Gluten free advice please

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pinkstudent63
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Hello,

My doctor has told me to go back on a gluten free diet but it's expensive and doesn't taste good so I was wondering what everyone else does? Any coupon websites, deal websites and recipes (including bread that tastes and seems like normal 5050 bread) will be great too Thank you in advance!
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WokSz
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Have you looked into making different soups? If you don't already have one, get a blender and go down to your local market to buy some local produce. My family's really into kale and potato soup.
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Rat_Bag
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(Original post by pinkstudent63)
Hello,

My doctor has told me to go back on a gluten free diet but it's expensive and doesn't taste good so I was wondering what everyone else does? Any coupon websites, deal websites and recipes (including bread that tastes and seems like normal 5050 bread) will be great too Thank you in advance!
Why has your doctor told you to go on a gluten free diet? Do you have Coeliac's Disease?
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pinkstudent63
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(Original post by WokSz)
Have you looked into making different soups? If you don't already have one, get a blender and go down to your local market to buy some local produce. My family's really into kale and potato soup.
We made a vegetable soup which was ok, not brilliant but I'm a bit fussy about what I eat.
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pinkstudent63
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(Original post by Rat_Bag)
Why has your doctor told you to go on a gluten free diet? Do you have Coeliac's Disease?
I don't think so but she said that it would give me a boost with my other health issues.
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WokSz
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(Original post by pinkstudent63)
We made a vegetable soup which was ok, not brilliant but I'm a bit fussy about what I eat.
Fair enough. Just try different combinations. Soup is a really healthy alternative!
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Rat_Bag
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(Original post by pinkstudent63)
I don't think so but she said that it would give me a boost with my other health issues.
Okay, because gluten-free diets are only really going to benefit Coeliac's disease, and maybe in a small numbers of cases of Crohns and Ulcerative Colitis.

Did your GP initiate the issue of a gluten-free diet (both this occasion and previous occasions)? Or has it been a subject you have introduced into the conversation and your GP has gone along with? I ask because "gluten-free" is very faddish at the moment, and especially for people with IBS, many GPs will just go along with what patients think is causing the problems, since IBS is primarily psychosomatic anyway.
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Rat_Bag
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(Original post by pinkstudent63)
I don't think so but she said that it would give me a boost with my other health issues.
Also, if there is a medical reason to have a gluten free diet, then you should be able to get gluten free products on prescription (not something I support, but it is there nonetheless)
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Tiger Rag
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(Original post by Rat_Bag)
Also, if there is a medical reason to have a gluten free diet, then you should be able to get gluten free products on prescription (not something I support, but it is there nonetheless)
You can only get that if it's been proven that gluten is causing the problem.
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pinkstudent63
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(Original post by WokSz)
Fair enough. Just try different combinations. Soup is a really healthy alternative!
Thanks, I'll see if I can make some for uni, although I eat soup with bread so I still need to find a nice bread recipe! I would love to make more meals from scratch, it's just finding really nice recipes
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pinkstudent63
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(Original post by Rat_Bag)
Okay, because gluten-free diets are only really going to benefit Coeliac's disease, and maybe in a small numbers of cases of Crohns and Ulcerative Colitis.

Did your GP initiate the issue of a gluten-free diet (both this occasion and previous occasions)? Or has it been a subject you have introduced into the conversation and your GP has gone along with? I ask because "gluten-free" is very faddish at the moment, and especially for people with IBS, many GPs will just go along with what patients think is causing the problems, since IBS is primarily psychosomatic anyway.
Yes the GP told me to both times, I did not suggest it or imply it. I would not go on it if I didn't have to or was not told to. Because of another health issue I am really tired so it might be to help with that too, she didn't really explain. I don't think I can go half on it but I mean she's told me to go gluten free so I'm a bit stuck really...
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WokSz
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(Original post by pinkstudent63)
Thanks, I'll see if I can make some for uni, although I eat soup with bread so I still need to find a nice bread recipe! I would love to make more meals from scratch, it's just finding really nice recipes
Absolutely. Have you considered fixing an appointment with a nutritionist? I know it's expensive, but I did that. I paid £300 for five appointments and had a meal plan done for me. Otherwise, there's plenty of information available on bbc.com/food
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Rat_Bag
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(Original post by OU Student)
You can only get that if it's been proven that gluten is causing the problem.
Indeed, which is why I am pressing the issue. The majority of people who are on gluten free diets don't have a medical reason to be on them.

If the GP is saying the OP should be on a gluten free diet, then the GP should be doing so for a proven medical reason. My fear is that the GP is falling into quackery and advising things without medical reason.

The OP should ask the GP for gluten free ingredients on prescription. If the GP cannot provide them on prescription, then there is no medical reason for the OP to follow a gluten free diet.
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Rat_Bag
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(Original post by pinkstudent63)
Yes the GP told me to both times, I did not suggest it or imply it. I would not go on it if I didn't have to or was not told to. Because of another health issue I am really tired so it might be to help with that too, she didn't really explain. I don't think I can go half on it but I mean she's told me to go gluten free so I'm a bit stuck really...
You should ask the GP for the reason. And you should say if it is medically indicated, then you should be provided with a prescription for gluten free products. If the GP cannot provide such a prescription, then unfortunately, you GP is just following populist quackery and advising you on things that aren't medically indicated.
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Tiger Rag
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(Original post by Rat_Bag)
Indeed, which is why I am pressing the issue. The majority of people who are on gluten free diets don't have a medical reason to be on them.

If the GP is saying the OP should be on a gluten free diet, then the GP should be doing so for a proven medical reason. My fear is that the GP is falling into quackery and advising things without medical reason.

The OP should ask the GP for gluten free ingredients on prescription. If the GP cannot provide them on prescription, then there is no medical reason for the OP to follow a gluten free diet.
It doesn't work like that. I'm meant to be on a wheat free diet. But because it can't be proven that is the problem, (I get less symptoms if I avoid wheat) I can't get food on prescription. You can only get the food on prescription after a blood test and biopsy.
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Rat_Bag
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(Original post by OU Student)
It doesn't work like that.
I know. It's why I am labouring this point.

(Original post by OU Student)
I'm meant to be on a wheat free diet.
Says who?

(Original post by OU Student)
But because it can't be proven that is the problem, (I get less symptoms if I avoid wheat) I can't get food on prescription.
Wheat may not be the problem. Non-Coeliac gluten sensitivity, is now coming to be seen as a form of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), which is largely a psychological condition, with wheat/gluten not having any physical effect on the body, but the thought that wheat/gluten is harmful, causing somatisation of symptoms. This disorder has exploded as "gluten-free" diets are becoming more faddish and (erroneously) viewed as more healthy. The same that self-diagnosed "lactose intolerance" is becoming less common, as the "dairy is evil and harmful" message is being replaced by "gluten/wheat is evil and harmful".

(Original post by OU Student)
You can only get the food on prescription after a blood test and biopsy.
Indeed, when it is proven there is a physical cause. Most if not all other types of "gluten intolerance" are just in peoples heads

And by the way, I don't think anybody (Coeliac or not) should be getting gluten-free products on prescription. It's a total waste of taxpayers' money, since nobody needs to eat gluten containing products
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ColinJarecky
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Nowadays many shops offen gluten free products, do do not worry. Try something, it tastes good
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Chlo316
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Hi there! I've been diagnosed with celiac disease for 1 and a half years now and I've found that if you're sturrgling to get used to the bread then it's best to go for naturally gluten free grains like rice or find pastas made of quinoa or brown rice. Other meal ideas include chilli con carne or chicken with chips. Sticking to naturally gluten free alternatives will keep the cost down.
Also in defence of getting gluten free staples on perception, you have to remember that there are no drugs that a celiac can take to help their condition, the diet is the medication. getting a few staples on precription massively helps with keeping the costs down considering how expensive gluten free products are compared to their gluten containing counter parts. Also over 18s actually have to pay for precriptions so they're not getting it completely for free anyway
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pineneedles
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(Original post by pinkstudent63)
Hello,

My doctor has told me to go back on a gluten free diet but it's expensive and doesn't taste good so I was wondering what everyone else does? Any coupon websites, deal websites and recipes (including bread that tastes and seems like normal 5050 bread) will be great too Thank you in advance!
I've been gluten free in the past as part of a low FODMAP diet. Breakfast and lunch seem to be the most difficult meals to manage when you're gluten free, as you typically eat cereals and bread here.
I found it more helpful to look for alternatives rather than replacements where I could because it's far less expensive and easier to get used to.
Bread was the one thing I couldn't find a good alternative for - I tried rice cakes but found them disgusting. However, I tried quite a few different brands (Genius etc) and I found the nicest was Tesco's gluten free range:
http://www.tesco.com/groceries/produ.../?id=276605133

This exact one, if you go looking for it you'll probably find another one in really weird packaging that I haven't tried.

The price isn't awful either. When its toasted, you can't even tell its gluten free imo.

For breakfast or whatever you can have eggs, they're good because they're filling and just a slice of bread if you're used to having cereal. That way you don't need to get GF porridge oats or whatever.
Tesco also have a lot of offers on their gluten free cakes and stuff, which helps to make the priciness more manageable!
I don't work for Tesco, by the way.
I'll reitterate, look for alternatives rather than replacements where you can.
I'll post again later because there's more I wanted to mention but I don't have time right now, got a lesson next.
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pineneedles
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(Original post by Rat_Bag)
I know. It's why I am labouring this point.



Says who?



Wheat may not be the problem. Non-Coeliac gluten sensitivity, is now coming to be seen as a form of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), which is largely a psychological condition, with wheat/gluten not having any physical effect on the body, but the thought that wheat/gluten is harmful, causing somatisation of symptoms. This disorder has exploded as "gluten-free" diets are becoming more faddish and (erroneously) viewed as more healthy. The same that self-diagnosed "lactose intolerance" is becoming less common, as the "dairy is evil and harmful" message is being replaced by "gluten/wheat is evil and harmful".



Indeed, when it is proven there is a physical cause. Most if not all other types of "gluten intolerance" are just in peoples heads

And by the way, I don't think anybody (Coeliac or not) should be getting gluten-free products on prescription. It's a total waste of taxpayers' money, since nobody needs to eat gluten containing products
For IBS sufferers, gluten is often excluded in a trial as part of a low FODMAPS (fermentable oglio- di- mono- and poly- saccharides) diet. FODMAPS are carbohydrates which have been found in research to cause IBS symptoms in some sufferers.
This information is from an NHS leaflet.
"In the colon bacteria ferment FODMAPS, causing gas production and leading to bloating and wind. Diarrhoea may also occur as the fermentation causes an increase in the water in your stools, making them looser."
Wheat specifically contains oligosaccharides, a group of FODMAPS which can cause symptoms.
I will say though that there is a world of difference between blindly following a diet because of some misconceived idea that it's definitely healthier because the low FODMAP diet itself isn't sustainable, and carefully monitoring your symptoms when following a diet to see if it's actually suitable for you.

As far as I'm aware, only coeliacs are eligible to receive gluten free foods on prescription. Considering the prices of gluten free foods, it may not be possible for every single person who has coeliac disease to afford enough food they can actually eat. Just think about the sheer amount of food that contains gluten.
Arguably, compliance with avoiding gluten would likely decrease if people don't receive enough financial support in regards to this, which simply costs the NHS more as they are forced to treat a higher number of people with subsequent complications such as malnutrition, osteoporosis, iron deficiency, infertility and miscarriage.
Personally I believe the amount people get on prescription should decrease, but allowing people nothing isn't the answer either.
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