Philosophy BA (V500) v Philosophy BSc (V502)? What's the difference?

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tom.harker
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Hello,

I'm applying to University of Hull for 2016 entry for a Philosophy degree and when filling out UCAS I realized that there were two separate courses. One with a BSc and one with a BA, but upon looking at Hull's website I couldn't find what the difference between the courses were except for the letters at the end of your degree. Unistats also showed different employment & further study rates, of which the BSc was lower, was just wondering what the difference between the courses were so I knew which to apply for?

Thank you

http://www2.hull.ac.uk/ug/courses/philosophy-bsc.aspx
http://www2.hull.ac.uk/ug/courses/philosophy.aspx
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Andi Elliott
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V500 is a Bachelor of Arts and V502 is a Bachelor of Science degree. "BSc programmes are for students with a background in Maths who want to use it formally within this degree, which is specially designed to take advantage of this background. This would involve further and more rigorous training in Maths and in particularly Statistics ". "BA programmes are intended for students who wish to follow a rather wider and less quantitative syllabus. Lots of our BA students do in fact have an A level in Maths but have chosen not to take the BSc degree which emphasises the quantitative aspects of the subject." "However, as far as employers are concerned, unless graduates are applying for certain specialisms such as actuarial work, they will not mind whether the graduate comes from a BSc programme or a BA programme. The important thing for employers is that the graduate has a very good understanding of fundamental economic principles and has very good class of degree and possibly work experience."

Source: http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/eco...ergraduate/faq

Hope this helped ^_^
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tom.harker
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Thanks :-) it helped clear up the difference between the two but I don't understand the use of maths in a philosophy degree when there are no other universities I have looked at with this option. If anyone from Hull studying Philosophy knows the difference between the two course it would be much appreciated :-P
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Yellow 03
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(Original post by tom.harker)
Thanks :-) it helped clear up the difference between the two but I don't understand the use of maths in a philosophy degree when there are no other universities I have looked at with this option. If anyone from Hull studying Philosophy knows the difference between the two course it would be much appreciated :-P
There are areas in philosophy that have great similarities with mathematics, such as logic, set theory, philosophy of language and the analytic approach in general. Other areas of philosophy tackle problems which are less quantifiable or mathematical.

Depending on which of the two courses you take, the modules will vary accordingly, so you have to make a decision as to where your interests lie and where your skills lie. Have a look at a few past syllabi of modules if you can, as this will give you a clearer picture.
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tom.harker
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(Original post by Yellow 03)
There are areas in philosophy that have great similarities with mathematics, such as logic, set theory, philosophy of language and the analytic approach in general. Other areas of philosophy tackle problems which are less quantifiable or mathematical.

Depending on which of the two courses you take, the modules will vary accordingly, so you have to make a decision as to where your interests lie and where your skills lie. Have a look at a few past syllabi of modules if you can, as this will give you a clearer picture.
Sorry, I'm being confusing. I know there's philosophers like Descartes that were users of maths in their theories but there's no information on Hull's website about the difference between the two. As in specific module differences, or at least I can't find it.
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Yellow 03
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(Original post by tom.harker)
Sorry, I'm being confusing. I know there's philosophers like Descartes that were users of maths in their theories but there's no information on Hull's website about the difference between the two. As in specific module differences, or at least I can't find it.
You are not being confusing, but I think you are missing my own point. I am not talking about Descartes, and you would not be doing Descartes in a BSc of philosophy anyway. You would instead be doing modules such as logic, set theory etc as I mentioned in my previous post. If you google the Raven Paradox you will see a classic problem of philosophy that is pure logic and uses mathematics. This is the kind of thing you would be studying on a BSc. My feeling is that you should go for the BA rather the BSc as you seem unfamiliar with inductive logic. It's a pity they don't list the modules and syllabus as this would help people understand better what they are getting into.
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Apustow
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Have a look at the programmes and modules website for the two courses

https://www.courses.hull.ac.uk/progr...16/270001.html

https://www.courses.hull.ac.uk/progr...16/270002.htmls

especially the programme structure sections where it lists the modules that will be taken for each year, with links to even further detail on each one also.
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