eleanorbartram
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#1
Currently touching up my personal statement and just needed to know if anyone knew anything about Tort Law, since I have no one to check it with. Wanted to add some technical knowledge into it and just wondered if someone can judge if it makes sense or not! Thank you in advance
0
reply
Nolofinwë
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#2
Report 5 years ago
#2
Hi OP,

I’m sure someone will give a fuller opinion, but I’ve just got a couple of initial notes assuming only minor changes are needed. (1) In private law, one would say ‘sue’ (or, more properly still, ‘bring an action against’), not ‘prosecute’. (2) If this is for England/Wales, we no longer use ‘plaintiff’ and ‘tortfeasor’, having modernised them to ‘claimant’ and ‘defendant’. (3) Most tort courses that I know of do not place any (major) focus on torts like assault and battery, because they tend to be too close to the criminal law syllabus. Consider adding something about other major torts, especially negligence (also nuisance, economic torts, conversion, trespass, defamation, depending on what each uni teaches), instead/as well.
0
reply
eleanorbartram
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#3
(Original post by Nolofinwë)
Hi OP,

I’m sure someone will give a fuller opinion, but I’ve just got a couple of initial notes assuming only minor changes are needed. (1) In private law, one would say ‘sue’ (or, more properly still, ‘bring an action against’), not ‘prosecute’. (2) If this is for England/Wales, we no longer use ‘plaintiff’ and ‘tortfeasor’, having modernised them to ‘claimant’ and ‘defendant’. (3) Most tort courses that I know of do not place any (major) focus on torts like assault and battery, because they tend to be too close to the criminal law syllabus. Consider adding something about other major torts, especially negligence (also nuisance, economic torts, conversion, trespass, defamation, depending on what each uni teaches), instead/as well.
Thank you, this is really helpful! Yes it's England that I'm going to be studying it in. I will make those alterations now, thanks again
0
reply
Nolofinwë
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#4
Report 5 years ago
#4
(Original post by eleanorbartram)
Thank you, this is really helpful! Yes it's England that I'm going to be studying it in. I will make those alterations now, thanks again
No problem at all. Seeing as no-one else has committed, I thought I would lend a further thought. Since you are citing Locke on a point about freedom, I thought you might like to link this in to some specific area of jurisprudence. While I don't doubt that a freedom argument can be applied to tort (it could be applied anywhere), a personal interest of mine is the way in which the law of contract is a very central facility by which the law confers freedom on its citizens. If you are interested, 'The Concept of Law' by HLA Hart (who is probably the significant legal philosopher in a modern context) has some concise and interesting ideas on this: see in particular Chapter 3, sub-section 1, especially the start of that sub-section. It's a very accessible read, so I would recommend having a look at it if you are interested.
0
reply
eleanorbartram
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#5
(Original post by Nolofinwë)
No problem at all. Seeing as no-one else has committed, I thought I would lend a further thought. Since you are citing Locke on a point about freedom, I thought you might like to link this in to some specific area of jurisprudence. While I don't doubt that a freedom argument can be applied to tort (it could be applied anywhere), a personal interest of mine is the way in which the law of contract is a very central facility by which the law confers freedom on its citizens. If you are interested, 'The Concept of Law' by HLA Hart (who is probably the significant legal philosopher in a modern context) has some concise and interesting ideas on this: see in particular Chapter 3, sub-section 1, especially the start of that sub-section. It's a very accessible read, so I would recommend having a look at it if you are interested.

Oh thank you for the information, I shall add that in instead, it seems a lot more relevant to my quote. Thanks so much, will have a read!!
0
reply
Carnationlilyrose
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#6
Report 5 years ago
#6
(Original post by eleanorbartram)
Oh thank you for the information, I shall add that in instead, it seems a lot more relevant to my quote. Thanks so much, will have a read!!
I have edited out your PS from this post, but as it went undetected for over a day, I'm afraid it is far too late. Your PS will have been cached by Google and will now flag up on UCAS's plagiarism software. You will have to start again, I'm afraid.
0
reply
eleanorbartram
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#7
(Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
I have edited out your PS from this post, but as it went undetected for over a day, I'm afraid it is far too late. Your PS will have been cached by Google and will now flag up on UCAS's plagiarism software. You will have to start again, I'm afraid.
Is this a joke? What.
0
reply
Oli T-H
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#8
Report 5 years ago
#8
(Original post by eleanorbartram)
Is this a joke? What.
Nope, it's not. Welcome to the harsh world of Higher Education.
1
reply
eleanorbartram
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#9
(Original post by Oli T-H)
Nope, it's not. Welcome to the harsh world of Higher Education.


The internet ruins lives. Lol, guess i'll start again.
0
reply
Carnationlilyrose
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#10
Report 5 years ago
#10
(Original post by eleanorbartram)
Is this a joke? What.
It most definitely is not a joke, as you will see from many threads in this forum. When you submit your Ucas application, your PS is run through anti-plagiarism software which will produce a report with a percentage similarity to others it has found, both in its own archive and from anything Google turns up. Anyone could have copied and used what you wrote. Your PS will be found on Google by now, and will trigger a percentage. Ucas submits this percentage to the universities you have applied for and it is up to them what they do with the information.

When I make jokes, they are funny.
1
reply
callum_law
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#11
Report 5 years ago
#11
(Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
It most definitely is not a joke, as you will see from many threads in this forum. When you submit your Ucas application, your PS is run through anti-plagiarism software which will produce a report with a percentage similarity to others it has found, both in its own archive and from anything Google turns up. Anyone could have copied and used what you wrote. Your PS will be found on Google by now, and will trigger a percentage. Ucas submits this percentage to the universities you have applied for and it is up to them what they do with the information.

When I make jokes, they are funny.
That's up for debate.
0
reply
eleanorbartram
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#12
(Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
It most definitely is not a joke, as you will see from many threads in this forum. When you submit your Ucas application, your PS is run through anti-plagiarism software which will produce a report with a percentage similarity to others it has found, both in its own archive and from anything Google turns up. Anyone could have copied and used what you wrote. Your PS will be found on Google by now, and will trigger a percentage. Ucas submits this percentage to the universities you have applied for and it is up to them what they do with the information.

When I make jokes, they are funny.
Yeah, I understand. Thanks for the info, I will change it now. Was thoughtless to post it, just struggled for advice on technicalities of law and did not consider people copying it but the truth is now very blatant. Ah, how naive.
0
reply
Carnationlilyrose
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#13
Report 5 years ago
#13
(Original post by eleanorbartram)
Yeah, I understand. Thanks for the info, I will change it now. Was thoughtless to post it, just struggled for advice on technicalities of law and did not consider people copying it but the truth is now very blatant. Ah, how naive.
Everyone makes mistakes. You are lucky in that it was only a paragraph.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Current uni students - are you thinking of dropping out of university?

Yes, I'm seriously considering dropping out (147)
14.54%
I'm not sure (43)
4.25%
No, I'm going to stick it out for now (303)
29.97%
I have already dropped out (26)
2.57%
I'm not a current university student (492)
48.66%

Watched Threads

View All