Mathsandphysftw
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#1
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I have just started year 12 and am doing maths, further maths, chemistry and physics. I'm finding it easy and am trying to find a new topic to learn as C1 is boring.I would also rather this topic not be on the a level syllabus as if i already know it when we come to learn it as a class i shall be bored again. so if anyone has got any ideas about what to learn they'd be most appreciated
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jsMath
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Try to learn euclidean geometry, i read few of the alevel maths pass papers and i found out some questions rely on euclidean geometry, that may secure an A* for you.
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(Original post by Mathsandphysftw)
I have just started year 12 and am doing maths, further maths, chemistry and physics. I'm finding it easy and am trying to find a new topic to learn as C1 is boring.I would also rather this topic not be on the a level syllabus as if i already know it when we come to learn it as a class i shall be bored again. so if anyone has got any ideas about what to learn they'd be most appreciated
Perhaps learn some basic Number Theory? There is pretty much none on the A Level syllabus. NRICH have an "An introduction to Number Theory" article here:
https://nrich.maths.org/4352
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MattyJMP
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(Original post by jsMath)
Try to learn euclidean geometry, i read few of the alevel maths pass papers and i found out some questions rely on euclidean geometry, that may secure an A* for you.
Do you mean non-Euclidean? Euclidean is just, well, geometry... Geometries of surfaces on a sphere are pretty interesting though
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jsMath
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(Original post by MattyJMP)
Do you mean non-Euclidean? Euclidean is just, well, geometry... Geometries of surfaces on a sphere are pretty interesting though
True that is a good idea, but i was telling him to read topics related and hidden in his alevel tests, in order not to confuse himself.
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Mathsandphysftw
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That article on number theory seems very interesting, i shall definitely look into that.Non- Euclidean geometry is very interesting to say the least. But isn't that covered in fp2/3 when using hyperbolic trigonometric functions?
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Luke Kostanjsek
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(Original post by Mathsandphysftw)
I have just started year 12 and am doing maths, further maths, chemistry and physics. I'm finding it easy and am trying to find a new topic to learn as C1 is boring.I would also rather this topic not be on the a level syllabus as if i already know it when we come to learn it as a class i shall be bored again. so if anyone has got any ideas about what to learn they'd be most appreciated
Don't know what syllabus you're on, so not sure whether this is covered in your further maths pure modules, but Group Theory is super super interesting and doesn't really require any prior knowledge beyond decent algebra. It'll be like no other maths you've ever done before. Also, google Banach-Tarski paradox if you want any more proof that group theory is awesome
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jsMath
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If interested read the following thread on MVC

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...1#post58613761
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jsMath
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If you are interested in number theory follow this thread

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...1#post59573941

There are many interesting topics in Maths.

If you want to master many topics in maths then learn beside calculus, linear algebra
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aamirac
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What about some STEP papers? I hear they can be a bit of a challenge that you can try.
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Mathsandphysftw
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Wow that Banach-Tarski paradox seems very counter intuitive, it flies in the face of conventional geometric reasoning but i guess thats why they call it a paradox it also seems, as you've said, fairly accessible without huge amounts of preparatory reading.
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Mathsandphysftw
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(Original post by aamirac)
What about some STEP papers? I hear they can be a bit of a challenge that you can try.
I have done a few step questions before and they are challenging but most require knowledge from C3/4 and above so my selection of questions is very narrow
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Luke Kostanjsek
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(Original post by Mathsandphysftw)
Wow that Banach-Tarski paradox seems very counter intuitive, it flies in the face of conventional geometric reasoning but i guess thats why they call it a paradox it also seems, as you've said, fairly accessible without huge amounts of preparatory reading.
I know right, it's mad when you first see it. This website does a really good job of explaining it in layman's terms http://www.irregularwebcomic.net/2339.html

That's what first got me interested in group theory. And if you want an introduction to actual group theory, this is a great website http://dogschool.tripod.com/groups.html
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snmk1234
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D2 is very interesting with the game theory and quite relevant maths.
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Mathsandphysftw
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(Original post by Luke Kostanjsek)
I know right, it's mad when you first see it. This website does a really good job of explaining it in layman's terms http://www.irregularwebcomic.net/2339.html

That's what first got me interested in group theory. And if you want an introduction to actual group theory, this is a great website http://dogschool.tripod.com/groups.html
I have read the explanation of the paradox and it was very interesting and will require some more thought to get to grips with. Thanks for the links guys!
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ETbuymilkandeggs
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Chaos theory is really interesting. So is the Banack-Tarski paradox. What I would recommend doing is going to an education science/maths YouTube video, watching a few videos with interesting titles, then learning the topics you find interesting in-depth.

Some of the channels I can think of:

- VSauce
- Numberphile
- Computerphile
- Minute Physics
- In a nutshell
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Euclidean
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(Original post by snmk1234)
D2 is very interesting with the game theory and quite relevant maths.
I agree with D2 ^
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