Real Marriage a thing of the past?

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Poll: Real marriage a thing of the past?
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username2176541
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These days
Last edited by username2176541; 1 year ago
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Scienceisgood
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The point of marriage outside of religion is?...

To me, marriage if you're not religious is more of a status symbol rather than anything else. Why would you need a piece of paper stating "I am in a lifelong legal partnership with this person"?
To me, I don't see the point in marriage. =l
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username2176541
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(Original post by Scienceisgood)
The point of marriage outside of religion is?...

To me, marriage if you're not religious is more of a status symbol rather than anything else. Why would you need a piece of paper stating "I am in a lifelong legal partnership with this person"?
To me, I don't see the point in marriage. =l
I agree with you its something that should be independent of the state and religion. I also agree that people see it as a status symbol which absurd. A piece of paper doesn't define your love for someone nor their love for you. Its difficult to phrase this but when you really love someone none of this bureaucracy should matter. It is truly a sad time when a bond between 2 people in society has been reduced to such bureaucracy.
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PQ
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I think your understanding of what marriage used to be is flawed. It has always been a contract.

http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-histor...e-alex-gendler might be a decent starting point.
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frozen_fire
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I think you raise a good point regarding the divorce rate which apparently stands at 42% in the UK. What this shows is that perhaps people are rushing into marriage these days and have a lower tolerence for indifference in relationships. Society now regards multiple marriages to be closer to the norm so people don't have such a desire for commitment when the likelihood is that they will always be able to find someone else.
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troubadour.
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(Original post by Scienceisgood)
The point of marriage outside of religion is?...

To me, marriage if you're not religious is more of a status symbol rather than anything else. Why would you need a piece of paper stating "I am in a lifelong legal partnership with this person"?
To me, I don't see the point in marriage. =l
For the tax breaks. :lol:
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TheCitizenAct
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Much like personality, there is no such thing as 'love.' It's a manufactured, man-made concept which aids people in feeling better about themselves when they have to analyse the true nature of most relationships: need. She needs security (financial or otherwise), to feel wanted, or to feel attractive, and he needs sex (she merely wants it). If the man has no money, there can be no 'love.' If the woman isn't attractive enough, there can be no 'love.'

All 'love', and by extension marriage, is predicated on the fulfilment of self-interest. Then again, that doesn't make it a bad thing. When we pursue what we want the most, more often than not it results in beneficial outcomes for wider society.

Western civilisation lives to question everything, and rightly so. However, it will question itself into decimation. Marriage is more than just a legal contract; it has many wider social implications. It affords children a more stable home and childhood, it makes men slightly more civilised and it makes women slightly more secure. When it's backed up by an absolute morality - Christianity - it's respected as an institution and it's worked on, it isn't just, as it is today, discarded.

I don't believe in God; I hate religion. However, I recognise that a society formed around an absolute morality is FAR stronger than a western society formed around the privatisation of morality, or the individual's interpretation of what's right or wrong. It's why Islam will outlive all of us, and, inevitably, even hundreds of years from now, prevail in The UK.

There ideas may be moronic, they may be misogynistic and they may even be barbaric, but they believe in something more than themselves, and their conviction to their morality is unwavering. By contrast, western civilisation will tear any conceptualisation of an absolute morality to pieces, and find its final resting place upon the only shrine anyone worships before these days: identity and self.
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PQ
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(Original post by TheCitizenAct)
Much like personality, there is no such thing as 'love.' It's a manufactured, man-made concept which aids people in feeling better about themselves when they have to analyse the true nature of most relationships: need. She needs security (financial or otherwise), to feel wanted, or to feel attractive, and he needs sex (she merely wants it). If the man has no money, there can be no 'love.' If the woman isn't attractive enough, there can be no 'love.'

All 'love', and by extension marriage, is predicated on the fulfilment of self-interest. Then again, that doesn't make it a bad thing. When we pursue what we want the most, more often than not it results in beneficial outcomes for wider society.

Western civilisation lives to question everything, and rightly so. However, it will question itself into decimation. Marriage is more than just a legal contract; it has many wider social implications. It affords children a more stable home and childhood, it makes men slightly more civilised and it makes women slightly more secure. When it's backed up by an absolute morality - Christianity - it's respected as an institution and it's worked on, it isn't just, as it is today, discarded.

I don't believe in God; I hate religion. However, I recognise that a society formed around an absolute morality is FAR stronger than a western society formed around the privatisation of morality, or the individual's interpretation of what's right or wrong. It's why Islam will outlive all of us, and, inevitably, even hundreds of years from now, prevail in The UK.

There ideas may be moronic, they may be misogynistic and they may even be barbaric, but they believe in something more than themselves, and their conviction to their morality is unwavering. By contrast, western civilisation will tear any conceptualisation of an absolute morality to pieces, and find its final resting place upon the only shrine anyone worships before these days: identity and self.
You ok hun?
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TaintedLight
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#9
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I see marriage as an assurance to the spouse that everything about you is likeable and lovable.

It's assurance to the entire world as well.

But with the divorce rates increasing I think this kind of an "institution" is fast fading away.
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TheCitizenAct
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(Original post by PQ)
You ok hun?
Does engaging in condescension make you feel better about yourself?
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arcenciel21
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(Original post by TheCitizenAct)
Much like personality, there is no such thing as 'love.' It's a manufactured, man-made concept which aids people in feeling better about themselves when they have to analyse the true nature of most relationships: need. She needs security (financial or otherwise), to feel wanted, or to feel attractive, and he needs sex (she merely wants it). If the man has no money, there can be no 'love.' If the woman isn't attractive enough, there can be no 'love.'

All 'love', and by extension marriage, is predicated on the fulfilment of self-interest. Then again, that doesn't make it a bad thing. When we pursue what we want the most, more often than not it results in beneficial outcomes for wider society.

Western civilisation lives to question everything, and rightly so. However, it will question itself into decimation. Marriage is more than just a legal contract; it has many wider social implications. It affords children a more stable home and childhood, it makes men slightly more civilised and it makes women slightly more secure. When it's backed up by an absolute morality - Christianity - it's respected as an institution and it's worked on, it isn't just, as it is today, discarded.

I don't believe in God; I hate religion. However, I recognise that a society formed around an absolute morality is FAR stronger than a western society formed around the privatisation of morality, or the individual's interpretation of what's right or wrong. It's why Islam will outlive all of us, and, inevitably, even hundreds of years from now, prevail in The UK.

There ideas may be moronic, they may be misogynistic and they may even be barbaric, but they believe in something more than themselves, and their conviction to their morality is unwavering. By contrast, western civilisation will tear any conceptualisation of an absolute morality to pieces, and find its final resting place upon the only shrine anyone worships before these days: identity and self.
get help hun
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username2176541
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(Original post by TheCitizenAct)
Much like personality, there is no such thing as 'love.' It's a manufactured, man-made concept which aids people in feeling better about themselves when they have to analyse the true nature of most relationships: need. She needs security (financial or otherwise), to feel wanted, or to feel attractive, and he needs sex (she merely wants it). If the man has no money, there can be no 'love.' If the woman isn't attractive enough, there can be no 'love.'

All 'love', and by extension marriage, is predicated on the fulfilment of self-interest. Then again, that doesn't make it a bad thing. When we pursue what we want the most, more often than not it results in beneficial outcomes for wider society.

Western civilisation lives to question everything, and rightly so. However, it will question itself into decimation. Marriage is more than just a legal contract; it has many wider social implications. It affords children a more stable home and childhood, it makes men slightly more civilised and it makes women slightly more secure. When it's backed up by an absolute morality - Christianity - it's respected as an institution and it's worked on, it isn't just, as it is today, discarded.

I don't believe in God; I hate religion. However, I recognise that a society formed around an absolute morality is FAR stronger than a western society formed around the privatisation of morality, or the individual's interpretation of what's right or wrong. It's why Islam will outlive all of us, and, inevitably, even hundreds of years from now, prevail in The UK.

There ideas may be moronic, they may be misogynistic and they may even be barbaric, but they believe in something more than themselves, and their conviction to their morality is unwavering. By contrast, western civilisation will tear any conceptualisation of an absolute morality to pieces, and find its final resting place upon the only shrine anyone worships before these days: identity and self.
Love is not manufactured or man made. it clearly is a biological response that has allowed the human race to survive. Please explain how it is manufactured. You seem to be regurgitating a lot of preconceived ideas without actually conceiving any of your own.
This biological response often develops into an emotional response a sort of attachment to the person you love. The word love may be man made but the actual noun it is used to call is not man made. Just like trees are man-made because they are called 'trees' your logic is flawed. You need to re-evaluate your points.
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TheCitizenAct
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(Original post by Xenon17)
Love is not manufactured or man made. it clearly is a biological response that has allowed the human race to survive. Please explain how it is manufactured. You seem to be regurgitating a lot of preconceived ideas without actually conceiving any of your own.
This biological response often develops into an emotional response a sort of attachment to the person you love. The word love may be man made but the actual noun it is used to call is not man made. Just like trees are man-made because they are called 'trees' your logic is flawed. You need to re-evaluate your points.
Which biological response are you referring to which medical professionals would conceptualise as 'love'?

Of course love is man made. It was designed largely to afford security to women who, all throughout history, have had a claim to their husband's wealth; 'love' merely helps legitimise that claim in vernacular which sounds more well meaning than cold, calculated self-interest.

It's not a spectacularly revolutionary claim. It's just a simple reflection on reality. Love, as people speak of it, is different things to different people. Therefore, it's not 'anything.'

For 'love' as many people conceptualise it (sacrifice, or the absence of self-interest) to exist between beings, it would have to exist between beings who lack the capacity to pursue their own self-interest - all human beings are self-interested, our entire existence is predicated on self-interest (capitalism).

You never do anything which isn't in your own self-interest; everything you do, everyone you 'love', is merely geared around what you need as an individual. Once the person you 'love' stops fulfilling that need, 'love' evaporates.
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TheCitizenAct
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(Original post by arcenciel21)
get help hun
Get real, hun. It never fails to amaze me how our race (i.e., the human race) has an infinite capacity for self delusion.
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username2176541
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(Original post by TheCitizenAct)
Get real, hun. It never fails to amaze me how our race (i.e., the human race) has an infinite capacity for self delusion.


(Original post by TheCitizenAct)
Which biological response are you referring to which medical professionals would conceptualise as 'love'?

Of course love is man made. It was designed largely to afford security to women who, all throughout history, have had a claim to their husband's wealth; 'love' merely helps legitimise that claim in vernacular which sounds more well meaning than cold, calculated self-interest.

It's not a spectacularly revolutionary claim. It's just a simple reflection on reality. Love, as people speak of it, is different things to different people. Therefore, it's not 'anything.'

For 'love' as many people conceptualise it (sacrifice, or the absence of self-interest) to exist between beings, it would have to exist between beings who lack the capacity to pursue their own self-interest - all human beings are self-interested, our entire existence is predicated on self-interest (capitalism).

You never do anything which isn't in your own self-interest; everything you do, everyone you 'love', is merely geared around what you need as an individual. Once the person you 'love' stops fulfilling that need, 'love' evaporates.

Here you go

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biological_basis_of_love


I hope you change your outlook on life before you realise its too late.
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PQ
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(Original post by TheCitizenAct)
Does engaging in condescension make you feel better about yourself?
Do you often interpret expressions of concern as attacks?
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username2176541
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(Original post by PQ)
Do you often interpret expressions of concern as attacks?

He is deluding himself that he is rational when in fact he isn't. He is feeling annoyance that his dependence on his belief is being challenged. He is attempting to deny it and feels some self-doubt. Hopefully he will realise he is a human just like everyone else not a robot or 'terminator'.


(Original post by TheCitizenAct)
Get real, hun. It never fails to amaze me how our race (i.e., the human race) has an infinite capacity for self delusion.
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BefuddledPenguin
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Marriage is really all about the wedding and nothing more, rates of marriage have decreased as weddings have become more lavish and expensive. The religious element doesn't really matter, in Scotland Humanist weddings are among the most popular, almost on par with the Church of Scotland.
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TheCitizenAct
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(Original post by Xenon17)
Here you go

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biological_basis_of_love


I hope you change your outlook on life before you realise its too late.
Change what outlook? It isn't an 'outlook', it's just an observable fact. Since when have you known anyone to do anything that wasn't geared around what they need (their own self-interest)? Give me an example.

I don't want a link. Anyone can post a link. I want to know what you think. You claim it exists, I claim it's manufactured. History is on my side - from the Greeks to the Catholics, everyone had a shareholding in 'love.'
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troubadour.
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(Original post by Xenon17)
Here you go

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biological_basis_of_love


I hope you change your outlook on life before you realise its too late.
I wouldn't count on it. See here.

You're not gonna get anywhere with this one. I just hit 'Mark as read' anytime he quotes me now.
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