Boredomstrikes
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#1
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#1
I've always been interested in Psychiatry because I really want to be a doctor and the minds of people really interest me. I just wanted to know 1) If the perception of psychiatrists is really that bad by the general public and other doctors? 2)How effective is psychiatric care generally? 3) The exact kind of things Psychiatrists deal with?
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nexttime
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#2
Report 6 years ago
#2
1) I don't think so? Its not very competitive within medicine, but that's because it can be a bit of a niche interest and yet needs loads of doctors. I'd argue its only a good thing - you can almost choose where you live, have easier choice of sub-speciality, etc.

2) Its an evidence-based field like the rest of medicine and plays a vital role in keeping both patients and the general public safe. Its a far cry from a GP treating a chest infection in a 5 minute appointment - it generally calls for far more extensive contact and improvement over weeks and months, not hours and days, but that doesn't mean its less important.

3) Depression, bipolar, schizophrenia... there will surely be descriptions on google. NHS choices is often good.
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username457532
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#3
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#3
As someone who has seen 5 different psychiatrists ranging from 'almost definitely made me more ill' to 'is actually listening to the things I'm struggling with', don't go into psychiatry because 'minds are interesting'. If you're interested in mental health from an academic viewpoint go into research. People living with mental illness need sympathy and someone who cares about their recovery, not someone who is fascinated by the way their brain works. While you can test for a lot of physical illnesses through scans and blood samples, diagnosing and treating mental illness requires the patient to trust their mental health professions to believe what they feel and perceive and not to minimise or invalidate anything they tell you.
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brennanlee
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#4
Report 6 years ago
#4
my experience is that compassion, some intellect, a broad mind and genuine enthusiam/passion for psychiatry is what you need.

also- if psychiatric care is good, then it is VERY effective, take it from me. a true lifesaver for people suffering with mental illness.
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Boredomstrikes
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#5
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#5
I do have a lot of other reasons to go into Psychiatry, the one I mentioned above was just a personality trait which I have always had but I think that regardless of the specialty I would still care a lot for my patients and in Psychiatry I sure as hell wouldn't be some weird mind fanatic who wants to just open up their mind and poke around. My girlfriend has depression and social anxiety, a relative had depression, my friend has autism, adhd and tourette's, and two more friends who have anxiety disorders . I am more than aware of just how caring and sympathetic I need to be because I've been that way for quite a long time. My main reason is because I want to help them and people who suffer from mental illnesses because I've seen the way their illnesses affect them and I just want to help.
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1lastchance
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#6
Report 6 years ago
#6
As an inpatient at a psychiatric hospital and have been a patient in the comnunity I thought I'd give you an idea of my perspective of things.


1) I don’t know of any bad perspectives of psychiatrists between patients, doctors and the public. I certainly really value my psychiatrist because she has really improved my life.

2) It can take some time to get the right concoction of meds, but once the right doses and type of meds is found I’m sure it can be very fulfilling. Sometimes patients can develop resistance to a particular drug, or a patient might stop taking their meds (which I’m sure must be very frustrating for the medical team), so the psychiatrist has to juggle all of these things and I’m sure many other things as I am only a patient, so don’t know everything.

3) It tends to vary based on where you work. In the community you tend to see more patients with depression or in the hospital you tend to see more people with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders. I have schizophrenia so what treatment began in the community eventually ended up in having care in the hospital, but when I am well I will go back to having treatment in the community.
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username1236842
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#7
Report 6 years ago
#7
When I was thinking about becoming a doctor I thought i wanted to be a psychiatrist. A retired psychiatrist put me off though saying that if he went in to medicine again he'd become a GP because that is where most of the treatable psychiatric illnesses are.
As a GP about 1/3 of my work is with psychiatric problems. Mainly anxiety and depression but we're also dealing with ADHD, Tourettes OCD eating disorders, autism and schizophrenia.
Most depression and anxiety is managed by GPs with referrals to psychologists not psychiatrists if they need CBT.
Our psychiatrist largely does diagnosis when we're not sure if something's a personality disorder or depression or if someone is bipolar or just has mood swings for instance, medication advice for difficult to treat depression and looks after inpatients. He usually just sees someone a couple of times then sends them back to us for follow up..
An increasing number of psychiatrists are needed to deal with dementia with our growing elderly population.
It is an interesting speciality but isn't the job many people think it is. Most psychiatrists don't do psychotherapy, that's mainly clinical psychologists.
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