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TSR Philosophy Society (TSR PhilSoc) watch

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    Can I join?! It's all very confusing..
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    is thread about philosophical debate?

    =P
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    hey guys i was wondering cos im interested in doing Dentistry if an AS in Philosphy would help me to get into uni and is it respected. In my GCSE mocks I got an A* for short course R.E and in full course R.E i got an A, do you think with hardly any work I could get an A for philosphy. Can you guys tell me the truth? i wanna know if it's easy enough to get an A as im doing Maths, Bilogy and Chemistry for A-level and I want to concentrate on revising for them
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    You would most definitely NOT get an A if you did hardly any work. Your other subjects are quite hard but Philosophy isn’t a doss subject. Why do you think it’s well respected?!!
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    Having said that, AS is easier than A2 (obviously!) - You would have to work but it wouldn't get in the way too much. I guess it depends what sort of learner you are and whether or not you can come up with a good quality essay..?
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    (Original post by The Abster!)
    hey guys i was wondering cos im interested in doing Dentistry if an AS in Philosphy would help me to get into uni and is it respected.
    If you intend to put the same amount of work into Philosophy as you did into the composition of that sentence, I think that we can all guess what sort of a grade you might receive.

    Dentistry is hard work and an AS in Philosophy would be unlikely to make any difference to your application. You would be better off spending the effort reading outside your existing course and putting together some relevant work experience.
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    I agree with grumballcake - go out and get some work experience. By the way, A level philosophy is nothing like RE at GCSE level just so you know!
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    Would it be possible to pass an A-Level Philosophy course just by studying the subect matter (along with any necessary further reading) on your own?
    The course is not available in my school, but I feel that I have an already quite substantial knowledge of the modules covered (especially Descartes), and that I could put foward my own arguments and try to refute others where necessary. I would really like to take this course, but I don't want to ask if I can until I know whether it would be wise thing to do. :/
    Thoughts?/Has anyone else here ever taken a course like this on their own?

    I shan't worry about what I will or won't take for A-Levels yet though... I'm just going into Year 11.
    Just wondering.
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    You can self-teach A levels, but it's nigh-on impossible for anyone who doesn't know you, your academic ability, your work ethic, and your subject knowledge to predict how successful you'd be. I'd make enquiries with the school about being entered for exams they don't offer etc, and possibly consult a teacher who knows the standard of your essay work - RS/Philo would make sense, but English, History or whatever would serve.
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    in reply to the abster

    thats a pretty naive thing to say about philosophy, its one of the hardest and most intellectually stimulating subjects you could take up, u have to be pretty clever to understand it in my opinion and furthermore there is a large workload. thats the problem people make at gcse...assumption ...if u take this subject you will learn you cant really do that! but nevertheless good luck hun x
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    I certainly wouldn't have done well in Philosophy if I hadn't put in a lot of hard work and effort. It's a challenging subject but really enjoyable too. GCSE RS is a doss in comparison. From what I can remember anyway.
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    I don't know that it actually requires a lot of hard work and effort. I know a lot of people who feel perfectly qualified to hold court on all kinds of philosophical issues when in fact they have studied absolutely nothing about them. But then again, philosophy by it's very nature has a lot of connections with the most basic and "simple" ideas of human existence. We all know what knowledge, good, language and so forth are, don't we? Or at least, surely we all have some right to comment or contribute to these things.
    So I don't think philosophy requires a lot of hard work. But, more than any other subject I know, you get out of philosophy exactly as much as you are willing to put into it. There's always a quick and easy answer, or a long and sophisticated one. And there is always some further interesting idea or question out there, if you care to go look for it.

    Edit: Of course, in terms of passing exams that's mostly moot. But then again, it's a lot easier to pass an A-level if you care about it. I'm not good at philosophy. But I love it enough to do well.
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    I'll second that Calvin. You must be pretty 'good' at Philosophy if you're taking a degree in it at Cambridge University. I'm still contemplating applying to Oxbridge but I'm still worried that, due to my poor/average GCSE results, they wont look at me twice. Anyway, you guys have heard these rants before. I'm sure someone will have me...
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    Correction - you've just finished at Cambridge. Congratulations! How did you get on in your finals? All the best for the future.
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    (This is just a quick note to say, for those of you who have been requesting to join this soc: I have been processing all of your requests, so don't think I'm ignoring you, but a very large proportion of them have been unable to go through because you're already a member of too many societies. So if you tried to join and it hasn't happened...that's why.)

    Zarathustra
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    (Original post by Mat666)
    I would say that there must be some kind of sociological influence on us "english" to make us think we could win each time
    If you mean, does sociology have an influence of British mentality? then yes it does. This however, is a not a philosophy. A philosophy would add a value statement. For example: "Sociology has an influnece of British mentality. This mentality is good". > That is a philosophy as it seeks to explain how people should live.


    (Original post by Mat666)
    Philosophy to me is the investigative question of why things are
    It is an interesting definition of Philosophy, but I think it is a vague one. Philosophy, afterall, means "a love of wisdom", and it isn't necessarily wise to unprioritise philosophy. For example: The question of God's existence cannot be placed on the same philosophical importance as the life cycle of an earthworm or something. In addition, "why things are" is almost on the same level and science. Only science looks at how things are, and then suggests why, whereas philosophy looks at why things are and then suggests how.

    However, I prefer Peter Vardy's definition of Philosophy and particularly Moral Philosophy: "Philosophy is about how we should live and how we should die". And with 2 important facts within this definition (we live and we die), upon those premises must we begin to philosophise.

    In essence, one's philosophy can be determined by how one categorises one's philosophy.


    (Original post by Mat666)
    it is not destined to clean up after science, in my opinon, it is destined to rule alongside it.
    Perhaps so, but are we lovers of Wisdom, or merely lovers of information?
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    There are certainly normative elements to philosophy, but that hardly covers all of it.
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    i'm going to study philosophy at uni, can i join?
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    Hi, I am desperately trying to get my head round A level choices. Definitely doing French, Spanish and English (want to do a language at uni) but possibly interested in philosophy as a joint. Would History be a major help? Alternative is Chemistry which I really enjoy. Thanks for your help.
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    You'll demonstrate you can do essays with those three, so no reason to see History as essential, unless you think you can get a better grade in it than in the others. Otherwise I'd say do the one you enjoy.
 
 
 
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