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    (Original post by blissy)
    Aboot (I have seen SOuth Park you see)
    That's a bit of an exageration. Most Canadians don't pronounce about that way. However, true Canadians pronounce certain words in a more British way but there's so much American influence that you now hear the American pronounciation even more. Words like "Zed" (instead of the American "Zee"). They say "Router"(Rooter) instead of Rowter etc. Can't think of other examples
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    (Original post by SamTheMan)
    Well I can't tell the difference and I spent two years on the continent. Although I can often tell if someone definetely is not Canadian but it's more in the manner of talking than the actual accent (Americans have this self-assured, bossy way of talking and they mumble more than Canadians).
    In the Maritimes, it's much easier to distinguish the accent. There's no way you can take a Newfoundland accent for an American accent. It sounds almost like a mix of Irish and Welsh.
    Within the US, you probably have more differences between the accents than between an average Canadian accent and an average Washington D.C. accent: New York, Boston, Chesapeake, well those are the ones I heard most, and they have some many weird and funky accents in New England.
    aye - newfoundlanders apparently hold the tongue of colonial north americans of 300 years ago,

    with the US, the most english accents are in Chesapeake and Roanoke - and a lot of New England where they're more reserved and English like,

    also, it is the fault of Noah Webster, the first American lexicographer who spelt words differently for the American dictionary, thus inducing certain words to be enunciated differently
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    in a lot of places such as Germantown, you get a lot of german sounding American English and around the old Swedish colony of Christina you get a lot of scandanavian sounding American English
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    (Original post by SamTheMan)
    That's a bit of an exageration. Most Canadians don't pronounce about that way. However, true Canadians pronounce certain words in a more British way but there's so much American influence that you now hear the American pronounciation even more. Words like "Zed" (instead of the American "Zee"). They say "Router"(Rooter) instead of Rowter etc. Can't think of other examples
    Not in some cases - I have met girls from Newfoundland and New Brunswick and the way they pronounce it is hilarious! But they thought our accents were funny too
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    Not in some cases - I have met girls from Newfoundland and New Brunswick and the way they pronounce it is hilarious! But they thought our accents were funny too

    Newfoundland was a British colony until 1949, so their British influence in their tongue must still be quite fresh
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    (Original post by John Paul Jones)
    in a lot of places such as Germantown, you get a lot of german sounding American English and around the old Swedish colony of Christina you get a lot of scandanavian sounding American English
    People often joke about how people from Minnesota pronounce the name of the state "Minnisotaaa" in a kind of Scandinavian way.

    As for Newfoundland, apparently you just have to say the name Newfoundland for them to see if you're a true Newfie. It's pronounced NewFoondLend or something like that

    I'm not sure about the comment that Newfoundland has an accent like Colonial America. Colonial America was basically a lot of English, Scottish, Germans, Swiss mercenaries... The Newfie accent has a strong Irish influence which only appeared in America roughly 150 years ago.
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    Not in some cases - I have met girls from Newfoundland and New Brunswick and the way they pronounce it is hilarious! But they thought our accents were funny too
    There's nothing worse than a French speaker from New Brunswick. It's probably like an American from Ohio who's hearing the Scottish accent for the first time.
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    (Original post by SamTheMan)
    People often joke about how people from Minnesota pronounce the name of the state "Minnisotaaa" in a kind of Scandinavian way.

    As for Newfoundland, apparently you just have to say the name Newfoundland for them to see if you're a true Newfie. It's pronounced NewFoondLend or something like that

    I'm not sure about the comment that Newfoundland has an accent like Colonial America. Colonial America was basically a lot of English, Scottish, Germans, Swiss mercenaries... The Newfie accent has a strong Irish influence which only appeared in America roughly 150 years ago.

    heheh cool - yes i am very interested in colonial america, the 7 years war and the war of independence, i hope to do some post-grad stuff on it, its very interesting !!

    i think Newfoundland has an amalgamation of them all - it was one of the earliest British colonies, in 1583 Sir Humphrey Gilbert visited the place and proclaimed his authority under the English queen to govern the fishing camps there which were : french, basque, portugues and English
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    (Original post by SamTheMan)
    There's nothing worse than a French speaker from New Brunswick. It's probably like an American from Ohio who's hearing the Scottish accent for the first time.
    Some people get on at me for my accent, saying I am too posh, it really does get quite annoying.
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    (Original post by John Paul Jones)
    heheh cool - yes i am very interested in colonial america, the 7 years war and the war of independence, i hope to do some post-grad stuff on it, its very interesting !!

    i think Newfoundland has an amalgamation of them all - it was one of the earliest British colonies, in 1583 Sir Humphrey Gilbert visited the place and proclaimed his authority under the English queen to govern the fishing camps there which were : french, basque, portugues and English
    Well apparently, by the 18th century, 2/3 of the population of Newfoundland was Irish Roman Catholic.
    I'm going to say something a bit controversial but I find it kind of annoying that the Irish are so interested in their diaspora: there are 40 million Irish Americans and strong influences in certain Canadian provinces, in Australia etc. but refuse to accept that they were part of British colonialism because it's not so politically correct.
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    (Original post by SamTheMan)
    Well apparently, by the 18th century, 2/3 of the population of Newfoundland was Irish Roman Catholic.
    I'm going to say something a bit controversial but I find it kind of annoying that the Irish are so interested in their diaspora: there are 40 million Irish Americans and strong influences in certain Canadian provinces, in Australia etc. but refuse to accept that they were part of British colonialism because it's not so politically correct.
    yes they were a great part of British colonialism - by 1845, the famine was in great swing - and Peel's government gave them cheap trips to the under-populated colonies of old United Empire loyalists who escaped the original 13 colonies after the revolution,

    colonialism was a way of getting rid of the poor, and pretty much unwanted population from famined ireland and inner slums of the industrial cities
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    (Original post by John Paul Jones)
    yes they were a great part of British colonialism - by 1845, the famine was in great swing - and Peel's government gave them cheap trips to the under-populated colonies of old United Empire loyalists who escaped the original 13 colonies after the revolution,

    colonialism was a way of getting rid of the poor, and pretty much unwanted population from famined ireland and inner slums of the industrial cities
    Yes but there's more to Irish participation in colonialism that the potato famine. A lot left Ireland way before then because of opportunities to make money just as many other British citizens did at the time.
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    (Original post by imasillynarb)
    Bum, Legs, Abs, arms or face?

    ....requested by F.poste.
    backs are the sexiest bit!
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    Eyes. always eyes.

    Windows to the soul don't you know!
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    Purely physical features, hmm, height I like a guy I can look up to. Eyes that have a twinkle to them, a smile that melts my heart, a voice that can make my knees go weak, I could go on and on, lol, soppy bugga aint I
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    Eyes, bums, and a good sense of humor
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    a bit taller than me, medium build, great smile, sparkle white teeth, intellectual, have their own style, things they wear is really important too. the way they talk, and the things they like.....
    and the list goes on and on
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    (Original post by imasillynarb)
    Bum, Legs, Abs, arms or face?

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    Face. I'm a sucker for sharp cheekbones, and messy longish dark hair. Nice eyes are quite a bonus too.
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    Tall, slim, nice face and nice eyes (i like blue)
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    (Original post by imasillynarb)
    Bum, Legs, Abs, arms or face?

    ....requested by F.poste.

    for me its the face and abs.
    I like a guy whose tall, but not skinny or muscly, but inbetween. He should have good thighs, and a nice tight abs. But the most important is the face, with dark hair and light eyes
    Looks isnt all important, its the personality i mainly go for and the charm. Cos I love romantic guys.
 
 
 
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