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    ok I got this past paper question (doesnt matter which board since they all study similar topics). The question is: State 5 reasons why variation is important in the environment. (5 marks) You only have to "state"

    (Original post by ResidentEvil)
    ok I got this past paper question (doesnt matter which board since they all study similar topics). The question is: State 5 reasons why variation is important in the environment. (5 marks) You only have to "state"
    Don't really understand the question. Important to who? or for what? Does it give you any more kind of context or is that it?

    rosie
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    (Original post by ResidentEvil)
    ok I got this past paper question (doesnt matter which board since they all study similar topics). The question is: State 5 reasons why variation is important in the environment. (5 marks) You only have to "state"
    1) More chance of resistance in species to disease
    2) More chance of survival of environmental changes

    I really can't think of anything else at the moment...and i have no idea if i've phrased those ones correctly.

    G
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    (Original post by gzftan)
    1) More chance of resistance in species to disease
    2) More chance of survival of environmental changes
    Yeah, those two reasons sounds good, and just like you, I cant think of any others :confused:

    Crana the question is purely from a past paper (OCR), and I generally think they need not say anymore or elaborate further in that question.

    (Original post by crana)
    Important to who? or for what?
    Important to the world and for living organisms, I guess.

    Just for kicks I wanna ask another question. Name examples of intraspecific competition? I can define it but I have no idea of any examples, and I'm not sure if examples such as foxes competing for food or humans competing for mates is valid?
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    (Original post by ResidentEvil)
    Yeah, those two reasons sounds good, and just like you, I cant think of any others :confused:

    Crana the question is purely from a past paper (OCR), and I generally think they need not say anymore or elaborate further in that question.

    Important to the world and for living organisms, I guess.

    Just for kicks I wanna ask another question. Name examples of intraspecific competition? I can define it but I have no idea of any examples, and I'm not sure if examples such as foxes competing for food or humans competing for mates is valid?
    sorry i cant remember but is intraspecific within a species? or between diff species?

    if within then your reasons are correct.
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    (Original post by ShOcKzZ)
    sorry i cant remember but is intraspecific within a species? or between diff species?

    if within then your reasons are correct.
    Intra = within Inter = between.
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    (Original post by ResidentEvil)
    Just for kicks I wanna ask another question. Name examples of intraspecific competition? I can define it but I have no idea of any examples, and I'm not sure if examples such as foxes competing for food or humans competing for mates is valid?
    Yeh..those are fine...generally intraspecific competition is for food+resources, mates, area as well...territory and the such-like.

    G
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    I kinda thought of another one..but i have no idea if it's covered by/covers the reasons i gave earlier....

    3) To allow the process of natural selection, and thus evolution to occur????

    G
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    (Original post by gzftan)
    I kinda thought of another one..but i have no idea if it's covered by/covers the reasons i gave earlier....

    3) To allow the process of natural selection, and thus evolution to occur????

    G
    hmmm thats kind of just "defining" variation in some sense.

    I cant think of 5 either! it's really hard, but I guess that will probably be a valid answer for a ridiculous 5 reasoning question.
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    (Original post by ResidentEvil)
    ok I got this past paper question (doesnt matter which board since they all study similar topics). The question is: State 5 reasons why variation is important in the environment. (5 marks) You only have to "state"
    Genetic variation geared to favour heterozygote so all alleles are maintained. If there was no genetic variation it is possible an organism with only dominant/recessive alleles may be favoured at that particular time.

    Promotes natural selection and thus encourages evolution

    Allows for adaptations to the environment which will provide them with an advantage so they are better able to survive - they are "evolutionary fitter"

    Genetic variance allows for the survival of the species in the event of a disease emerging. Different alleles means some organisms will always have resistance to any potential disease. (although this is debatable it is a valid point)

    Sorry only got these!

    Interspecific between species (extremely hard to analyse in nature so bacteria cultures are used). Example cited in the OCR book is between the flour beetles Tribolium castaneum and Tribolium confusum. Or just T.castaneum and T.confusum for short.

    (Original post by cipapfatso)
    Genetic variation geared to favour heterozygote so all alleles are maintained. If there was no genetic variation it is possible an organism with only dominant/recessive alleles may be favoured at that particular time.
    why is this especially important in the environment? confused..

    rosie
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    (Original post by crana)
    why is this especially important in the environment? confused..

    rosie
    Because as the heterozygote is maintained all alleles are maintained in the population. If some organisms had an advantage and could resist a disease they survive no problem. Others shall die. The ones with resistance have a genotype offering them that advantage but what's stopping the genotype of the ones that die from disappearing altogether or declining too rapidly? So in future if a different disease appears the ones who had the correct genotype may already be dead and the survivng ones susceptible, so the population is wiped out or cut down to brink of extinction.
    The maintenance of the heterozygote in a population means all alleles are retained, so the population is stabilised, which is thus advantageous to populations, even if conditions change.
    I hope I explained it better!

    Although to be honest if I was asked to list 3 (I can't even think of 5) i wouldn't choose this one. Requires too much explaining

    (Original post by cipapfatso)
    Because as the heterozygote is maintained all alleles are maintained in the population. If some organisms had an advantage and could resist a disease they survive no problem. Others shall die. The ones with resistance have a genotype offering them that advantage but what's stopping the genotype of the ones that die from disappearing altogether or declining too rapidly? So in future if a different disease appears the ones who had the correct genotype may already be dead and the survivng ones susceptible, so the population is wiped out or cut down to brink of extinction.
    The maintenance of the heterozygote in a population means all alleles are retained, so the population is stabilised, which is thus advantageous to populations, even if conditions change.
    I hope I explained it better!

    Although to be honest if I was asked to list 3 (I can't even think of 5) i wouldn't choose this one. Requires too much explaining
    getcha

    I think its a silly question though - who exactly is this important to or for? putative future generations? the organism's genes? the present organisms? humans? - to some of them may be important but in a negative way! if that makes sense.

    e.g. it does not benefit the current organisms to carry undesireable genes just because they may be helpful to their descendents (if that makes sense)

    rosie
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    (Original post by crana)
    getcha

    I think its a silly question though - who exactly is this important to or for? putative future generations? the organism's genes? the present organisms? humans? - to some of them may be important but in a negative way! if that makes sense.

    e.g. it does not benefit the current organisms to carry undesireable genes just because they may be helpful to their descendents (if that makes sense)

    rosie
    I understand what you're saying too. Both are valid I guess it is down to interpretation. I just see it that the larger the gene pool the better it is for the overall survival of the population as at some point or another selection pressures are bound to favour different genotypes.
    Still its an argument which can be used either way as you just mentioned so it's not likely to be one you will put down on the exam paper when there are more feasible suggestions

    (Original post by cipapfatso)
    I understand what you're saying too. Both are valid I guess it is down to interpretation. I just see it that the larger the gene pool the better it is for the overall survival of the population as at some point or another selection pressures are bound to favour different genotypes.
    Still its an argument which can be used either way as you just mentioned so it's not likely to be one you will put down on the exam paper when there are more feasible suggestions
    the way biology papers are marked they would probably completely ignore the context of yoru argument and just look - has the person included the KEY WORDS heterozygote. evolution. selection pressure. etc

    its a bit of a farce really

    rosie
 
 
 

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