ToluwaEdson
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I have recently done two resists and before the resists I had 80 out of 120 credits. I have got my results back and now I have 100/120 credits... so I basically I failed one resist and passed the other one

I am a First year student and the decision the board made was that I will only have to retake the one module in the academic year of 2015/2016 and then if I pass it i'll be able to progress onto year 2 in 2016/2017..

I don't know what to do ..... I know in some uni's they allow you to take up to 20 credits into the following year and do it with your 2nd year modules or being eligible for a compensated pass.

In the quantity handbook of my uni it says ' A board may use its discretion to allow a student to enter level 5 or level 6 of a course carrying a deficiency, normally of up to 20 credits'

My grades from 1st year
1st Module - Low 2.1
2nd Module - Low third
3rd Module - Mid Third
4th Module - High Third
5th Module - High Third - (in the cw I got a High 2.2) (1st attempt - mid fail) (referral attempt 40%)
6th Module - (First attempt 38%) (referral Attempt 34%)

I want to appeal against this decision as I feel it's a bit unfair.. please can anybody give me advice on this situation
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claireestelle
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(Original post by ToluwaEdson)
I have recently done two resists and before the resists I had 80 out of 120 credits. I have got my results back and now I have 100/120 credits... so I basically I failed one resist and passed the other one

I am a First year student and the decision the board made was that I will only have to retake the one module in the academic year of 2015/2016 and then if I pass it i'll be able to progress onto year 2 in 2016/2017..

I don't know what to do ..... I know in some uni's they allow you to take up to 20 credits into the following year and do it with your 2nd year modules or being eligible for a compensated pass.

In the quantity handbook of my uni it says ' A board may use its discretion to allow a student to enter level 5 or level 6 of a course carrying a deficiency, normally of up to 20 credits'

My grades from 1st year
1st Module - Low 2.1
2nd Module - Low third
3rd Module - Mid Third
4th Module - High Third
5th Module - High Third - (in the cw I got a High 2.2) (1st attempt - mid fail) (referral attempt 40%)
6th Module - (First attempt 38%) (referral Attempt 34%)

I want to appeal against this decision as I feel it's a bit unfair.. please can anybody give me advice on this situation
I m afraid especially if that module is a core one you probably won't get it wavered. Go see your su and see what they say
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Klix88
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(Original post by ToluwaEdson)
In the quantity handbook of my uni it says ' A board may use its discretion to allow a student to enter level 5 or level 6 of a course carrying a deficiency, normally of up to 20 credits'

My grades from 1st year
1st Module - Low 2.1
2nd Module - Low third
3rd Module - Mid Third
4th Module - High Third
5th Module - High Third - (in the cw I got a High 2.2) (1st attempt - mid fail) (referral attempt 40%)
6th Module - (First attempt 38%) (referral Attempt 34%)

I want to appeal against this decision as I feel it's a bit unfair.. please can anybody give me advice on this situation
I can't see how it's unfair, I'm afraid. The Board is using its discretion as the rules say they can.

If you were a solid student and just had a problem with one module, you would probably be allowed the carry forward. As it is, you're averaging a third with two failed modules, and you got an even lower result on one than on your first failed attempt. My suspicion is that you would struggle to retake a module on top of your full second year programme, when your second year could well be a step up from the work you've already done.

I think the Board are being sensible. They'd rather have you complete the first year successfully, taking an extra year, than pile additional work onto you which risks causing a failure in your second year as well. It might not *feel* fair to you right now, but from the outside it does seem a sensible approach which is taking your future at uni seriously and giving you the best possible chance of eventual success.

As it is, "other unis" don't have blanket rules for students in your situation. All will allow an amount of academic judgement to be exercised, which tailors a solution to each individual student where necessary. That won't be grounds for appeal as it simply isn't true.
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ToluwaEdson
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(Original post by Klix88)
I can't see how it's unfair, I'm afraid. The Board is using its discretion as the rules say they can.

If you were a solid student and just had a problem with one module, you would probably be allowed the carry forward. As it is, you're averaging a third with two failed modules, and you got an even lower result on one than on your first failed attempt. My suspicion is that you would struggle to retake a module on top of your full second year programme, when your second year could well be a step up from the work you've already done.

I think the Board are being sensible. They'd rather have you complete the first year successfully, taking an extra year, than pile additional work onto you which risks causing a failure in your second year as well. It might not *feel* fair to you right now, but from the outside it does seem a sensible approach which is taking your future at uni seriously and giving you the best possible chance of eventual success.

As it is, "other unis" don't have blanket rules for students in your situation. All will allow an amount of academic judgement to be exercised, which tailors a solution to each individual student where necessary. That won't be grounds for appeal as it simply isn't true.
]

I understand, but I know another student who was in the same exact position as me. the module leader or exam board allowed her to continue with the failed module (the same module I failed) and continue with 2nd year modules on top of that

Another 2nd year that's going into 3rd year now has told me they were allowed to continue with 2nd year even though they had 100/120 credits in first year. They told them 'if you do not pass the failed module in that following year you get withdrawn from the course.'

I understand it's hard work, but i'm willing to put in so much effort to do the failed module with second year modules. Also at the time of that examination period I had been going through family problems and I was not in the right frame of mind.
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Klix88
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(Original post by ToluwaEdson)
]

I understand, but I know another student who was in the same exact position as me. the module leader or exam board allowed her to continue with the failed module (the same module I failed) and continue with 2nd year modules on top of that

Another 2nd year that's going into 3rd year now has told me they were allowed to continue with 2nd year even though they had 100/120 credits in first year. They told them 'if you do not pass the failed module in that following year you get withdrawn from the course.'

I understand it's hard work, but i'm willing to put in so much effort to do the failed module with second year modules. Also at the time of that examination period I had been going through family problems and I was not in the right frame of mind.
Each situation will be judged on its individual merits. Your Exam Board won't allow an appeal based on confidential information or hearsay about decisions regarding other students in different years, on different courses or at other universities.

The bottom line is that the decision has been made that you are not capable of doing well with an extra module to cover next year. The results you quote above wouldn't fill anyone with confidence in your ability to do so. Bumping along with a 3rd average and a one-third failure rate, isn't an indicator that you could cope with extra work.

If you had extenuating circumstances for both your initial failure and resit, then there were mechanisms to formally submit these. Claiming them now just sounds like an excuse - as harsh as that may sound, you wouldn't be raising the issue if you'd passed.

You need to come to terms with the decision and concentrate on passing the module that you have next year. Stop wasting your energy thinking up ways to appeal and spurious ways in which you've been treated unfairly. You haven't.
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ToluwaEdson
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(Original post by Klix88)
Each situation will be judged on its individual merits. Your Exam Board won't allow an appeal based on confidential information or hearsay about decisions regarding other students in different years, on different courses or at other universities.

The bottom line is that the decision has been made that you are not capable of doing well with an extra module to cover next year. The results you quote above wouldn't fill anyone with confidence in your ability to do so. Bumping along with a 3rd average and a one-third failure rate, isn't an indicator that you could cope with extra work.

If you had extenuating circumstances for both your initial failure and resit, then there were mechanisms to formally submit these. Claiming them now just sounds like an excuse - as harsh as that may sound, you wouldn't be raising the issue if you'd passed.

You need to come to terms with the decision and concentrate on passing the module that you have next year. Stop wasting your energy thinking up ways to appeal and spurious ways in which you've been treated unfairly. You haven't.
I had extenuating circumstances for the resit
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0range
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(Original post by ToluwaEdson)
I had extenuating circumstances for the resit
I was in the exact position as you, had to resit my exams, I had mitigating circumstances. Thing is, I told my uni about these before hand and while they were going on.. I ended up getting 60 credit during the resit period and totalled to 105/120. I know how you must be feeling, but rules are rules really, you had a second chance in August and it still didn't work out and from the schools point of view you really dont have any excuses. I know with my university you have a set period of time to submit mitigating circumstances.

Student finance won't be available to you as an external student, so the best thing you could do is get a job and make sure you pass it the next time the exam is held. (If you fail again you get excluded as far as I know) Maybe start studying for next year modules as well?
I know it is pretty ****ty but I don't think there will be anything you can do, especially when the academic year starts in like a week now.

Was it a pass for progression module you failed?
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Duncan2012
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(Original post by ToluwaEdson)
I had extenuating circumstances for the resit
But you didn't for the first attempt. Being honest for a moment, if you can't pass the first year why should the university think you'd be able to pass the second year, even without the additional pressure of another attempt at a failed module?
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Inazuma
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It's very fair, don't bother appealing.
My housemate had similar, failed resit at 38 same as before but had 2.2/2.1 average and still had to redo the year doing just that one module.

Bear in mind depending on your uni it may be capped (my friend's was and he didn't realise... was on track for a 1st in that resit!)
Just suck it up, do that year and put your effort into it, and maybe look at modules ahead too.
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Klix88
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(Original post by 0range)
Student finance won't be available to you as an external student
It may not be as bad a situation as this.

SF entitlement depends on how the uni registers a student. If registered as part-time, then they get the Tuition Fee Loan only. If registered as full-time, they will get their full SF entitlement, even if resitting only part of the year. Under some circumstances a uni can register a student as "part-time on a full-time course", which establishes the full SF entitlement. Thus seems unlikely with only one module to take, but it's worth the OP asking, just to be sure.

You cannot retake a full module (attend lectures, hand in assessed coursework and sit exams) unless you're registered with a uni, so there's no real concept of being an "external student" in this situation.
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Klix88
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(Original post by ToluwaEdson)
I had extenuating circumstances for the resit
Then the Exam Board will have taken this into account and adjusted your mark upwards accordingly, in line with the severity of your problems. Which means that you actually got less (possibly much less) than 34% for your resit.
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0range
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(Original post by Klix88)
It may not be as bad a situation as this.

SF entitlement depends on how the uni registers a student. If registered as part-time, then they get the Tuition Fee Loan only. If registered as full-time, they will get their full SF entitlement, even if resitting only part of the year. Under some circumstances a uni can register a student as "part-time on a full-time course", which establishes the full SF entitlement. Thus seems unlikely with only one module to take, but it's worth the OP asking, just to be sure.

You cannot retake a full module (attend lectures, hand in assessed coursework and sit exams) unless you're registered with a uni, so there's no real concept of being an "external student" in this situation.
I don't see why the OP would be allowed to retake the whole module though as oppose to just the exam, atleast that's how it works at my uni, if you fail August resits then you take the exam again at the next available sitting as an external student, so you wouldn't go into lectures, have access to librarys and stuff like that. I assumed that the OP wouldnt be retaking the whole module, he'd only be resitting the one exam.

I find it extremely unlikely that the uni would give him the chance to retake the whole module without mitigating circumstances. I'm basing this on the stuff I've read so hey could totally be wrong.



Anyway Good luck OP!
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Inazuma
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(Original post by 0range)
I find it extremely unlikely that the uni would give him the chance to retake the whole module without mitigating circumstances. I'm basing this on the stuff I've read so hey could totally be wrong.


Anyway Good luck OP!
That's what my uni (Bristol) allows and that's with no extenuating circumstances. It varies by uni I imagine.



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Klix88
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(Original post by 0range)
I don't see why the OP would be allowed to retake the whole module though as oppose to just the exam, atleast that's how it works at my uni, if you fail August resits then you take the exam again at the next available sitting as an external student, so you wouldn't go into lectures, have access to librarys and stuff like that. I assumed that the OP wouldnt be retaking the whole module, he'd only be resitting the one exam.

I find it extremely unlikely that the uni would give him the chance to retake the whole module without mitigating circumstances. I'm basing this on the stuff I've read so hey could totally be wrong.
It's common at the unis I've attended and we see it here frequently on TSR. In my third undergrad year, two of my lecture series were attended by students retaking after failing modules the previous year. They came to all of the lectures (at least two of them had mandatory lecture attendance as part of their retake requirement, officially classed as "Retake with full engagement"), submitted the coursework and sat the exam.

Each case is judged on its own merits. With the OP's academic track record, it would seem pointless to make them submit coursework or sit exams without giving access to study/research/revision facilities. They appear to have strugged even with full access - without it, failure seems almost inevitable. Coursework/exams will cover different topics than those from the last academic year. The uni is being as helpful as it can under the circumstances. Their uni appears to be giving them a chance to concentrate on a module which has clearly given them a serious problem. It's possible that, in the cases you've read about, very capable students were just seen as having bad days for the exam/resit.

You have to be a registered student with a uni in order to sit exams there. You cannot be an "external candidate" in the same sense that you could for an A Level retake.
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