Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/M.E

Watch
Emhelena1
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#1
Hi there,

In January I got glandular fever and was quite ill with it, I also has tonsillitis at the same time and my GP misdiagnosed it completely and told me I had conjunctivitis and a sore throat, despite having ALL of the symptoms of glandular fever (including a tennis ball sized lump on my neck). So I suffered for a good 3 weeks with it until it got progressively worse and at the end of January I was hospitalized with Sepsis and they finally found the glandular fever virus when they were doing all the blood tests. I was extremely poorly and if I had got to hospital any later I would most likely have passed away.

So gradually I semi-recovered and got back into work gradually and tried to get back to normality but there had been a lingering 'unwell-ness' about me and it has been progressively getting worse. It kind of feels like when I had glandular fever but with added joint pain, muscle pain, memory and concentration loss and just all around tiredness.

So in a nut shell, 8-9 months after becoming ill I still feel so not right. On the NHS website it says that post-viral fatigue becomes classed at chronic fatigue syndrome after 6 months of continuous symptoms.

I've been to my GP (A different one to who I saw originally) and have told him everything, and was diagnosed with depression and prescribed me anti-depressants. I tried explaining that rather than my tiredness etc being a side effect of being depressed, its the other way round. I'm a almost 19 year old who feels like an 80 year old woman which is whats getting me down. He also hinted at the fact that because my mum has CFS that I am imitating her, and he doesnt want to label me with chronic fatigue.

Can anyone give an opinion on this? Im desperate and I feel so helpless because no one will take me seriously
0
reply
Little Popcorns
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#2
Report 5 years ago
#2
(Original post by Emhelena1)
Hi there,

In January I got glandular fever and was quite ill with it, I also has tonsillitis at the same time and my GP misdiagnosed it completely and told me I had conjunctivitis and a sore throat, despite having ALL of the symptoms of glandular fever (including a tennis ball sized lump on my neck). So I suffered for a good 3 weeks with it until it got progressively worse and at the end of January I was hospitalized with Sepsis and they finally found the glandular fever virus when they were doing all the blood tests. I was extremely poorly and if I had got to hospital any later I would most likely have passed away.

So gradually I semi-recovered and got back into work gradually and tried to get back to normality but there had been a lingering 'unwell-ness' about me and it has been progressively getting worse. It kind of feels like when I had glandular fever but with added joint pain, muscle pain, memory and concentration loss and just all around tiredness.

So in a nut shell, 8-9 months after becoming ill I still feel so not right. On the NHS website it says that post-viral fatigue becomes classed at chronic fatigue syndrome after 6 months of continuous symptoms.

I've been to my GP (A different one to who I saw originally) and have told him everything, and was diagnosed with depression and prescribed me anti-depressants. I tried explaining that rather than my tiredness etc being a side effect of being depressed, its the other way round. I'm a almost 19 year old who feels like an 80 year old woman which is whats getting me down. He also hinted at the fact that because my mum has CFS that I am imitating her, and he doesnt want to label me with chronic fatigue.

Can anyone give an opinion on this? Im desperate and I feel so helpless because no one will take me seriously
Gosh that all sounds pretty horrible. I had some awful health related stuff similar to what you describe about a year ago and I too still feel like an old lady it really is depressing. Are you sure he's suggesting you're imitating your mum and not that it's possible you have the same thing because she does too?
Did you try the antidepressants? I'm not suggesting you're only depressed don't worry just wondering.
0
reply
affluentmakaveli
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#3
Report 5 years ago
#3
Hopefully this will help.

You could try asking questions to an MD (Doctor) online, there are some websites which give professional responses through forums.

I would advise myself but thought a professional would help.
0
reply
Samwin
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#4
Report 5 years ago
#4
In the exact same position as you as it goes, however have since after twelve bouts had my tonsils removed, but like you still feel horrendous, even with being on anti depressants for two months... Hope you get somewhere soon, it's horrible to not be taken seriously!
0
reply
Little Popcorns
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#5
Report 5 years ago
#5
(Original post by Samwin)
In the exact same position as you as it goes, however have since after twelve bouts had my tonsils removed, but like you still feel horrendous, even with being on anti depressants for two months... Hope you get somewhere soon, it's horrible to not be taken seriously!
Did the antidepressants help at all? Or what change did you notice on them good or bad if any?
0
reply
Samwin
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#6
Report 5 years ago
#6
They helped with the anxiety to be honest, but as for the tiredeness and stuff... no
0
reply
Emhelena1
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#7
(Original post by Little Popcorns)
Gosh that all sounds pretty horrible. I had some awful health related stuff similar to what you describe about a year ago and I too still feel like an old lady it really is depressing. Are you sure he's suggesting you're imitating your mum and not that it's possible you have the same thing because she does too?
Did you try the antidepressants? I'm not suggesting you're only depressed don't worry just wondering.
Aw I'm so sorry you also feel this way. I can totally relate! I hope you do feel better eventually xx

Yeah, his words were "when you live with your mum and you see her symptoms it's easy to convince yourself you are experiencing the same thing"

I have been on the anti-depressants, they're called Citralopram I think. They do seem to have helped lift my mood, which is good. I just hate the idea of being on anti-depressants!
0
reply
Emhelena1
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#8
(Original post by affluentmakaveli)
Hopefully this will help.

You could try asking questions to an MD (Doctor) online, there are some websites which give professional responses through forums.

I would advise myself but thought a professional would help.
Thank you, I will look into that xxx
0
reply
Emhelena1
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#9
(Original post by Samwin)
In the exact same position as you as it goes, however have since after twelve bouts had my tonsils removed, but like you still feel horrendous, even with being on anti depressants for two months... Hope you get somewhere soon, it's horrible to not be taken seriously!
Oh gosh! Twelve is a lot of times to have to cope with! I could barely manage having it the once!

Thank you, I hope to get somewhere soon as well! I'm sure I will eventually
0
reply
affluentmakaveli
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#10
Report 5 years ago
#10
(Original post by Emhelena1)
Thank you, I will look into that xxx
You're welcome.
0
reply
Emhelena1
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#11
(Original post by Foo.mp3)
#1: Double check you fit the bill for ME/CFS by contemporary definitions

#2: Get yourself an advocate (see local support groups and ME/CFS charities like action for M.E. for info)

#3: Get yourself to a GP (ideally a different one) with this advocate

#4: Get yourself referred to a specialist clinic for a proper diagnosis if there is one in your region/a nearby region you can make it to

Also recommend you take a look at the ME/CFS society on TSR, my original wellness protocol, and my more advanced research (which is forming the basis of a more advanced protocol), for further insights. Feel free to PM if you've any Q's. If I lived nearer you I'd volunteer to advocate for you myself, some GPs are tools
Wow thank you so much, I think I will try that! I really appreciate that info xxxxxx
0
reply
Samwin
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#12
Report 5 years ago
#12
Gonna be going to the doctors on Wednesday to talk about having M.E... dreading it, as usually they see I have Aspergers and automatically dismiss me.. any tips on how to approach a GP on the subject would be gratefully appreciated

Dreading this week actually, on another round of antibiotics, drops and pain relief, have to start back at work this week (volunteering at a local nursery as part of my uni course) and have uni to do too could cry hurts to even stand for short periods of time..
0
reply
Emhelena1
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#13
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#13
(Original post by Samwin)
Gonna be going to the doctors on Wednesday to talk about having M.E... dreading it, as usually they see I have Aspergers and automatically dismiss me.. any tips on how to approach a GP on the subject would be gratefully appreciated

Dreading this week actually, on another round of antibiotics, drops and pain relief, have to start back at work this week (volunteering at a local nursery as part of my uni course) and have uni to do too could cry hurts to even stand for short periods of time..
I would advise going in there confidently and telling them exactly how you are feeling, don't hold back. I always went in there feeling a bit vulnerable and the first time I just accepted what he told me (Even though I felt he didn't really take in what I was saying) as I'm generally not an argumentative person. It might help if you prepare what you will say before hand and even bring in some notes?

I really feel for you, it's so hard juggling every day life with feeling like this. And I completely get the part about standing for even short periods of time. I'm fortunate that I have a desk job and am able to sit down majority of the time.

I hope it goes well for you, let me know how you get on! xxx
1
reply
xfirekittyx
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#14
Report 5 years ago
#14
Hey guys, don't know whether this is the right place but as a third year with CFS/M.E who really, really regrets her course due to said CFS/M.E I just wanted to share some tips as I didn't really know what was important apart from quiet accommodation and not having too many contact hours when I was applying.

1. Make sure your course has proper seminars/ tutorials. Learning is thought to be built on 'scaffolding' we build knowledge upon previously laid foundations. If you've missed school due to illness you are at a disadvantage already and having some form of 'active learning' will help. My course advertises itself in having seminars/ tutorials but in reality this means a seminar is over 100 people (where one or two people dare to answer the lecturer's questions) which is NOT a seminar. We saw our personal tutor twice in second year in scheduling (I saw him a few more times due to problems). I did a lot better in my open units, when there were discussions and activities in actual seminars (no more then 30 people).

2. Ask what the course's policy is on missed coursework. When I went to uni open days, the one's I asked said that if a student was ill they'd just average the grade out. This happened at my sister's uni too when she was sick so I just presumed it was the done thing. My uni, every piece has to be completed to progress. This was really hard when you are trying to do the next piece of work at the same time...which brings me on to 3.

3. Coursework extensions, make sure your course is flexible about when you hand things - because relapses, infections and bad days at uni are all too common. My course has a no extensions policy (fun times). This is not a universal policy across my uni. It added a lot of unnecessary stress getting it sorted out.


4. Make sure if your course is coursework heavy, the weightings reflect this. I spent the majority of my time at university just trying to hand coursework in on time....the majority of marks on my course are gained by exams.

5. Consider a gap year...seriously. I thought because I'd taken three years over a-levels (1AS, 2AS, 3A2) building up that I just couldn't get behind another year (and ended up being too ill and having to suspend my studies anyway). All my friends were at uni etc so I thought I'd be so lonely term time that my mental health would be negatively affected but when I had to suspend it turned out to be fine. You will survive and you'll be in a much better place to live independently.
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Should the school day be extended to help students catch up?

Yes (78)
29.21%
No (189)
70.79%

Watched Threads

View All