what does the natural science course lead you onto??

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Kitty1966
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Hi, im looking at doing the above course and just wondering what do you do in masters after you have done that course?
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laalNick
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(Original post by tonimaria)
Hi, im looking at doing the above course and just wondering what do you do in masters after you have done that course?
Depends on which pathway/specialism you take through the degree. Then you masters subject will depend on that. Need a bit more info.
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Urist
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As above, it depends on what you specialise in. As you'll see on the site or in the prospectus, the Natural Sciences degree branches out at stage 2 into a choice between Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Earth Science, Environmental Science, and Planetary Science. It also has a generalist option but I wouldn't recommend that. Basically how it works is that you would then study modules in that subject and your final degree will have that subject in its name, e.g. Natural Sciences (Biology). You would then be able to use that degree in the same way you would a Biology degree. The same with physics, chemistry, etc.

So your options at masters, PhD, in your career, etc. essentially rely on what you specialise in. It's also worth keeping in mind that if you want to study Physics or Planetary Science you need to study Essential Mathematics 1 (MST124) at stage 1. If you're not sure what to specialise in then I'd recommend doing MST124 since it opens up those options. I often hear that Chemistry has very good job prospects if that means much to you, but any degree in science shows a high level of numeracy, analytical ability, etc. which are valuable skills in most careers.

You should also check out Mathematics and Physics if you're planning on studying physics or planetary science. You can study most of the modules from those in addition to advanced mathematical modules, giving you accreditation by both the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications (IMA) and the Institute of Physics (IOP). It involves a mixture of Applied Mathematics modules and Physics modules. These include options in astrophysics, which makes it similar to planetary science if you want it to be.

There are also other science degrees such as Environmental Science, which is similar to Natural Sciences (Environmental Science) but requires travelling to do practical experiments, whereas the Natural Sciences version does this virtually. There is also Health Sciences, which essentially splits your modules between Biology and Psychology. I'd recommend checking out all of the various more specialised science degrees, although Natural Sciences is the most flexible by far.

Good luck!
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Kitty1966
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biomedical science im interested in and just want to make sure that it can lead me in the right direction. i also may be interested in them all as i do love science i just needed help deciding which one to choose in the path way
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laalNick
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As Urist said.

Also if want to do a particular masters at a brick uni, it's best to call up brick universities and see what they think of OU degree you are planning, or end up doing, as some might require you to do some extra/specific modules/pathway or lab experience somewhere (as OU lacks in the practicals as compared to brick sciences) if the Masters isn't purerly theoretical but it is all down to the subjects. It's also usually required to get a least a 2:1 honours classification to move onto a Masters at a brick uni although it is not impossible or rare to do one with a 2:2.

It's difficult to generalise without knowing any specifics.
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Urist
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(Original post by tonimaria)
biomedical science im interested in and just want to make sure that it can lead me in the right direction. i also may be interested in them all as i do love science i just needed help deciding which one to choose in the path way
To choose a masters from the first page of Google at random, this one at UCL (https://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-st...l-sciences-msc) requires a minimum of a 2.1 in a Biomedical Sciences (not available at the OU), Life Sciences (you could study Natural Sciences(Biology) for example) or medical degree. A lot will also say "relevant subject" to generally mean anything associated with biology, medicine or both.

If your main interest is Biomedical Sciences then the only suitable OU degrees that come to mind are Natural Sciences (Biology) and maybe Health Sciences. I'm really not too sure about this (my main interests, and degree, are Computer Science and Mathematics) but you could contact universities you are interested in studying your masters at for more details. The Open University itself may also be worth contacting but I don't know how much they'll know about other universities.

The Open University's MSc in Science (http://www.open.ac.uk/postgraduate/q...course-details) also has some options that are similar to biomedicine. It explicitly mentions "areas such as Earth Science, Brain and Behavioural Science and Medicinal Chemistry". Medicinal Chemistry may be of interest to you, and there are other medically oriented modules available.

In short, it's worth checking with universities directly to see what they think.
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mollydblybarrly
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If you want to go into Biomedical sciences then I would take the NatSci Biology route. Health Science has a lot of psychology and ethics based modules which aren't really relevant to Biomed.

If you take the Biology route you will cover Human Biology, Genetics, Cell biology, Microbiology and a little Biochemistry.

I hope this helps, I have the same career in mind as you. Also bear in mind that if you want to become a BMS actual lab based experience is worth its weight in gold. You will also have to have the degree assessed by the IBMS and take top up modules, not to mention gain HCPC registration.
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Kitty1966
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how can we get lab experience? and how do we the HCPC registration?
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laalNick
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(Original post by tonimaria)
how can we get lab experience? and how do we the HCPC registration?
Some universities offer summer lab placements for undergrads. Have a google and ask local universities too.
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mollydblybarrly
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I would apply for support worker posts, email your local hospital Labs to enquire about volunteering opportunities and yes, certainly look into placements and courses. There are a couple in London but they cost around £600.

As for HCPC registration I think (although am not certain) you have to be in employment and doing the top up modules in-lab through the IBMS. IBMS accreditation is very important if you want to work in NHS or Private clinical laboratories.
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