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    I am confused about a physics question.
    It says
    In which wire will the electrons have a greater drift velocity- a thick wire or a thin wire?

    My initial thought was that a thick wire would have a greater drift velocity, because of its larger cross sectional area, but then I thought about the equation I = nAvq
    Rearranging would give v = I/nAq This indicates that the cross sectional area is inversely proportional to the drift velocity, which doesn’t make sense to me.

    Can anyone help? Am I completely missing something?
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    (Original post by scarlet ibis)
    I am confused about a physics question.
    It says
    In which wire will the electrons have a greater drift velocity- a thick wire or a thin wire?

    My initial thought was that a thick wire would have a greater drift velocity, because of its larger cross sectional area, but then I thought about the equation I = nAvq
    Rearranging would give v = I/nAq This indicates that the cross sectional area is inversely proportional to the drift velocity, which doesn’t make sense to me.

    Can anyone help? Am I completely missing something?
    the thin wire will have a greater drift velocity,
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    (Original post by mathematician)
    the thin wire will have a greater drift velocity,
    what dont u understand ?
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    i tried doing it with imaginary numbers but i too got confused. With I, n, and e the same and Area varied, i got 8 then doubled the area and got 4. wudnt the drift velocity be higher if the area was doubled? someone explain this
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    (Original post by mathematician)
    the thin wire will have a greater drift velocity,

    why the thin one?
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    (Original post by scarlet ibis)
    I am confused about a physics question.
    It says
    In which wire will the electrons have a greater drift velocity- a thick wire or a thin wire?

    My initial thought was that a thick wire would have a greater drift velocity, because of its larger cross sectional area, but then I thought about the equation I = nAvq
    Rearranging would give v = I/nAq This indicates that the cross sectional area is inversely proportional to the drift velocity, which doesn’t make sense to me.

    Can anyone help? Am I completely missing something?
    No..that's right..i know it sounds odd..but that's the way it works...thin wires have greater drift velocity.

    Odd isn't it....don't worry..you don't need to understand why...just know how to work it out from the formula

    G
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    (Original post by scarlet ibis)
    I am confused about a physics question.
    It says
    In which wire will the electrons have a greater drift velocity- a thick wire or a thin wire?

    My initial thought was that a thick wire would have a greater drift velocity, because of its larger cross sectional area, but then I thought about the equation I = nAvq
    Rearranging would give v = I/nAq This indicates that the cross sectional area is inversely proportional to the drift velocity, which doesn’t make sense to me.

    Can anyone help? Am I completely missing something?
    ill try ne explaing, u can see from the equation I=nAqV, I is proprtional to the area yer?, so there fore the thicker wire will have a large current.
    ok, the thinner wire has to have the same current, as the thicker wire, so the only other variable u can change is the dift velocity.
    for the thick wire, A is high, V is low, and for the thin wire A is low and V is high, they both compensate, do u get it?
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    ok thanx
    so the thinner wire will have a greater drift velocity to compensate for its small x-sectional area. right?
    so if i just use the formula to explain it, i should be ok?
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    (Original post by scarlet ibis)
    ok thanx
    so the thinner wire will have a greater drift velocity to compensate for its small x-sectional area. right?
    so if i just use the formula to explain it, i should be ok?
    yup u got it, just write down the formula and explain it
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    cool thank you mathematician and gzftan!
 
 
 
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