Depth of Knowledge in Medicine Watch

cmfunk
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Hi, I'm a first year medic and I am still trying to get my head around the course. One thing I am struggling with is knowing how much detail we need to know. For instance on the lecture notes on enzymes it starts of with practical examples of enzyme use as drugs and in diagnosis and also goes on to talk about isoenzymes. These aspects of the notes are not mentioned in the initial learning objective for the lecture so I don't know if it is something I need to know or whether it is there just as examples...
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seaholme
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It depends on your medical school, cmfunk. We did have to know all of the details on all of the slides in our lectures, for sure. They all came up in our exams! The more obscure the more likely it was to be a 12 mark essay. Nearly melted my brain...

In the longer run, to be a doctor then of course you don't have to know this stuff. Unless you want to do enzyme research on that particular enzyme or something.

The best people to ask are those in the year above you. It's so variable between different medical schools as to what they think is important and how they examine you.
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cmfunk
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(Original post by seaholme)
It depends on your medical school, cmfunk. We did have to know all of the details on all of the slides in our lectures, for sure. They all came up in our exams! The more obscure the more likely it was to be a 12 mark essay. Nearly melted my brain...

In the longer run, to be a doctor then of course you don't have to know this stuff. Unless you want to do enzyme research on that particular enzyme or something.

The best people to ask are those in the year above you. It's so variable between different medical schools as to what they think is important and how they examine you.
It just all looks out of place. The lecture is supposed to be an introduction o enzymes, but the first few slides talk about stuff I have never heard of in such great detail!
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Brachioradialis
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Ask yourself if it's clinically relevant (truly, not indirectly), and see if you can write a question on it that would fit your past paper style. If it seems relatively easy to examine, it almost certainly will be. If not it more than likely wont, and if it does appear it shouldn't be worth a ****-tonne of marks.

If you're mapping your learning to the learning objectives you're given, you won't go far wrong. Do you have formative examinations throughout the year? These can be helpful to see if you're on the right track.
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cmfunk
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(Original post by MJK91)
Ask yourself if it's clinically relevant (truly, not indirectly), and see if you can write a question on it that would fit your past paper style. If it seems relatively easy to examine, it almost certainly will be. If not it more than likely wont, and if it does appear it shouldn't be worth a ****-tonne of marks.

If you're mapping your learning to the learning objectives you're given, you won't go far wrong. Do you have formative examinations throughout the year? These can be helpful to see if you're on the right track.
It just goes into so much detail. I could understand if it appeared in later lectures, but in the first introduction to enzyme lecture it looks out of place
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seaholme
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(Original post by cmfunk)
It just all looks out of place. The lecture is supposed to be an introduction o enzymes, but the first few slides talk about stuff I have never heard of in such great detail!
Yeah so ask somebody in the year above you. For us EVERYTHING was examinable and our questions did come from weird detailed bits. To completely repeat myself - ask!! If you want to know the real answer. If you're on a traditionally based course, just asking whether something is clinically relevant means absolutely nothing, they don't care about clinical relevance.
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TattyBoJangles
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Agreed with the above - ask someone at your uni who has experience sitting the papers.

With us, pretty much everything is examinable. If you look at a lecture slide and think 'they can't possibly ask a question on that' then it's almost guaranteed to be a ten-marker in the written exam or be worth a few marks in the multiple choice..

You may also find that detail is added in further lectures. I spend a lot of the first few weeks of term in a state of confusion as things will be mentioned but then not expanded on until later.
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