Anyone doing Philosophy and Economics at LSE? Watch

JP0458B
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Hi, Id appreciate if anyone doing said course could tell me what GCSES,A levels etc they had as trying to decide on my chances for this course

Thanks


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AhmedChan
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I'm applying for the same course but I'm not to happy about my chances of getting in
GCSE: 3A*'s 5A's 2B's
AS level: AAABB maths, psychology, economics, physics, general studies respectively
Predicted: AAA
What did you get?
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JP0458B
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(Original post by AhmedChan)
I'm applying for the same course but I'm not to happy about my chances of getting in
GCSE: 3A*'s 5A's 2B's
AS level: AAABB maths, psychology, economics, physics, general studies respectively
Predicted: AAA
What did you get?
10A* GCSE, AAAA in Maths Economics Geography and French, doing AS Further Maths as well


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AhmedChan
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Well... your chances are a lot higher then mine. As long as your personal statement is good you are solid. Good luck Don
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JP0458B
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(Original post by AhmedChan)
Well... your chances are a lot higher then mine. As long as your personal statement is good you are solid. Good luck Don
Thanks Ahmed, you're in a good position too


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l'Autoderision
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Hey, I'm applying for it as well.
IGCSEs: 3A*s and 1A.
predicted IB 44/45. hl maths, econ, english; sl business management, environmental science, chinese.

I only went to some kind of international school in high school so I didn't take GCSE courses earlier. Not so sure if LSE would give me worse chances because of my IGCSE subjects' numbers. Also not sure if they give worse chances to foreigners.
btw, I really want to know if people applying to this course are more inclined to one subject over another. I my self find philosophy a lot more attractive than econ. I'm taking econ just to avoid unemployment .
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Ephemere
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Hello,
I am currently in my third year studying this course and my results were:
A*A*A* in English Literature, Economics and Maths. AA in Further Mathematics and Chinese (Mandarin).
My GCSE's were 10 A* and an A in Additional Maths (does this qualification even exist anymore?!)
Hope that helps. During my time at LSE, I have made friends who entered with lower A level/GCSE grades, who I believe are way more capable than I am.
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Ephemere
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(Original post by l'Autoderision)
Hey, I'm applying for it as well.
IGCSEs: 3A*s and 1A.
predicted IB 44/45. hl maths, econ, english; sl business management, environmental science, chinese.

I only went to some kind of international school in high school so I didn't take GCSE courses earlier. Not so sure if LSE would give me worse chances because of my IGCSE subjects' numbers. Also not sure if they give worse chances to foreigners.
btw, I really want to know if people applying to this course are more inclined to one subject over another. I my self find philosophy a lot more attractive than econ. I'm taking econ just to avoid unemployment .
Hello, if it is any consolation. I am a 'foreigner' as well. I think admissions would take into consideration that IGCSE's are relatively harder. When I applied, I had no initial interest in philosophy but I wasn't as strong quantitatively to apply for BSc Economics. My personal statement was 90% Economics, as I applied for that in all my other UCAS choices.


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AhmedChan
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(Original post by Ephemere)
Hello, if it is any consolation. I am a 'foreigner' as well. I think admissions would take into consideration that IGCSE's are relatively harder. When I applied, I had no initial interest in philosophy but I wasn't as strong quantitatively to apply for BSc Economics. My personal statement was 90% Economics, as I applied for that in all my other UCAS choices.


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Hi,
Thanks for your post on this thread, I have a few questions regarding the course that I hope you can answer!
1.) Is the course enjoyable, you said that the other courses you applied for were pure econ so did you/are you enjoying the philosophy element.
2.) When did you get a response back knowing whether or not you have got an offer
3.) Do you study philosophy and economics separately for the most part because i was looking at the modules studies and the course content and it seems as if you only study the 2 subjects together in the third year.
4.) Do philosophy and economics students get similar jobs the pure economics students get.
Thanks in advance for your response
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Ephemere
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(Original post by AhmedChan)
Hi,
Thanks for your post on this thread, I have a few questions regarding the course that I hope you can answer!
1.) Is the course enjoyable, you said that the other courses you applied for were pure econ so did you/are you enjoying the philosophy element.
2.) When did you get a response back knowing whether or not you have got an offer
3.) Do you study philosophy and economics separately for the most part because i was looking at the modules studies and the course content and it seems as if you only study the 2 subjects together in the third year.
4.) Do philosophy and economics students get similar jobs the pure economics students get.
Thanks in advance for your response
1) I have really enjoyed 'my' course so far due the the modules I have picked, I have rarely met Philosophy and Economics students who have chosen the same modules. I guess one advantage of this course is its flexibility. For example, in my first year I took one Economics course, two Maths courses and one Philosophy course (the content was elementary). In my second year, I took two Economics courses, one Philosophy course (Logic, which is not what I would associate with Philosophy) and one outside option (English Literature). Finally, in my third year I have chosen to do a dissertation on Economics, compulsory Philosophy of Economics course and two other Economics courses. Therefore I don't know if I am qualified to answer your question about the philosophy element, as upon reflection only 1 out of my 12 modules has been Philosophy.
2) I got my offer on March 20-something, they really took their sweet time!!
3) From my experience, Economics and Philosophy is taught separately at the LSE (different departments). The only crossover MAY be the Philosophy of Economics course this year. However, I found that philosophy permeates into your other areas of study. I was always questioning about Bayesian rationality in my economic classes, to everybody's annoyance. I am almost certain that I will approach my Economics dissertation with a philosophical mindset.
4) By similar, do you mean jobs in finance? If so, yes. But that applies to the whole of LSE as I know five graduates from 2015 who are all at Goldman Sachs, but they studied Econometrics with Mathematical Economics/Economics with Philosophy/Geography with Economics/ Management/ Actuarial Science.

I hope that helps
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Ephemere
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One more note: if you are in doubt between Economics or Philosophy and Economics, there is a possibility of transfer in second year. This is because in first year 3/4 modules are the same in both courses and if you achieve a first in economics, maths, statistics then you stand a good chance (and have probably scored higher than most economics students).


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AhmedChan
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Hey Don,
Have you got your reply from lse yet?
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Etmy1998
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How would you go about changing your course to economics? Wouldn't the course already be full?
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Etmy1998
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(Original post by AhmedChan)
Hey Don,
Have you got your reply from lse yet?
I got my offer on 17th December


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JP0458B
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(Original post by Etmy1998)
I got my offer on 17th December


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What A levels are you taking?


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Etmy1998
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(Original post by Don Joiner)
What A levels are you taking?


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Maths, Economics and History
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toniliang
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(Original post by Ephemere)
Hello,
I am currently in my third year studying this course and my results were:
A*A*A* in English Literature, Economics and Maths. AA in Further Mathematics and Chinese (Mandarin).
My GCSE's were 10 A* and an A in Additional Maths (does this qualification even exist anymore?!)
Hope that helps. During my time at LSE, I have made friends who entered with lower A level/GCSE grades, who I believe are way more capable than I am.
Hi! It's great to meet someone studying P&E here! I have some questions about this course and it would be really nice of you if you can give me some advice!

1.I just got an offer for Accounting & Finance days ago, but I've heard that student studying A&F or other commerce subjects are focusing too much on applying for internship and pay little attention on studying😂 I wonder if that's true?

2. If that's true, I do wish to change into some major focusing more on academics(like P&E), as I do like philosophy myself. so is P&E more an academic focus course? and is changing course before the start of the first year possible?

3. Where do student studying P&E usually do when they graduate?

4. You said you are a "foreign student" as well, would you mind telling me where are you from?

Thank you SOOOOOOOOOOOOO much!!!
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jasmine_GCSE
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(Original post by Ephemere)
1) I have really enjoyed 'my' course so far due the the modules I have picked, I have rarely met Philosophy and Economics students who have chosen the same modules. I guess one advantage of this course is its flexibility. For example, in my first year I took one Economics course, two Maths courses and one Philosophy course (the content was elementary). In my second year, I took two Economics courses, one Philosophy course (Logic, which is not what I would associate with Philosophy) and one outside option (English Literature). Finally, in my third year I have chosen to do a dissertation on Economics, compulsory Philosophy of Economics course and two other Economics courses. Therefore I don't know if I am qualified to answer your question about the philosophy element, as upon reflection only 1 out of my 12 modules has been Philosophy.
2) I got my offer on March 20-something, they really took their sweet time!!
3) From my experience, Economics and Philosophy is taught separately at the LSE (different departments). The only crossover MAY be the Philosophy of Economics course this year. However, I found that philosophy permeates into your other areas of study. I was always questioning about Bayesian rationality in my economic classes, to everybody's annoyance. I am almost certain that I will approach my Economics dissertation with a philosophical mindset.
4) By similar, do you mean jobs in finance? If so, yes. But that applies to the whole of LSE as I know five graduates from 2015 who are all at Goldman Sachs, but they studied Econometrics with Mathematical Economics/Economics with Philosophy/Geography with Economics/ Management/ Actuarial Science.

I hope that helps
Hey, I know you posted a long time ago and I'm sure the composition of the course may have changed now, but, would you be able to tell me how maths heavy the economics part of the 'philosophy and economics' degree was? Is it a lot more complex than a level maths?
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ChangeOurWorld
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(Original post by l'Autoderision)
Hey, I'm applying for it as well.
IGCSEs: 3A*s and 1A.
predicted IB 44/45. hl maths, econ, english; sl business management, environmental science, chinese.

I only went to some kind of international school in high school so I didn't take GCSE courses earlier. Not so sure if LSE would give me worse chances because of my IGCSE subjects' numbers. Also not sure if they give worse chances to foreigners.
btw, I really want to know if people applying to this course are more inclined to one subject over another. I my self find philosophy a lot more attractive than econ. I'm taking econ just to avoid unemployment .
You'll be fine. LSE is one of the most internationally diverse university's in the world. You will 100% not be given a 'worse change' because you're not British. People come here from all over the world with different and often a mish-mash of different qualifications. You're IB score is impressive and that's definitly a major draw for them.
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Connor27
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(Original post by jasmine_GCSE)
Hey, I know you posted a long time ago and I'm sure the composition of the course may have changed now, but, would you be able to tell me how maths heavy the economics part of the 'philosophy and economics' degree was? Is it a lot more complex than a level maths?
In first year you’ll study EC100 or EC102 (depending on whether or not you did A Level Economics); both of these modules are very basic level economics and do not require much mathematical aptitude at all. This module is basically an A Level refresher in economics for those who have no formal grounding in the subject.

You’ll also do PH103 which covers “the big questions” in philosophy, this requires no maths whatsoever and is entirely essay based.

Then you’ll do two half modules MA107 and ST107, both of these cover stats and quantitative methods in social sciences; again not TOO challenging, but probably a step further than A Level maths i’d say. Things like linear algebra, set theory and calculus are covered here.

Interestingly, your final module PH101 or PH104 (you choose which one to do at the start of the year; PH104 is considered more rigorous though) requires maths; both of these cover you with an introduction to logic, while PH104 delves deeper into things like modal logic, counterfactuals, paradoxes and accounts of causation. However, even if you choose PH104, the maths requirement you should find simple compared to your work at A Level and in ST107/MA107.

Source: I’ve just finished most of these modules myself as a first year lmao

Hope that was helpful.
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