Gentrification genuine cause for concern or not? Watch

Bill_Gates
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So it's currently a major issue in London and many other cities across the world and the rest of the UK.

Is it something we should be genuinely concerned about? communities being displaced due to the nature of how a city "develops". In respect to recent "protests" at the cereal killer cafe.

Has your area been influenced?
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Bill_Gates
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Cereal Killer Cafe incident: "Local" residents annoyed since they don't have the disposable income to pay £3-£5 for a bowl of cereal.
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Gears265
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You can tell someone does not have a job when they violently protest like this. People like this and the rioters in previous years should be shown true brute force.
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the bear
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i am fine with "gentrification". however if someone owns more than two houses they should be taxed heavily.
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TurboCretin
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'Gentrification' isn't the issue; speculation on London property is the issue. To an extent it's right to say that people do not have a right to live in a particular area, but when rents across London are becoming unaffordable on most London salaries, I think there is a legitimate argument for the Government to act.

The Government has responded by saying that new developments have to feature a certain proportion of 'affordable housing' at discounted rent. To me, that seems like window dressing.
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Rakas21
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I like gentrified areas. People should have some class.

Stop buying 10 pints in the pub and have a nice evening at the winery.
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Bill_Gates
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(Original post by the bear)
i am fine with "gentrification". however if someone owns more than two houses they should be taxed heavily.
lol erm ok. House builder? If you say individuals only they will just set themselves up as businesses.
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Bill_Gates
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(Original post by TurboCretin)
'Gentrification' isn't the issue; speculation on London property is the issue. To an extent it's right to say that people do not have a right to live in a particular area, but when rents across London are becoming unaffordable on most London salaries, I think there is a legitimate argument for the Government to act.

The Government has responded by saying that new developments have to feature a certain proportion of 'affordable housing' at discounted rent. To me, that seems like window dressing.
I don't see cause for Government to intervene yet personally. You can always commute longer hours. You have to acknowledge if an employer can't find someone for 30k in London they will have to up their salary or buy housing themselves (Like some firms are doing notably for grads).
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TurboCretin
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(Original post by Bill_Gates)
I don't see cause for Government to intervene yet personally. You can always commute longer hours. You have to acknowledge if an employer can't find someone for 30k in London they will have to up their salary or buy housing themselves (Like some firms are doing notably for grads).
You also have to acknowledge that if someone wishes to survive, they have to find a job - even if that job barely covers their cost of living. The pressure applies in both directions. And I'm not really talking about grads here, I'm talking about support roles, cleaners, refuse collectors etc. These people are on salaries for which the cost of commuting swallows the cost benefits of living further out. Because, guess what, our transport is also far too expensive.

London needs these people - there is a clear impetus for protecting their survival in London.
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TurboCretin
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(Original post by Bill_Gates)
lol erm ok. House builder? If you say individuals only they will just set themselves up as businesses.
To be fair, HMRC already has well-established anti-avoidance frameworks in place to see through schemes like this.
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Bill_Gates
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(Original post by TurboCretin)
To be fair, HMRC already has well-established anti-avoidance frameworks in place to see through schemes like this.
They don't you can do it. You just need to pay the taxes due before you do it.
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Gears265
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(Original post by Rakas21)
I like gentrified areas. People should have some class.

Stop buying 10 pints in the pub and have a nice evening at the winery.
Posh boys 😴
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Rakas21
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(Original post by Gears265)
Posh boys 😴
Ironically I come from the underclass. I just don't act or speak like it.
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Rakas21
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(Original post by Bill_Gates)
lol erm ok. House builder? If you say individuals only they will just set themselves up as businesses.
I always find it strange when people complain about housing but rail against those providing the rentable stock.

(Original post by Bill_Gates)
I don't see cause for Government to intervene yet personally. You can always commute longer hours. You have to acknowledge if an employer can't find someone for 30k in London they will have to up their salary or buy housing themselves (Like some firms are doing notably for grads).
Back in the Victorian times it was actually commonplace for employers to own the surrounding homes for their workers.
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Bill_Gates
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(Original post by Rakas21)
I always find it strange when people complain about housing but rail against those providing the rentable stock.



Back in the Victorian times it was actually commonplace for employers to own the surrounding homes for their workers.
Bournville in Birmingham is a great example however it all comes down to profit now.
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Bill_Gates
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(Original post by Gears265)
You can tell someone does not have a job when they violently protest like this. People like this and the rioters in previous years should be shown true brute force.
Most of them were employed apparently. Key sector workers such as teachers, councils etc.
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scrotgrot
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(Original post by Bill_Gates)
I don't see cause for Government to intervene yet personally. You can always commute longer hours. You have to acknowledge if an employer can't find someone for 30k in London they will have to up their salary or buy housing themselves (Like some firms are doing notably for grads).
Firms are buying up housing for grads?
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Bill_Gates
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(Original post by scrotgrot)
Firms are buying up housing for grads?
A few large firms have in London (Cheaper parts). They are obviously rented out to the grads at market rates (sometimes slightly below just like Universities). It's just to make sure they have somewhere to stay.

Starbucks will offer £1000 towards deposits for new employees soon.
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scrotgrot
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(Original post by Rakas21)
I always find it strange when people complain about housing but rail against those providing the rentable stock.
If such a law was introduced and they sold up, the houses wouldn't disappear: on balance, they'd be bought by the tenants.
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Bill_Gates
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(Original post by scrotgrot)
If such a law was introduced and they sold up, the houses wouldn't disappear: on balance, they'd be bought by the tenants.
Not always the case. Especially in already deprived areas which account for the majority of the rental stock.
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