V861 - Sunday Trading Laws Revision Bill 2015 (Second Reading) Watch

Poll: Should this bill be passed into law?
As many are of the opinion, Aye (24)
60%
On the contrary, No (13)
32.5%
Abstain (3)
7.5%
This discussion is closed.
Birchington
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#1
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
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V861 - Sunday Trading Laws Revision Bill 2015 (Second Reading), TSR Liberal Party

SUNDAY TRADING LAWS REVISION BILL 2015
(Second Reading)
A Bill to repeal the Sunday Trading Laws and remove all trading hour restrictions on religious holidays whilst also outlining increased rights for workers.

BE IT ENACTED by The Queen's most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Commons in this present Parliament assembled, in accordance with the provisions of the Parliament Acts 1911 and 1949, and by the authority of the same, as follows:—

1 Repeal of restrictions on Sunday trading hours
(1) Paragraph 2(1) of Schedule 1 to the Sunday Trading Act 1994 (which restricts Sunday opening at large shops) is hereby repealed.
(2) Schedule 3 to that Act (which restricts loading and unloading at large shops on Sunday mornings) shall still apply to large shops.
(3) Shops of any size have no restriction on their trading hours so long as all provisions of this Act are met.

2 Repeal of restrictions on holiday season trading hours
(1) Section 1 of the Christmas Day (Trading) Act 2004 (which restricts Christmas Day opening at large shops) is hereby repealed.
(2) Shops of any size may elect to open on Easter Sunday.

3 Worker protections
(1) An employee at any private organisation (even non-shops) with a contract that does not explicitly grant Christmas Day and Easter Sunday as holiday are entitled to opt out of working on either day without negative consequence.
(a) An employee utilising this opt-out must inform their employer of their intention to opt-out 7 days before that day occurs, and
(i) should this employee later decide they no longer wish to opt-out, their employer is under no obligation to provide them with work on these days for the duration of their contract.
(2) An employee at a shop may opt-out of working more than 6 hours on a Sunday.
(a) An employee utilising this opt-out must inform their employer of their intention to opt-out in writing,
(i) the employer must provide the employee with their amended working hours within 28 days of receipt, and
(ii) should this employee later decide they no longer wish to opt-out, their employer is under no obligation to provide them with more than 6 hours on an Sundays for the duration of their contract.

4 Short title and extent
(1) This Act may be cited as the Sunday Trading Act (Repeal) Act 2015.
(2) This Act comes into force immediately following Royal Ascent with the exception that
(a) Section 2 of this Act shall come into force on January 1, 2016.
(3) This Act extends to England and Wales only.



NOTES
Summary
This bill lets shops open on Sundays and on religious holidays should they wish to take this option. No shops are forced to do so, and employees at shops who open for longer as a result of this Act are allowed to resist working at these extra times without any negative consequence from their employer. A very similar system is already enforced in Scotland.

In a nutshell this Act is being presented because we don't believe that arbitrary, religiously motivated restrictions on businesses and consumers have any place in a modern Britain. Businesses should be allowed to open for longer in an ever more competitive world with the vast growth in ecommerce if they wish to do so, and shouldn't be told they can't just because the Church decided that Sunday was rest day thousands of years ago. We also strongly believe in consumer empowerment, and people should be free to shop on Sundays if they want to do so. All non-shop businesses are already allowed to open as long as they want, it's about time we make that consistent whilst also protecting workers.

More detail
Section 1
This section borrows fairly heavily from the real life Sunday Trading (London Olympic Games and Paralympic Games) Act 2012. Our first section uses the exact same wording and allows shops (of any size) to open for as long as they want.

Large shops (ie: the ones already affected by Sunday Trading) are still restricted from loading and unloading at unsociable Sunday morning hours.

Section 2
This part of the Act repeals the real-life Christmas Day (Trading) Act 2004 to allow a shop to trade on Christmas Day. It then goes on to clarify that Easter Sundays are also free from restriction. Shops are not forced to open on these days. Indeed there is probably very little market for people to shop on Christmas Day especially, but the option to conduct business on these days should at least be available.

Section 3
Perhaps the most important part of this Act, it sets out the new worker protections for Sundays and religious holidays.

No shop worker is entitled to work for any longer than they already work under this Act. However if they do opt-out of working extra hours, their employer is under no obligation to allow them to opt back in. This protects any extra 'sunday workers' employed as a consequence of opt-outs from being treated unfairly like a spare part.

For the first time ever, workers from any business (even non-shops!) may opt out of working on Christmas Day or Easter Sunday so long as appropriate notice is provided. This is really the only part of the Act that applies to every worker, rather than just shop workers.



Speaker's Note: Please note the change in name from the first reading.
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Jarred
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#2
Report 3 years ago
#2
Aye; like Scotland we use this bill to remove arbitrary trading hour restrictions that most other industries (eg: restaurants) don't need to wrestle with anyway, whilst still adding in extra protections for workers as part of the extension of trading hours. I feel like we've done this bill in the fairest, least irresponsible way possible.
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James Milibanter
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#3
Report 3 years ago
#3
Aye
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SakuraCayla
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#4
Report 3 years ago
#4
Before voting I would like to hear any of the arguments against the bill from those voting no if that is okay
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Krollo
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#5
Report 3 years ago
#5
Aye. I'm sorry to go against my party on this one, but I still feel that Sunday trading laws as they are now are pointlessly arbitrary and serve no real purpose.

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Rakas21
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#6
Report 3 years ago
#6
'Abstain'.

You had an opportunity to make this great with a truly libertarian act but 1.2 and section 3 somewhat provide a needless complication to the bill.
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Birchington
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#7
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#7
Ayes to the right: 24
Noes to the left: 13
Abstain: 3

The Ayes have it! The Ayes have it. Unlock.

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