TSR Philosophy Society (TSR PhilSoc) Watch

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Zarathustra
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#101
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#101
Lmao! I always have that problem lol. Never thought of asking on here though...


Plato Plate-oh
Descartes Day-car
Wittgenstein Vitt-gen-schtein
Nietzsche Knee-tsher
Kierkegaard Keer-ker-gore
Ayer A-yer

Any more (that I know!)? This is fun!

ZarathustraX
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Mishael
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#102
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#102
Keer-ker-gore? :eek:

Ok...ones I THINK I pronounce correctly but am not entirely sure...

Aristole
Sartre
Aquinas
Berkeley (Berk-ELY or Berk-LEY)?
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undercover-ange
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#103
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#103
Ooh while the subject happens to be brought up...how does one pronounce Socrates? (I think that's how it's spelt...as in socratic irony?) I've only ever read the name and always wondered. xxx
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coldfish
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#104
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#104
Like Socratic only with the stress moved to Soc.

Am I the only person who thinks that ethics is the most interesting part of Philosophy? I'm hoping that it is just because it is the area which I have thought most about, and will gain the same passion for metaphysics, but somehow I don't see it happening. :/

alex
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Zarathustra
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#105
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#105
(Original post by Mishael)
Keer-ker-gore? :eek:

Ok...ones I THINK I pronounce correctly but am not entirely sure...

Aristole
Sartre
Aquinas
Berkeley (Berk-ELY or Berk-LEY)?
Yeah Kierkegaard is funny! Damn Danes :rolleyes: (<JOKE>)

Aristotle: 'Aris-tot-tel' (First syllable as in "Iris" but with an "ah" sound at the start).
Sartre: Never sure about this one - I know some people say it like the beginning of "Saachi" (just 'saach'), but that's weird! Other way I've heard is 'Sar-trugh' (as in "ugh that's gross!")
Aquinas: 'Ack-wine-ass' (lmao...)
Berkeley: 'Bark-lee'.

To whoever asked:
Socrates: 'Sock-rah-tees'.

ZarathustraX
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piemonster411
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#106
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#106
i am doing A2 philosophy this year with AQA

if anyone has read Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics what do you think? its a very practical approach to ethics compared to, for example, Plato
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Zarathustra
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#107
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#107
(Original post by coldfish)
Am I the only person who thinks that ethics is the most interesting part of Philosophy? I'm hoping that it is just because it is the area which I have thought most about, and will gain the same passion for metaphysics, but somehow I don't see it happening. :/

alex
Lol, I think Ethics is the most boring part! Must be entirely a matter of tase :rolleyes:

What have you tried that wasn't ethics so far? I can recommend ya some cool stuff...

ZarathustraX

EDIT: Ok, perhaps "cool" wasn't quite the perfect adjective to use there...
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bred
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#108
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#108
(Original post by Zarathustra)
Descartes Day-car
I believe that should be "day-cart"
I would also like to join
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sleepyeba
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#109
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#109
I would like to join, although I'm not a studying philosopher, I do find it very interesting
I had a few lessons on it in General Studies. Very brief intro to it, covered the different truths, reality, and stuff too abstract to remember.
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wanderer
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#110
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#110
(Original post by piemonster411)
i am doing A2 philosophy this year with AQA

if anyone has read Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics what do you think? its a very practical approach to ethics compared to, for example, Plato
Practical? I'm not sure many of us have the time to spend ensuring we cultivate our virtues correctly! I can't really comment further though, as I haven't actually read the original text - I was put off buying it by opening it on a page spent explaining why slavery is right and natural.
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Zarathustra
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#111
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#111
(Original post by wanderer)
Practical? I'm not sure many of us have the time to spend ensuring we cultivate our virtues correctly! I can't really comment further though, as I haven't actually read the original text - I was put off buying it by opening it on a page spent explaining why slavery is right and natural.
I've only read half of NM (I stupidly attempted it at a time when I was far too busy!), but whilst I find Aristotle's style rather laborious I think Virtue Ethics is an ethical theory worthy of much respect. As someone already said - it's practical. I'd rather work out / learn the best way to live my life (according to the virtues or whatever) and then just base my decisions on the way I am than sit back and run through the Hedonic Calculus everytime I'm faced with an ethical decision!!

Perhaps you should read something like this and get an overall view before you judge it.

Imho (with much emphasis on the H and the O!!), Kant and Virtue ethics are the only worthwhile theories around...

*hopes to spark debate*

ZarathustraX
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wanderer
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#112
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#112
(Original post by Zarathustra)
I've only read half of NM (I stupidly attempted it at a time when I was far too busy!), but whilst I find Aristotle's style rather laborious I think Virtue Ethics is an ethical theory worthy of much respect. As someone already said - it's practical. I'd rather work out / learn the best way to live my life (according to the virtues or whatever) and then just base my decisions on the way I am than sit back and run through the Hedonic Calculus everytime I'm faced with an ethical decision!!

Perhaps you should read something like this and get an overall view before you judge it.

Imho (with much emphasis on the H and the O!!), Kant and Virtue ethics are the only worthwhile theories around...

*hopes to spark debate*

ZarathustraX
I didn't say I knew nothing about it, only that I haven't read the NM itself. I don't see why it's seen as any more 'practical' than, say, utilitarianism or situation ethics - all normative ethical theories have difficulties with application. The time and effort it would take to overcome natural inclinations and become habitually virtuous seems fairly impractical to me - plus, determining what is virtuous isn't that easy. The golden mean is a bit too contrived to help much. And Kant ... :p:
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Mimo
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#113
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#113
Hey there!
I would like to join please- it all sounds so interesting!
What's the topic at the moment?
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Zarathustra
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#114
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#114
(Original post by wanderer)
I didn't say I knew nothing about it, only that I haven't read the NM itself. I don't see why it's seen as any more 'practical' than, say, utilitarianism or situation ethics
Because with virtue ethics you cultivate a virtuous character from early life and then are able to simply follow your 'intuition' (in a non intuitionist-theory sense, couldn't think of a better word though!) in moral dilemmas, whereas with Utilitarianism you have to work out every time exactly what the benefits will be and for who (and, if you're following Mill, whether they'll be 'higher' or 'lower' pleasures) and which way the balance falls, etc.

(Original post by wanderer)
- all normative ethical theories have difficulties with application. The time and effort it would take to overcome natural inclinations and become habitually virtuous seems fairly impractical to me - plus, determining what is virtuous isn't that easy. The golden mean is a bit too contrived to help much.
You assume that virtue runs against our natural inclinations...

(Original post by wanderer)
And Kant ... :p:
Yes, and Kant?

ZarathustraX

EDIT: Welcome, Mimo. The current topic is ethics...but feel free to start something else!
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wanderer
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#115
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#115
(Original post by Zarathustra)
Because with virtue ethics you cultivate a virtuous character from early life and then are able to simply follow your 'intuition' (in a non intuitionist-theory sense, couldn't think of a better word though!) in moral dilemmas, whereas with Utilitarianism you have to work out every time exactly what the benefits will be and for who (and, if you're following Mill, whether they'll be 'higher' or 'lower' pleasures) and which way the balance falls, etc.


You assume that virtue runs against our natural inclinations...


Yes, and Kant?

ZarathustraX

EDIT: Welcome, Mimo. The current topic is ethics...but feel free to start something else!
People don't generally pick out their ethical theories in early life, and any suggestion that we can 'instil' virtues in children comes up against some pretty solid evidence to the contrary. Mill specifically points out in 'Utilitarianism' that it isn't necessary to 'work out every time exactly what the benefits will be and for who' - general rules of thumb about what promotes happiness, based on personal and universal experience, are perfectly consistent with the theory (unless you plan on following Bentham religously).

Kant has some very nice reasoning based on some highly flawed premises. The claim that we have a 'clear and distinct notion of duty' is nowhere near sufficient proof of the existence of an objective moral law, and postulating God and an afterlife serves as a rather weak attempt to account for the practical uselessness of the 'kingdom of ends' way of thinking.
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Checking for Spies
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#116
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#116
and what's your view of situation ethics then guys?
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SB
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#117
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#117
Hi, can I join?

I'm doing A level Philosophy (AQA) this year, anyone else absolutely loving political philosophy?

And ethics was my favourite last year, so I'm a weird child, but we already knew that...

Anyone doing J S Mill On Liberty? He makes so much sense its scary, no philosopher can write so its understandable - someone give tham compulsory English lessons! No but seriously, Plato anyone???
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wanderer
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#118
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#118
(Original post by skevvybritt)
Hi, can I join?

I'm doing A level Philosophy (AQA) this year, anyone else absolutely loving political philosophy?

And ethics was my favourite last year, so I'm a weird child, but we already knew that...

Anyone doing J S Mill On Liberty? He makes so much sense its scary, no philosopher can write so its understandable - someone give tham compulsory English lessons! No but seriously, Plato anyone???
I think you'll find Plato wrote in ancient greek ... J S Mill is very clear though. I have On Liberty sitting on a shelf, but haven't got round to it yet. Utilitarianism was very balanced and (amazingly for a philosophy text) concise. Written material gets harder to understand the further back you go, because of the language distance - the linguistic environment J S Mill or Bertrand Russel were writing in were far more similar to ours than that of, say, Descartes or Hobbes, which is why the former are easier for us to read (the principia mathematica aside, of course!)
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piemonster411
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#119
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#119
[QUOTE=skevvybritt]Hi, can I join?

I'm doing A level Philosophy (AQA) this year, anyone else absolutely loving political philosophy?

And ethics was my favourite last year, so I'm a weird child, but we already knew that...
[QUOTE]

Im doing political philosophy. At times highly interesting but at others rather dreary. What do you like about it?

I would of preferred to do philosophy of mind or of religion. :mad: Oh well.
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SB
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#120
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#120
(Original post by piemonster411)
Im doing political philosophy. At times highly interesting but at others rather dreary. What do you like about it?

I would of preferred to do philosophy of mind or of religion. :mad: Oh well.
I've just really enjoyed being able to debate different points of view with my [public girls school, extremely right-wing] classmates.
I've actually managed to change some minds! Small victories...

No but seriously, its so much more relevant to real life (hate to use the expression, yes I know philosophy is the study of just about everything so is all relevant eventually), so much interesting stuff going on in the news that it brings it alive.
For example our dear Charles Clarke and his facist proposed terrorism laws. Doesn't that worry anyone? :afraid:
Sorry, possibly turning this too political for a philosophy forum
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