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edexcel physics AS on monday! watch

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    is anyone else doing edexcel physics as level on monday?
    I'm retaking unit 2! Aaargh! (got a C in it last year, which really brought my marks down cos i got an A inall the other units)
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    Yeah, i'm doing it on monday too. Is it just me, or is there not much to revise for...
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    There's quite a lot... remember all the experiments you have to know, and if you understand the concepts and can do calculations right, you're basically fine. After having done 60 pages of mechanics past paper questions alone, I can safely say there is little more to physics than those three things! (bear in mind there are quite a few experiments to learn, and some concepts are tricky, like calculations).
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    I'm doing it too. Units 1 and 2 are easy, but I'm terrified of Astrophysics.
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    yeah me too. they always have questions that even if you had the book infront of you, you wouldnt be able to do. astrophysics that is.

    im retaking unit 2 as well

    almost everyone in my school found that their lowest physics module and in many cases their lowest of all modules (including me!)

    dammit

    rosie
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    (Original post by mik1a)
    There's quite a lot... remember all the experiments you have to know, and if you understand the concepts and can do calculations right, you're basically fine. After having done 60 pages of mechanics past paper questions alone, I can safely say there is little more to physics than those three things! (bear in mind there are quite a few experiments to learn, and some concepts are tricky, like calculations).

    Ah. That reminds me. Could someone please tell me the experiment for showing that PV= constant? (gases)

    (Original post by Hash)
    Ah. That reminds me. Could someone please tell me the experiment for showing that PV= constant? (gases)
    me! me! (correct me if wrong please)

    have:

    a sort of tank with a bit of air at the top connected to e.g. a foot pump and a pressure gauge

    oil underneath the air in the tank and going into the bottom part of a narrow ish tube (of known diameter), at the top of which is trapped air, and a scale allowing the length of the air column to be read

    by pumping the foot pump you change the pressure of the trapped air and you can work out the volume from knowing the diameter and length of the air column

    plot them on a graph, the constant is the gradient



    rosie

    roll on unit 2 !
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    Boyle's Law:

    Have an upside down round flask containing air with measurements so the volume of the air can be recorded. Underneath this air have some oil and a pume linked to a pressure guage on the oil (If I remember right, you cannot have the pump going to the air, because the mass must be constant.

    Pump different quantities of air into the container, leave to settle for 30 seonds and record the pressure and corresponding volume of the air. By plotting 1/volume against the pressure, you should get a straight line throught the origin, indicating p = k/V, or pV = k, which is Boyle's law.

    Pressure Law:

    Submerge a sealed container leading to a pressure guage in water with a thermometer. Use a heater to change the temmperature of the water and therefore, after a lag time has been compensated for, the temperature of the air inside. Record the pressure on the guage. Plot the pressure against thetemperature, and plot on a graph. Yoy should get a straight line through the origin, indicating p/T = k, the Pressure law.

    Measuring the Latent heat of Fusion fo Water:

    Have some crushed ice in a funnel and put a beaker beneath to collect the volume of water melted. Set up a control, exactly the same, and in the first funnel put an electric heater with known voltage and current (measured with an ammeter and voltmeter), or known energy loss (Joulemeter). Set the heater going for 5 minutes and turn it off. Record the volume (and therefore mass) of the water melted due to the heater by subtracting the volume of water melted in the control, and use the equation:

    Q = ml, or VIt = ml (where t in this case is 300 seconds):

    to find l, the latent heat of fusion of the water.

    That's all the thermal ones I can think of... there is a tricky electricity one that always gets me to do with measuring the internal resistance, could anyone help me with that?
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    thanks!

    Can u also do it with some kind of piston?


    btw. Do we need to be able to prove all the root mean square speed stuff?? its too much to remember!
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    (Original post by mik1a)
    Boyle's Law:

    Have an upside down round flask containing air with measurements so the volume of the air can be recorded. Underneath this air have some oil and a pume linked to a pressure guage on the oil (If I remember right, you cannot have the pump going to the air, because the mass must be constant.

    Pump different quantities of air into the container, leave to settle for 30 seonds and record the pressure and corresponding volume of the air. By plotting 1/volume against the pressure, you should get a straight line throught the origin, indicating p = k/V, or pV = k, which is Boyle's law.

    Pressure Law:

    Submerge a sealed container leading to a pressure guage in water with a thermometer. Use a heater to change the temmperature of the water and therefore, after a lag time has been compensated for, the temperature of the air inside. Record the pressure on the guage. Plot the pressure against thetemperature, and plot on a graph. Yoy should get a straight line through the origin, indicating p/T = k, the Pressure law.

    Measuring the Latent heat of Fusion fo Water:

    Have some crushed ice in a funnel and put a beaker beneath to collect the volume of water melted. Set up a control, exactly the same, and in the first funnel put an electric heater with known voltage and current (measured with an ammeter and voltmeter), or known energy loss (Joulemeter). Set the heater going for 5 minutes and turn it off. Record the volume (and therefore mass) of the water melted due to the heater by subtracting the volume of water melted in the control, and use the equation:

    Q = ml, or VIt = ml (where t in this case is 300 seconds):

    to find l, the latent heat of fusion of the water.

    That's all the thermal ones I can think of... there is a tricky electricity one that always gets me to do with measuring the internal resistance, could anyone help me with that?

    Internal Resistance:

    Emf = V + Ir (r is internal resistance, v is voltage in the circuit)

    so, to find r, u connect a voltmeter across a cell in an open circuit. That gives you the emf. Then, connect the cell to a circuit with an ammeter and a variable resistor (with a voltmeter across it).

    Basically, you can find the various values of the resistor and the voltage and current readings you get. You can sub in these readings for emf = V + Ir.

    also, u could be asked to solve it graphically. Plot V on y axis, I on x axis.

    emf = V + Ir

    V = -rI + emf (y = mx + c)

    -r is the gradient, emf is y intercept...
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    So when you set up a voltmeter across the terminals of a battery, the voltmeter has such a high resistance that there is almost no current, and therefore no lost volts to the internal resistor?

    Thanks for that bit, I only knew how to do it graphically but the other way seems easier!

    (Original post by mik1a)
    Boyle's Law:

    Have an upside down round flask containing air with measurements so the volume of the air can be recorded. Underneath this air have some oil and a pume linked to a pressure guage on the oil (If I remember right, you cannot have the pump going to the air, because the mass must be constant.

    Pump different quantities of air into the container, leave to settle for 30 seonds and record the pressure and corresponding volume of the air. By plotting 1/volume against the pressure, you should get a straight line throught the origin, indicating p = k/V, or pV = k, which is Boyle's law.
    In the one I described, the mass isn't a problem because there are 2 separate "bits" of air, separated by the oil.

    So you pump in more air ==> pressure transmitted through oil ==> higher pressure on the trapped air, without the mass of the trapped air being changed. a bit hard to describe without a picture!
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    does anyone have th past papers for unit 2, 5 and 6 for january 2004. thanx.
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    lo, Anyone know any good links for Physics Revision? Maths had some very good ones and S-Cool is alright, its just im looking for something a bit more
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    like this yeah?
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    does anyone have physics edexcel phy2 markschemes?
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    (Original post by CoolDude13)
    does anyone have physics edexcel phy2 markschemes?

    Sorry guys but i only thought of this a few minutes ago.Hope this helps
    C:\Program Files\Bearwood Physics 2004\asa2revision1.htm
    If not ....then can someone tell me how to transfer the file so everyone can view it.........good luck.Hope u get want u're looking for.

    (Original post by MelisaOctober)
    Sorry guys but i only thought of this a few minutes ago.Hope this helps
    C:\Program Files\Bearwood Physics 2004\asa2revision1.htm
    If not ....then can someone tell me how to transfer the file so everyone can view it.........good luck.Hope u get want u're looking for.
    the C:\Program Files\Bearwood Physics 2004\asa2revision1.htm means the files are stored locally on your computer ie we cant see them , thanks for the suggestions tho.....i think someone has a paper exchange site where you can upload them....lemme see if i cna find it...

    (Original post by mik1a)
    like this yeah?
    yeah, that's it. i think in an exam youwould probably need to include some indication of measuring volume tho.
    #
    It;s probably easier to have, instead of the big bulb of air, something that allows you to measure the volume of the air a bit easier. Although if you knew the capacity of the round bit and had a scale next top the straight bit it'd be fine


    rosie
 
 
 

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