker is paid more then the average engineer but there is not an increasing no. of jobs in the city, but a decreasing. If you have an engineering degree you may become more employable in the city as they look to trade qualitatively and cut back on staff. Engineers - well the number of potential directly related careers is increasing.

If you are looking to make an absolute fortune then engineering probably offers more potential, there is the option of going into something potentially extremely lucrative such as space mining (I am talking billions), whereas with economics you could end up at a hedge fund if you are lucky and VERY good at trading (I am talking millions).

If you are good at engineering related things, physics, mechanics etc and are actually interested in that field then economics go for engineering. I you think that an Economics degree will translate into a higher salary or top job in the city, engineering will do the same and more. BUT if you are seriously passionate about Economics do it. By the way are you going to do A levels next year or are deciding what to apply for?
I've done my AS levels and deciding what to apply for. I didn't think that Engineering would get many jobs in London, that's a big factor for me, staying in London. I just always had the assumption that Economics would be more related to finance jobs.

Might have to draft up an Engineering personal statement now
0
reply
High Stakes
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#16
Report 4 years ago
#16
(Original post by SheLikeTheMango)
Ah I see, I thought Economics had a lot of Maths in it at undergraduate level?

Also wanted to clear something up, are Banks as a whole referred to as Investment Banks or do they have a smaller division within the Bank specifically for Investment banking?
It depends on where you do your degree - If it's a Bsc it will be a lot more mathematical and you will encounter modules such as Econometrics which will require a level of mathematical ability. That said, Engineering will obviously always possess a lot more mathematics than Economics. But as I said before, it's negligible. Banks only want to gauge your quantitative ability, so both degrees will suit you and it's unlikely that one will be valued above the other (supposing they're from the same university).

Investment banks are a separate division of the banking sector:

"Investment Banks expedite the purchase and sales of bonds, stocks and other investments and aid companies in making initial public offerings (IPOs). Commercial banks act as managers for deposit accounts for businesses and individuals, although they are primarily focused on business accounts, and they make public loans through deposit money that they hold."
0
reply
High Stakes
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#17
Report 4 years ago
#17
(Original post by SheLikeTheMango)
Maths, Chemistry, Physics. Not the most ideal subjects for an Economics degree, my A-levels actually seem more set up for an Engineering degree but Economics has got me interested.
You have a great set of A levels for both degrees - Although please note that the top universities will favour applicants with Further Mathematics when it comes to Economics. Your Physics A level is going to have you favoured by a lot of universities when applying for Engineering.
0
reply
SteelManatee
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#18
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#18
(Original post by High Stakes)
You have a great set of A levels for both degrees - Although please note that the top universities will favour applicants with Further Mathematics when it comes to Economics. Your Physics A level is going to have you favoured by a lot of universities when applying for Engineering.
Yeah I've ruled out Oxbridge and LSE from my choices due to not having FM. Although from browsing around on TSR, I've seen that UCL and Warwick don't mind the lack of FM so UCL is my main target (lets hope I get an offer)
0
reply
High Stakes
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#19
Report 4 years ago
#19
(Original post by SheLikeTheMango)
Yeah I've ruled out Oxbridge and LSE from my choices due to not having FM. Although from browsing around on TSR, I've seen that UCL and Warwick don't mind the lack of FM so UCL is my main target (lets hope I get an offer)
My close friend wanted to medicine. If your'e aware, people can only apply to four medical schools, so for his fourth choice he put in Engineering at Warwick. He's doing that now even though his personal statement was for medicine. So you could potentially think about doing that if you don't want to block out both options.
0
reply
tanyapotter
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#20
Report 4 years ago
#20
I would say engineering
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Cardiff Metropolitan University
    Undergraduate Open Day - Llandaff Campus Undergraduate
    Sat, 19 Oct '19
  • Coventry University
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 19 Oct '19
  • University of Birmingham
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 19 Oct '19

Why wouldn't you turn to teachers if you were being bullied?

They might tell my parents (14)
6.57%
They might tell the bully (22)
10.33%
I don't think they'd understand (36)
16.9%
It might lead to more bullying (74)
34.74%
There's nothing they could do (67)
31.46%

Watched Threads

View All